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The kit creates a new path for the PCV valve and closes off the factory one as it is not repairable.
Yes it opens and is a little over engineered for the job, but it is seemingly the best candidate for the price.
I would hate to have to hunt for a check valve that actuates at 0.5psi so I see value in the kit, was just curious thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #102
So from looking at this kit, basically using some NPT adapters to mount a brass check valve onto the plastic manifold, and epoxying the OEM mount location? I am just curious if the check valve is ever opened it seems like a large one.
It's a bit more complicated but yes. The adapter is a very specific NPT adapter from Mid-America Fittings as that's a thicker SAE spec that has a flat thread flange that seats well to a mil-spec stainless washer (also specific washers to prevent corrosion). The NPT lockout can't rotate inside the port making it a permanent solution. The check valve has a 1/2PSI crack pressure and the one on the v3 kit is even lower at 1/4 PSI. While the check valve is insanely overbuilt for the application, it will probably not leak or clog for the life of the vehicle. Obviously I can't state it as a guarantee but the design is orders of magnitude better from a flow and sealing pressure perspective. The return/vacuum path uses a special brake booster stacked tee connection which allows for an easy snap-in install without interfering with the brake booster's function. The clamps are OEM-style constant tension spring clamps, Dacromet coated for corrosion resistance.

It's pretty simple on first glance but there are some specific design decisions that make it work as well as it has been. About half the price of a new manifold and will last far longer.

The epoxy is used to seal the nylon washer to the old PCV port as well as a thread locker for the stainless screw holding it in place. The v3 kit uses a quick plug that can be inserted through the PCV port so manifold removal isn't required.

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So is the valve in the v3 kit considered “better”? If so may need to upgrade the v2 setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #104
So is the valve in the v3 kit considered “better”? If so may need to upgrade the v2 setup.
No. The check valve on the v2 kit is technically better. I created the v3 kit to have a cheaper option (it's only $75 shipped) with a more easily serviceable check valve and a "pcv pipe" replacement in one (a $45 value in itself), and along the way figured out how to install it without even removing the intake manifold which is probably the biggest benefit to the kit.

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Discussion Starter #106
Any news on when the V3 will be available? It doesn’t appear to be on cruzekits.com
I'm almost out of stock on clamps and waiting for my restocking order to arrive. I have 5000 clamps on their way here. Hopefully I'll have the v3 kit posted by the end of the week.

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I just finished installing my v2 kit, all seemed to go well. I haven't driven it much however when coming to operating temperature, I can still hear a slight whistling sound that sounds like a vacuum leak. I installed a new Dorman valve cover about 2 months ago before doing this fix kit. Might the diaphragm already have gone bad in that cover which might be where I'm hearing a leak?
 

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I just finished installing my v2 kit, all seemed to go well. I haven't driven it much however when coming to operating temperature, I can still hear a slight whistling sound that sounds like a vacuum leak. I installed a new Dorman valve cover about 2 months ago before doing this fix kit. Might the diaphragm already have gone bad in that cover which might be where I'm hearing a leak?
It is possible. Put your finger over the vacuum regulator on the valve cover and see what happens.
 

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@Blasirl no change in the whistling. I’m going to scope around the back of the bay where I believe the whistle is coming from. I wonder if my manifold itself went bad, which would mean....ugh


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The hole that the orange check valve used to occupy.
That's what you're supposed to do
Closest thing I could find was a complete head gasket set at $229. I'm tempted just to slap a little bead of RTV around the bolts. The o rings that are on them are dry, brittle and one completely disintegrated.
Does this bypass the car's Ability to throw the proper codes and/or protect itself Does your check valve the even in the same way the factory one would
 

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Discussion Starter #112
That's what you're supposed to do

Does this bypass the car's Ability to throw the proper codes and/or protect itself Does your check valve the even in the same way the factory one would
It's not a bypass. It's a re-route. It retains all factory PCV functions. It does not remove any failsafes.

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Discussion Starter #113 (Edited)
Hey guys, I'll be sending out this as an e-mail to everyone that ordered the kit, but figured I'd share this here as well.

I wanted to take a brief moment to share some tips on maintaining the PCV system with my PCV fix kit installed. The initial goal behind designing this DIY fix kit for the 1.4L Turbo PCV system was to create a more affordable, more durable alternative to repeatedly replacing the intake manifold. Through prolonged use, testing, and feedback from the community, I'd like to share some simple steps that can be taken to ensure that the PCV system and the fix kit continue to operate reliably for years to come.
  • For the V1/V2 kits, the check valve in the kit is very durable and should function reliably with no maintenance required for at least 100,000 miles, after which I do reccomend inspection. There have been no reports of failures.
  • Some community members have noticed the PCV system tends to get a little dirty around the cylinder head. To check for this, remove the corrugated/accordion hose connector from on top of the intake manifold and have a look inside to make sure the area looks generally clean. A bit of orange residue is OK, especially during winter driving. This is just condensation mixed with oil.
  • Specific to the V2 kit: the brake booster tee fitting should be periodically checked and cleaned (if necessary) to ensure it flows freely and that the PCV system and brake booster continue to function properly. So far, reports have shown it to be clean and clear at 100,000 miles. A good start would be checking it at every oil change, then adjusting thereafter. A bit of condensation is normal, but if you find those parts do need cleaning, you can use a small pipe brush/straw cleaner or a pipe cleaner (the kind kids use for arts and crafts).
  • To ensure the valve cover is working correctly (aside from the potential for an occasional vacuum regulator failure), check for excessive vacuum by pulling the dipstick while the engine is idling. The engine should be sucking air in through the dipstick, but it shouldn't be difficult to pull the dipstick out.
 
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