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Hello everyone. Can anyone tell me how to take off the valve cover of a LE2 1.4L Chevy Cruze engine? And are there any special tools I will require?
It's quite involved, requires special tools to do PROPERLY, and numerous parts to do so.

Why are looking to take it off? I'm happy to help but very curious to know what's really going on before investing more time to make sure you're successful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello everyone. Can anyone tell me how to take off the valve cover of a LE2 1.4L Chevy Cruze engine? And are there any special tools I will require?
It's quite involved, requires special tools to do PROPERLY, and numerous parts to do so.

Why are looking to take it off? I'm happy to help but very curious to know what's really going on before investing more time to make sure you're successful.
This has been requested by the customs department in my country. I imported the engine which came out of a 2016 chevy Cruze but before customs allows me to have it, the valve cover must be taken off for them to inspect, to be sure no illegal stuff is being imported. So I just need to go with correct tools take it off they take a look and I put it back on then they will release it. So basically it's an engine that is not in a vehicle so I assume it's much simpler.
 

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Ok, that stinks. I would really be asking them if there was an alternative method.

Removing the valve cover requires removing the PCV hose assembly, which is a tamper resistant part and meant to be replaced once removed. It's connectors are usually heavily damaged during removal. Or you need to extract tamper proof bolts and remove it that way, and then find appropriate replacement bolts.
You need to remove the vacuum pump, which requires replacing the seals when you reinstall it.
You need to remove the ignition coils.
You need to remove the fuel rail/injector assemblies. It is possible to do this without the special tools but not recommended. Regardless of done with the tools or without you'll need new seals. If done without special tools you're likely to get debris in the injectors if you take apart the easy way. If you take it apart the proper way but put it back together without the tools you're almost garaunteed to develop a combustion leak.
You need to remove the turbo coolant pipe and then replace it's seal when you go back together.
You'll need valve cover gaskets, RTV and camshaft actuator oil seals for when you go back together as well.
Best case scenario, even considering it's out of the car, you're probably looking at 2hrs to come apart and go back together.(though depending on your skill and comfort level it could be 2hrs just to get the cover off)
 

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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@maven @Blasirl thanks so much guys. Yes it was definitely too much to do a valve cover opening so they just let me release spark plug. So it went well...kinda. They have scanners on the way so we will no longer have to open an engine they would just scan the engine to see if anything illegal is in it. However, my socket to remove the spark plug wasn't working, can anyone help? Was I using the incorrect size or length? It fit in the hole and covered the spark plug but just wasn't making a connection to turn the plug and was just spinning.
 

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I don't think I've ever seen 10mm spark plugs in a car before.

And I've never seen 14mm plugs with 14mm hex.
I'm used to 5/8 or 13/16 hex for 14mm plugs, 18mm for 12mm plugs.

I guess now I know not to be shocked when I see how small the plugs are in a few years.
 

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I don't think I've ever seen 10mm spark plugs in a car before.

And I've never seen 14mm plugs with 14mm hex.
I'm used to 5/8 or 13/16 hex for 14mm plugs, 18mm for 12mm plugs.

I guess now I know not to be shocked when I see how small the plugs are in a few years.
You still haven't seen 10mm thread plugs. The LE2 uses 12mm thread plugs with a 14mm hex.
GM standard for years has been 14mm thread with 16mm(5/8”) hex.

GM doesn't use a plug with an 18mm hex(at least not in remotely recent history or memory.) 18mm hex is mostly a power sports/motorcycle size, with probably some random old Nissans and Volvo's thrown in for good measure.
 

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My motorcycle was 5/8 I beleive. It wasn't the bigger size.
Highly likely...5/8 is very common. But 18mm plugs are widely used by Honda, on current bikes and all the way back the to the 60s/70s, used by the Cagiva group, Ducati, BMW and most Euro bikes that used related engines, Ferrari has used 18mm in many of it's highest production engine from 80s/90s, Lamborghini, BMW....Etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi guys, thanks so much for all the help. I bought a 14mm deep socket and it worked perfectly. It wasn't even a spark plug socket and still it was able to do the job easily. I really, really appreciate the help. ? this forum as been invaluable
 

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It's quite involved, requires special tools to do PROPERLY, and numerous parts to do so.

Why are looking to take it off? I'm happy to help but very curious to know what's really going on before investing more time to make sure you're successful.
I'm curious about this fuel rail on my 2016 le2. I put it back on not knowing I'd need to replace the o rings on the injectors. And now I'm getting a low fuel pressure during crank code. When I put the new o rings on is there anything I will need to know. Maybe about applying pressure one way or another. Or just let the bolts do the job?
 
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