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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


Overview:
The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


Tools Required:
- E10 socket (A set is available on Amazon.com)
- Ratchet
- T45 Torx bit (A set is available on Amazon.com)
- Lb-ft Torque wrench (Available on Amazon.com)
- In-lb torque wrench (Available on Amazon.com)


Part Required:
GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


Procedure:
Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


Start the car and check for leaks.

Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

Old vs New photos:

 

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Nice write-up! Really demonstrates how simple some repairs can be. This will save many owners a lot of time and money paying a shop rate to have this done.

Does a significant amount of oil drain from the block when you pull the line out?

This is one of those cases where the savings from doing it yourself can cover the cost of the tools needed. Between the savings of an "on-line" price for the line and likely 1.5 hours of shop rate labor, you could buy a nice 3/8" drive torque wrench and the required bit sets and still come out ahead.

That's the approach I've taken with most of my repairs in the past and I now have a huge assortment of tools that cover pretty much any reasonable job. Add to that the fun of learning along the way and the satisfaction of accomishment, and it's a win win.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice write-up! Really demonstrates how simple some repairs can be. This will save many owners a lot of time and money paying a shop rate to have this done.

Does a significant amount of oil drain from the block when you pull the line out?

This is one of those cases where the savings from doing it yourself can cover the cost of the tools needed. Between the savings of an "on-line" price for the line and likely 1.5 hours of shop rate labor, you could buy a nice 3/8" drive torque wrench and the required bit sets and still come out ahead.

That's the approach I've taken with most of my repairs in the past and I now have a huge assortment of tools that cover pretty much any reasonable job. Add to that the fun of learning along the way and the satisfaction of accomishment, and it's a win win.
This replacement is indeed very simple. The only two potential trouble areas are making sure that you don't scrape dirt into the turbo housing when you wipe off the mating surface, and making sure you don't over-tighten the block bolt for the oil cooler line.

I didn't have any oil drain out of mine when I removed it. Made it a very clean install.

As a bonus to buying the tools to do this job, you use the same E10 socket to replace the valve cover.
 

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For anyone else who doesn't feel like buying E-sockets, an 8mm 12 point will fit the E10 head. The bolts for this replacement are not tight so there's no worry of stripping them.

Also, the cruzetalk recommended replacement of 3yr/50k miles I know has come from some experiences here, but honestly I think if it is not leaking then do not worry about it. The line will not blow off, and the rust seen in pictures is surface rust, nothing compromising to the strength of the tube. The worst I see happening is the example picture above, small spots of oil, so fix it when that happens.

With that said, I replaced mine to be proactive (I like the new sealing design) at 68k miles. I will be keeping my old line as a backup if I ever need one.
 

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I got a question. 1st did the old tube have a heat shield? Is is a bigger oil line? Of course it looks like you are one of the kings of write ups here. You are the man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For anyone else who doesn't feel like buying E-sockets, an 8mm 12 point will fit the E10 head. The bolts for this replacement are not tight so there's no worry of stripping them.

Also, the cruzetalk recommended replacement of 3yr/50k miles I know has come from some experiences here, but honestly I think if it is not leaking then do not worry about it. The line will not blow off, and the rust seen in pictures is surface rust, nothing compromising to the strength of the tube. The worst I see happening is the example picture above, small spots of oil, so fix it when that happens.

With that said, I replaced mine to be proactive (I like the new sealing design) at 68k miles. I will be keeping my old line as a backup if I ever need one.
A few reports have come in with failed turbos from what is suspected to be coked oil feed lines that starved the turbo of oil. That concern is part of my proactive replacement recommendation.

I got a question. 1st did the old tube have a heat shield? Is is a bigger oil line? Of course it looks like you are one of the kings of write ups here. You are the man.
The old line is the same diameter from what I could tell and did not have a heat shield.

Thanks!
 

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Did you notice if the exhaust manifold bolt-spacers were stainless steel-in the pictures they look rusty, reason I ask I was just looking at a 2015 and noticed copper plated bolts on the exhaust manifold, I'm concerned they may have had a bolt seizure problem if those are not stainless
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did you notice if the exhaust manifold bolt-spacers were stainless steel-in the pictures they look rusty, reason I ask I was just looking at a 2015 and noticed copper plated bolts on the exhaust manifold, I'm concerned they may have had a bolt seizure problem if those are not stainless
I believe they are stainless. They sure aren't rusted.
 

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Ford was using two O'Rings in their AC line quick couplers with constant failures so tried going to three. Wasn't aware Cruze was using O-Rings in a red hot turbo oil line and this is the problem.

Wouldn't be a problem at all if they stuck with a good old fashion double flare fitting. But thanks for the post, wasn't aware of this and something else to look out for. Always think of that space shuttle when O-Rings are mentioned. Not bad in the oil filter cartridge, get changed frequently. Neoprene or even other elastic materials dry up and change to dust over time.
 

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Completed. Though my old one is exactly same as the new one minus the heat shield. GM modifying parts one step at a time as problems arise? My Cruzer is a 2012 2lt but not sure of the maintenance because I bought it used and it was originally a Hertz rental.
 

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One major O-Ring job we had was with a 93 GM 4.3L V-6 using a single O-Ring under each valve clips. Got a Fel-Pro that not only had new O'Rings, but those umbrella type seals as used on a 41 Chevy. This was an all day job, took darn near a half a day to remove the valve covers. Used compressed air to keep the valves closed.

Engine only had 60K on it and was consuming a quart of oil every 600 miles, after this job, less than a quart every 5,000 miles, major job was using plenty of SeaFoam to decarbonize the engine, was only getting around 110 psi in a compression check that shot up to 150. Got rid of this thing with 220K miles on it and still was not using oil.

So I am wondering if Fel-Pro mades an oil tube for the Cruze. Replacing one POS part for another just as bad is not a viable solution. And if above the turbo, what about engine fires? Sounds like yet another recall is in order.

Like I said before, I hate O-Rings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Assuming this isn't something that's covered under the powertrain
It is covered, but for $25 and 30 minutes of work start to finish, it's cheaper and more convenient than taking my car to the dealer, and we will soon have quite a few members whose cars will need this repair done out of warranty.
 

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Oil feed tube. Turbocharger Oil Line. GM part number 55592600
1.4 LITER TURBO. MSRP $38.22, your cost $32.69



For all the part listed in item 10, just the line itself is $10.47.

Looks like a standard piece of 3/16" brake line, turbo end is okay, standard caliper type fitting. But what's wrong with the engine end? Just the O-Ring? If so, why not just replace the O-Ring and smear the outside end of it with a good grade of aviation gasket maker.

That boss in the engine looks large enough to hold a fitting for a standard double flare fitting, can be drilled and tapped. Do this, and it will never leak.

Ha, am tempted to take mine in anyway, just so some exec at GM would talk to the engineer that approved this, you may have saved us a couple of cents, but costing us millions in warranty work. Really mickey mouse.

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Oil feed tube. Turbocharger Oil Line. GM part number 55592600
1.4 LITER TURBO. MSRP $38.22, your cost $32.69

For all the part listed in item 10, just the line itself is $10.47.

Looks like a standard piece of 3/16" brake line, turbo end is okay, standard caliper type fitting. But what's wrong with the engine end? Just the O-Ring? If so, why not just replace the O-Ring and smear the outside end of it with a good grade of aviation gasket maker.

That boss in the engine looks large enough to hold a fitting for a standard double flare fitting, can be drilled and tapped. Do this, and it will never leak.

Ha, am tempted to take mine in anyway, just so some exec at GM would talk to the engineer that approved this, you may have saved us a couple of cents, but costing us millions in warranty work. Really mickey mouse.
The thing about it is that the new line has this heat shield. Keeps the heat from the turbo from coking/carbonizing the oil inside the line after you shut the engine off, at least for the length of line covered. Plus, the revised line for newer models has two o-rings instead of one, so at least for those members, replacing the entire line makes more sense than just replacing an o-ring.

If you already have the updated design, replacing just the o-rings makes more sense, but are those copper washers on the turbo housing re-usable?
 
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