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Sounds like a lot of work. I'd still need half the parts necessary for the donut so I'll pass. I did this in my civic when I converted to 5 lug. I installed a winter tire where the spare sits. It fit nicely once the floor was raised around it.
 

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After all this time, i have been thinking about it also and I was able to locate the entire assembly tire jack, cover and mounting bolt for @$300 shipped. FWIW, I found mine on Ebay in a Junk Yard.
 

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Part Number 95271368 is a spare tire kit that will be available in the future. I don't know what else it comes with other than the tire, wheel, and jack. That is all the parts catalog is telling me. Retail price is going to be $500.00.
 

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Interesting thread. I have not checked under my trunk mat to see if I have a donut spare or an inflator kit. 2013 Cruze LS, took custody (leased) in January.

All readers be aware: Be sure to check or have checked the pressure in the spare at least twice per year. Dealers claim to do it with an oil change as part of their free 26 or 29 point inspection ("Pressure checked in all tires" But the results shown on the form are only for the four mounted tires). They don't even check the donut spare pressure as part of a Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) inspection and prep. My daughter bought a CPO 2008 VW Eos in 2011 and when she got it home, I did my once over, as I have been doing for 50 years when a new or different car enters my life. Donut spare pressure was 22 psig. I pumped it up to 60 and then fired off a nasty email to the dealership (he owns 5 locations/brands) owner and never heard a word back. Just took my 2013 Taurus in for an oil change at a Ford Dealer Quick Lane and when the guy went over the "findings" of the 26 point inspection, I forgot to ask if they checked the pressure in the donut spare tire. My estimate of when the car was built would indicate that the donut spare in the Taurus was initially inflated to 60 psig just about a year ago. I checked it a day or so after the oil change and it was at 44 psig. These things slowly leak down. They are dangerous to use with low pressure.

P.S.: The Taurus is my wife's car and she has about half of her belongings in the trunk. So for me, the easy way to tell if the spare is being checked at the dealership is to look out thru the window from the waiting area to see if there is a pile of stuff on the floor of the service area during the 26 point inspection. Ain't gonna happen. The 10 minute oil change places (Jiffy Lube etc) don't check the spare tire pressure either.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Interesting thread. I have not checked under my trunk mat to see if I have a donut spare or an inflator kit. 2013 Cruze LS, took custody (leased) in January.

All readers be aware: Be sure to check or have checked the pressure in the spare at least twice per year. Dealers claim to do it with an oil change as part of their free 26 or 29 point inspection ("Pressure checked in all tires" But the results shown on the form are only for the four mounted tires). They don't even check the donut spare pressure as part of a Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) inspection and prep. My daughter bought a CPO 2008 VW Eos in 2011 and when she got it home, I did my once over, as I have been doing for 50 years when a new or different car enters my life. Donut spare pressure was 22 psig. I pumped it up to 60 and then fired off a nasty email to the dealership (he owns 5 locations/brands) owner and never heard a word back. Just took my 2013 Taurus in for an oil change at a Ford Dealer Quick Lane and when the guy went over the "findings" of the 26 point inspection, I forgot to ask if they checked the pressure in the donut spare tire. My estimate of when the car was built would indicate that the donut spare in the Taurus was initially inflated to 60 psig just about a year ago. I checked it a day or so after the oil change and it was at 44 psig. These things slowly leak down. They are dangerous to use with low pressure.

P.S.: The Taurus is my wife's car and she has about half of her belongings in the trunk. So for me, the easy way to tell if the spare is being checked at the dealership is to look out thru the window from the waiting area to see if there is a pile of stuff on the floor of the service area during the 26 point inspection. Ain't gonna happen. The 10 minute oil change places (Jiffy Lube etc) don't check the spare tire pressure either.
You did notice my instructions to put the air pump back into the trunk just for this very reason - no one remembers to check the spare for pressure. With the pump you don't have to. You inflate the spare when you need it.
 

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My car has a spare. So we are all supposed to go out and buy a $50 air compressor to take up space in our trunk instead of occasionally checking the pressure in the spare, like when we check the oil. Well, at least that is only 10% as much as spending $500 on a spare tire and kit. I think I could buy 8 years worth of AAA Gold with 99 miles of free towing for $500. Pay me now or pay me later............
 

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My car has a spare. So we are all supposed to go out and buy a $50 air compressor to take up space in our trunk instead of occasionally checking the pressure in the spare, like when we check the oil. Well, at least that is only 10% as much as spending $500 on a spare tire and kit. I think I could buy 8 years worth of AAA Gold with 99 miles of free towing for $500. Pay me now or pay me later............
Whether you are aware of it or not: You(or someone) spent @ 100 for that spare. They are not free even with the LS. All Obermd was getting at: If you have an Eco with no spare, you get an inflator kit. Inflate the spare then the inflator kit is no longer needed in the car He is not suggesting to go out and buy a $50 air compressor. Just go to a local gas station and spend a buck and fill the spare up and the air compressor is not needed any more. I have AAA also, pay $55 a year and typically use it only for Hotel discounts on vacation and could probably get rid of AAA since I spent @300 on the spare tire and set up(including the trunk floor) I have a 12 gallon air compressor in garage that I typically do not use but it saves the hassle of using the one at the gas station for bicycles and my wife and my cars and I fill up balls with it also.
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)
My car has a spare. So we are all supposed to go out and buy a $50 air compressor to take up space in our trunk instead of occasionally checking the pressure in the spare, like when we check the oil. Well, at least that is only 10% as much as spending $500 on a spare tire and kit. I think I could buy 8 years worth of AAA Gold with 99 miles of free towing for $500. Pay me now or pay me later............
Actually I bought my first 12v air pump in 1985 and put it in the tiny trunk of my Fiero 2M4. It still works and I have been moving this pump from one car to the next as I replace cars and it is currently in my wife's car. So far in my life I have never needed the spare tire but I have used my 12v air pumps many times over the years, and not just for my cars. Most of these pumps come with attachments to inflate beach toys, bicycle tires, air mattresses, etc. I also put one in my son's car as well. All three cars also have jumper cables. My pump is in a jumper cable bag that hangs from the grocery hook on the left side of the trunk so it takes almost no space in my trunk. This location is that odd shaped area behind the driver's side rear wheel that is almost never used. My jumper cables are wrapped around the top of my spare tire under the floor - again not taking space in the trunk.

Even if you have a spare tire I strongly recommend you do this. It's cheap insurance from a slow leak and can be moved from car to car so it really is a one time purchase. You don't need the overly expensive GM air pump - any 12v air pump with a pressure gauge will do (or you can use the TPMS to watch the pressure). A decent one and bag to store it in will run around $50.

I know someone will say "but you roadside assistance." Yes I know this and I have used roadside assistance. The last time I needed roadside assistance it took over an hour to arrive and that was in a city. I can reinflate my tire/change my flat and be back on the road in a few minutes. Much better than waiting. I know of people who have had to wait overnight for roadside assistance to arrive - I won't be one of them.
 

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I have a 500 amp portable jump start box with a built-in air compressor that I carry at all times. I've used it several times around the garage and even for random strangers needing assistance, but (knock on wood) never for myself.

I bought it over 5 years ago, and this is the third car it's called home. I check to make sure it's charged every time I get an oil change when I also check the pressure in my spare tire.
 

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I have a 1LT with the compact spare and all the parts mentioned above. I wanted to post anyone local(with 150miles of Madison, WI) I would be willing to sell/trade their eco trunk floor and inflation kit for my compact spare, kit and trunk floor. The 150mile range is about the limit of how far I am willing to drive.
Today I met up with a fellow cruzetalk member and sold them my spare tire and all related items mentioned in this thread for $100. I also traded for their ECO trunk and inflation kit. . I will eventually get another spare, but it will be full size & only carry it with me on long trips. .
 

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If you have a 17" rim do not buy a 16" spare! You guys have to be careful using a 16" spare tire with 17" wheels. If you mount the spare tire in the front and drive with that 16" wheel on one side and the 17" rim on the other side you will blow your transmission because of the different rim sizes. The speed sensor in the transmission will try to read the speed or "revolutions" for a 16" and 17" wheel and try to compensate for the amount of revolutions the 16" wheel will lack compared to the 17" and cause catastrophic failure. Even if you mount the 16" spare on the back of the car and drive, the ABS light will turn on because the speed sensor will be reading two different sizes which could also cause a problem with the ABS system. A 16" rim will spin faster than a 17" rim! If you buy a spare, it has to be 17". Lots of proof this is true on google. I've been a Tech for 5+ years and I've seen this happen before.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
If you have a 17" rim do not buy a 16" spare! You guys have to be careful using a 16" spare tire with 17" wheels. If you mount the spare tire in the front and drive with that 16" wheel on one side and the 17" rim on the other side you will blow your transmission because of the different rim sizes. The speed sensor in the transmission will try to read the speed or "revolutions" for a 16" and 17" wheel and try to compensate for the amount of revolutions the 16" wheel will lack compared to the 17" and cause catastrophic failure. Even if you mount the 16" spare on the back of the car and drive, the ABS light will turn on because the speed sensor will be reading two different sizes which could also cause a problem with the ABS system. A 16" rim will spin faster than a 17" rim! If you buy a spare, it has to be 17". Lots of proof this is true on google. I've been a Tech for 5+ years and I've seen this happen before.
General rule of thumb is to always put the spare on the back. Your ABS, Traction Control, and Stabilitrac systems will disengage because of wheel spin differences but you'll protect the transmission and handling won't be completely destroyed.

Thank you for the reminder.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
If you have a 17" rim do not buy a 16" spare! You guys have to be careful using a 16" spare tire with 17" wheels. If you mount the spare tire in the front and drive with that 16" wheel on one side and the 17" rim on the other side you will blow your transmission because of the different rim sizes. The speed sensor in the transmission will try to read the speed or "revolutions" for a 16" and 17" wheel and try to compensate for the amount of revolutions the 16" wheel will lack compared to the 17" and cause catastrophic failure. Even if you mount the 16" spare on the back of the car and drive, the ABS light will turn on because the speed sensor will be reading two different sizes which could also cause a problem with the ABS system. A 16" rim will spin faster than a 17" rim! If you buy a spare, it has to be 17". Lots of proof this is true on google. I've been a Tech for 5+ years and I've seen this happen before.
As a general rule you are correct about purchasing a spare to match the rim size. However, with the donut spares you don't have this option - thus the rule of thumb to put them on the back. Subaru even has some cars that putting the donut spare on the front will void the transmission warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Just for clarification, the spare tire for the North American Cruze LS, LT, ECO, and LTZ is a 16 inch donut spare. This is what I put in my ECO MT as well - part number came from GM. If you need to use this spare here are my recommendations for your safety and to protect the transmission. All of these assume you're sitting on the right shoulder of the road. When sitting on the left side of the road reverse left and right below.

Flat on Left Front: If possible, stop the car with the front end a couple of feet further away from the driving lanes than the back end - this gives you some room to work. Put the spare on the right rear and then move the right rear tire to the front left.

Flat on Right Front: Stop the car parallel to the travel lanes. Put the spare tire on the right rear and then move the right rear to the right front.

Flat on Left Rear: Stop the car with the back end as far from the travel lanes as possible. Put the spare on the left rear tire.

Flat on Right Rear: Stop the car parallel to the travel lanes. Put the spare on the right rear tire.

After putting the spare on, reduce your remaining three tires to door placard pressure and inflate the spare to the sidewall 60 PSI. You should always have an 12v air pump in your car, whether it is the one that came with your ECO MT or one you picked up elsewhere.

For the left tires don't be afraid to put the right side of the car off the pavement as long as there isn't more than a two or three inch drop from the pavement. Also, parking at an angle is perfectly acceptable to keep the jack on the pavement. You want the car reasonably level front to rear but it doesn't have to be perfectly flat.

Before jacking the car, straighten the front wheels, then put the car into 1st gear (MT) or P (AT) and turn the engine off. Pull the handbrake all the way up and turn on your emergency flashers. The Cruze comes with two "wheel chalks". Push these in on the front and back sides of the tire that is on the opposite corner of the tire being replaced before jacking the car.

If you have never replaced a tire on a car I urge you to practice before you get on the road and have a flat. I have had occasion to stop and assist drivers who had never changed a tire and it was obvious on approach that they had no idea what they were doing.

Finally, if for any reason you don't feel safe changing the tire and you have a road side assistance contract call for it. GM provides this as part of all new car purchases, but I don't remember how long it's good for.
 

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Okay, just wanted to make sure everyone was clear on that. Didn't want anyone ruining their transmissions over a small mistake like this. That's a good idea to have a compressor in the trunk as well. End up getting a mini compressor for my cruze too cause it didn't come with it from factory. I use it all the time to keep my tires up to pressure. It's better than paying a gas station 75 cents everytime I need some air :xxrotflmao:
 

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If you have a 17" rim do not buy a 16" spare! You guys have to be careful using a 16" spare tire with 17" wheels. If you mount the spare tire in the front and drive with that 16" wheel on one side and the 17" rim on the other side you will blow your transmission because of the different rim sizes.
This is false. What you need to be concerned with is the Outside Diameter of the tire, the wheel has nothing to do with it. As long as the OD of the tires is the same side to side the transmission won't know the difference.

The speed sensor in the transmission will try to read the speed or "revolutions" for a 16" and 17" wheel and try to compensate for the amount of revolutions the 16" wheel will lack compared to the 17" and cause catastrophic failure
Also false. The transmission only has one speed sensor, a magnetic pickup on the final drive. If tires of different sizes are mounted the differential spins exactly half way between the speed of the two tires:

Differential (mechanical device) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What does happen is the planet gears in the differential rotate on the carrier shaft, and this can generate significant heat and eventually lead to failure since the gears do not ride on bearings. This is not a concern in low speed driving or short trips, but at high speeds or longer trips it is a concern.

In a car with a Limited Slip Differential, there are friction discs that resist the speed differential between the tires. Driving any significant distance with mis-matched tires or an undersize spare on a LSD can quickly cause the friction discs to wear out.

Even if you mount the 16" spare on the back of the car and drive, the ABS light will turn on because the speed sensor will be reading two different sizes which could also cause a problem with the ABS system.
This will cause a malfunction indicator light to illuminate letting you know that something isn't right, and will usually disable the ABS and stability/traction control systems. It will not cause permanent problems with the ABS system.

A 16" rim will spin faster than a 17" rim! If you buy a spare, it has to be 17". Lots of proof this is true on google. I've been a Tech for 5+ years and I've seen this happen before.
Google is only as accurate as the people posting the information.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
This is false. What you need to be concerned with is the Outside Diameter of the tire, the wheel has nothing to do with it. As long as the OD of the tires is the same side to side the transmission won't know the difference.
Good catch. It is the tire circumference that controls wheel speed. However, the dounut spare definitely has a smaller diameter and thus circumference. It will spin more times per mile than the regular tires.


Also false. The transmission only has one speed sensor, a magnetic pickup on the final drive. If tires of different sizes are mounted the differential spins exactly half way between the speed of the two tires:

Differential (mechanical device) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What does happen is the planet gears in the differential rotate on the carrier shaft, and this can generate significant heat and eventually lead to failure since the gears do not ride on bearings. This is not a concern in low speed driving or short trips, but at high speeds or longer trips it is a concern.

In a car with a Limited Slip Differential, there are friction discs that resist the speed differential between the tires. Driving any significant distance with mis-matched tires or an undersize spare on a LSD can quickly cause the friction discs to wear out.
This is good information. Thanks.

This will cause a malfunction indicator light to illuminate letting you know that something isn't right, and will usually disable the ABS and stability/traction control systems. It will not cause permanent problems with the ABS system.
Good point - the car will disable these systems when one ABS hub is consistently spinning at a different speed from the other three hubs. When the hub returns to spinning at the same speed these systems will return to operation.

Google is only as accurate as the people posting the information.
It's on the internet - it must be true :)

Thanks for the clarifications.
 
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