Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Many have asked me what's the best way to break in a new VW TDI and the Cruze TDI . Well here you go and this sums it up in a nut shell .

Rules that apply for the life of the car
-When the engine is cold (below the first 3 white marks at the base of the temp gage) rev the engine to at least 2,500 rpms.
-When the engine is warmed up (above the first three white marks) Rev the engine to no less than 3,000 rpms.
The reason for this is to keep the turbo on boost, clear the VNT guide vanes and apply firm pressure to the rings for optimal sealing against blow-by gases. The rings need the boost to seal since its a turbo charged engine, babying the engine is detrimental and will lead to issues with compression if done so for very long.
-Keep rpms as close to 2000 rpm as possible when driving at a steady speed. This promotes optimum temperatures for the DPF and keeps the engine in the middle of its most efficient rpm range (1800-2200 rpm).
-Allow the DSG or automatic transmission to determine the optimal gear and engine rpm. It knows better than you... Provided you have it trained to be biased to the sport mode the engines shift points will occur at the ideal ranges.


Redline defined as the maximum rpm allowed by the engine, in the case of all TDI's it is 5,100 rpm. The maximum physical limit of a TDI engine due in part to it's short stroke is approximately 8,800 rpm (this is when you will throw a rod or damage a piston, this rpm is not possible unless you force a down shift into 1st gear while driving 80mph)

The instrument cluster shows a red BAND starting at or around 4600 rpm, most owners will find that very little power resides beyond this point due mostly to the ECU reducing fueling to respect the smoke map.

Adaptive Transmissions, these transmissions learn based on how you apply the power with your foot. Over time they will modify shift patterns with a bias to a "Sport" mode. Train the transmission to shift as close to the recommended rpm ranges below.

When your engine was first produced the motor was placed in a test cell and "Run-in" by a computer run dyno. The motor after the run-in was DRAINED OF ALL ITS FLUIDS (Oil, Coolant etc), the filters were replaced and a unique break-in oil was installed to promote a proper break-in once installed in the car as well as to protect the engine from corrosion during shipping to final assembly.

The "Break-in oil", YES VW does use a specially formulated "Break-In" oil formulated under an internal "TL" specification and produced by Fuchs. The oil is a group IV synthetic 5w30 formulated to comply with the LowSAPS VW507.00 requirements as well as the TL specifications for break-in. The oil is intended to allow a controlled rate of wear while protecting the engine and allowing the internal parts to seat properly during the engines first 10,000 road miles.

First 1,000 miles
Keep rpms below 3,800. Avoid steady rpms. Frequent firm (75%) application of power is strongly recommended up to a maximum engine rpm of 3,800. Avoid the use of cruise control so that you naturally fluctuate the power with your foot.
DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

1,000-5,000 miles
Use the full 5,100 rpm power range. THIS DOES NOT MEAN DRIVE AROUND AT 5100 RPM! This DOES mean to find the rpm range where your cars best power resides. Most owners will find that the best engine operating range to be between 2000rpm and 4200 rpm for the purpose of acceleration. At all costs avoid using full throttle below 2000 rpm the ECU will attempt to prevent you from applying full power in this range, work with it and don't request it with your foot.
Continue to avoid steady rpms and avoid the use of cruise control. occasional application of full throttle (100%) is recommended to help seat the rings. City driving is ideal for breaking in a TDI due to frequent stops and acceleration. DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

5,000-10,000 miles
Use of the cruise control is ok at this point since most of the initial break in has occurred. Continue to use occasional full throttle accelerations to continue to seat the rings. You will notice the engine become slightly louder during this phase due to less friction from the engine breaking in (normal for a diesel to become louder under lighter loads). If your going on a long drive and you are using the cruise, every so often step on the peddle to accelerate up about 20 mph then coast back down to your preset speed.

Your first oil change is due at 10,000 miles DO NOT change it early! Oil analysis supports 10,000 miles as being realistic for a first change interval. Wear metals will remain at safe levels during this entire first interval thanks to the initial run-in and flush at the factory before the engine was installed in your car.

10,000-60,000
This is when the rest of the break in occurs. The engine from the factory will check out with about 475psi of compression pressure out of the crate. It will take at least 60,000 miles to reach the peak pressure of 510 psi. For the most part once you get to 10,000 miles your compression will be around 490 psi meaning that most of the break in has occurred.

60,000-the life of the motor
The owners have followed the advice above and do not have any oil consumption issues. This also means that with the higher pressure the engine is more efficient returning optimal fuel economy and reduced smoke output. I am still of the opinion that if possible use a LowSAPS 5w40 instead of the 5w30 oils ie Mobil 1 ESP 5w40 formula M (MB229.51, .6 Sulfated Ash) ...:eusa_clap: Also defiantly use a LowSAPS oil in 5w30 or 5w40 range.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,080 Posts
Thank you for the write up it should help a lot of people with what to them is a new experience in motoring. My diesel has never used any oil so I guess I lucked out in my running in so far. I am at 35,000km to date in nearly 3 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
It's all good other then the part about going 10K on the factory fill. Great idea in a VW TDI, bad idea in the Cruze diesel.

Most of this info is only useful to someone who plans to try and run one of these motors past 300k....If driven just normally and not babied there is really no need to worry about anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Boraz,
The main reason I haven't said or shown any one how to do this as I already had 2 dealers give me flack and tried and yes did try to void my warranty over this mod so I made a decision not to do a how to on this as I fear other would have the same issues with ahem "Sir you have tampered with your fuel system and if your pump goes out it's your fault". I don't want to have some one on here come back and say well I tried this guy instructions now I will blame you for my action... sorry I pass on that per my lawyer/diesel owner friendly advise .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
I didn't follow any of those break-in procedures for my CTD except varied and moderate speeds and throttle. The oil was changed at 5,500 miles per dealer instructions. I used a similar technique with my new 1985 Mercedes 300DT. When I sold it at 250,000 miles in 2008 it had many problems but burned no oil and had never had an engine or transmission repair.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,080 Posts
The one thing I do with every vehicle I have owned is drive gently until the engine reaches normal operating temperature. Have not had any engine problems doing this. I also avoid idling the engine to warm it up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,652 Posts
I drove mine like I stole it from day 1. I have 113K miles now and still runs like new with great power and zero oil consumption in between my 15K oil change intervals.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top