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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How-To: Install Whiteline BHR93 Rear Sway Bar (2011-2016.5 Cruze)


Overview:
The rear axle has some anti-sway capability in the Gen1 Cruze, but ultimately allows a great deal of body roll. This ultimately causes cornering traction and performance to suffer. Whiteline makes a rear sway bar that is, dollar for dollar, the best handling modification you can make to your Cruze. Note that this tutorial explains the installation of the Whiteline BHR93 bar, for Cruzes with a build date of 11/2011 and newer. Check your door jamb for the build date before ordering a sway bar. This MAY fit on Cruzes older than 11/11, but you will need to check if the spring bosses are welded or pressed in before ordering.

Tools Required:
- 13/16" or 20mm socket and ratchet
- Torque wrench capable of 111 lb-ft
- Two jackstands and a jack
- A can of silicone spray (available at any auto store)
- A hammer
- Optional: A jack puck or piece of wood (I used this jack pad for $6.50 on Amazon.com)

Part Required:
- A Whiteline BHR93 Sway Bar (Available on BadNewsRacing.net)
- Loctite 242 Blue Thread Locker (~$5 on Amazon.com)

Procedure:
1. Lift the rear of the car on both sides, and allow the rear to rest on jackstands.

2. Using a jack puck or a block of wood, center the jack below the rear axle and lift very slightly; just enough so that the jack is supporting the weight of the axle instead of the rear shocks.


3. Using either a 13/16" or 20mm socket, remove the rear shock bolts



4. With the shock bolts removed, lower the jack and allow the axle to hang at its lowest position. Remove the springs and the top and bottom bushings. Start by pulling the spring from the top.



5. With the bottom bushing removed, you'll see the spring boss. This is simply pressed into the perch; give it a few whacks with a hammer from the side and it will pop right out.


6. Clean up the hole where the boss is pressed into, and tap the new bosses in with a hammer.



7. Slide the lower bushings back over the bosses, and liberally spray silicone grease over them. This will allow the spring to pop back on with little effort.


8. Reinstall the top bushing, and slide the spring back onto of the bottom bushing as shown below. Be sure that the top of the spring is centered with the top bushing.


9. Lift the axle back up using the jack, line up the shocks with the holes, and reinstall the shock bolts. Torque to 111 lb-ft + 60 degrees.


10. Apply some Loctite blue 242 removable thread locker to the bolts supplied with the sway bar.



11. Use the bolts to secure the sway bar in the position shown below and tighten securely. Note, this orientation is technically "backwards." The bar can be installed either facing the front, or facing the rear of the car. It's really up to you how you want to install it. It will clear the exhaust and will fit fine either way.


Enjoy your new handling improvement!
 

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Super Moderator
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Great write-up as always, Xtreme!

Do you have a sense of how much unsprung weight this mod adds?
 

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Great right up!!! This seems easy even though the springs come out, great time to add some drop springs too huh...

I did a rear bar on my truck and I know totally different platform, but it really ties the front and rear together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great write-up as always, Xtreme!

Do you have a sense of how much unsprung weight this mod adds?
I'd say somewhere in the range of 5 pounds; however much the bar, two aluminum bosses, and two bolts weigh. I didn't actually measure it.

Great right up!!! This seems easy even though the springs come out, great time to add some drop springs too huh...

I did a rear bar on my truck and I know totally different platform, but it really ties the front and rear together.
I'm not a fan of lowered springs personally due to how little suspension travel these cars have in the first place and how easily it is to upset the chassis if you hit a bump in a corner while lowered, but this did really tie everything together. It helps that I have the two upper and one rear lower Ultra Racing chassis bars.
 

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Xtreme, can you describe the insulator between your jack and chassis? It looks like a hockey puck.
 

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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Pucks make the best jack pads. They're borderline indestructible and dirt cheap.

This looks like a potential modification in the near future. I've got a massive 1.25" bar on my Cobalt - having a rear bar on the Cruze would add an extra bit of rotation.

Lowering springs are great if they're done right (i.e. Pedders, Powell and SSC springs, on Cobalts) - many are not - and you need the shocks/struts to handle them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Xtreme, can you describe the insulator between your jack and chassis? It looks like a hockey puck.
It's an actual jack pad, made of hard rubber.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MA232WY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Pucks make the best jack pads. They're borderline indestructible and dirt cheap.

This looks like a potential modification in the near future. I've got a massive 1.25" bar on my Cobalt - having a rear bar on the Cruze would add an extra bit of rotation.

Lowering springs are great if they're done right (i.e. Pedders, Powell and SSC springs, on Cobalts) - many are not - and you need the shocks/struts to handle them.
The key being, you need the shocks/struts to handle them, and 95% of people don't have those. I also have issue with the balljoint angle and loss of dynamic camber on lowered cars with macpherson struts. We have enough understeer as it is without losing dynamic camber.
 

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I've got the 2014 diesel if that makes a difference. Knocked the old bushing out from the bottom and it will come out between the coils. Slip the new one in and carefully use the bolt to pull it into place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've got the 2014 diesel if that makes a difference. Knocked the old bushing out from the bottom and it will come out between the coils. Slip the new one in and carefully use the bolt to pull it into place.
I think that's the part the manufacturer wants to avoid. If you aren't very careful, you can mangle the new boss when you're tightening the sway bar instead of pulling it into its correct position. Getting the springs off only takes you another 10-15 minutes and allows you to hammer the new bosses correctly into their position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
According to the fitment guide, you put your bar on backwards.

http://www.whiteline.com.au/docs/install_guides/Z5265.pdf
Ha, I didn't even think it would fit the other way around. I might go rotate it tomorrow and take another picture, as long as it clears the aero cover that the Eco has in that spot. I don't think it matters which way it goes as long as it doesn't hit something when the suspension is compressed. There are a good 6 inches to go before the bar hits the exhaust pipe.
 

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I did mine 2 years ago. I used loctite and tightened them good. Was getting a little clicking noise from the back. Had to re torque the bolts down.
 
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