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[SUB]I thought this article was very helpful in understanding how the turbo works on the 1.4 litre cruise:

How Turbochargers Work - HowStuffWorks

Hope you enjoy.

I wonder whether the blades in our turbo are made of metal or ceramic...and whether it has a cooler to cool the air being pumped by the turbo before it gets into the engine?[/SUB]
 

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Interesting article. Good refresh on my knowledge! Didn't know about ceramic blades...wonder if we have those too. I do know we have an air to air intercooler though. But even that can become heat soaked in long stop and go traffic in 95+ temps. You'll notice it next time you go to step on it after you get out of the traffic...more possibility for knock and less air molecules so smaller boom...lol.


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88 Supra uses air bearings. Air bearings are not listed in the parts manual. Of more interest to me is what is the Cruze using for the shaft bearings. If they seize, rather than getting a boost, you get a stall.
 

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88 Supra uses air bearings. Air bearings are not listed in the parts manual. Of more interest to me is what is the Cruze using for the shaft bearings. If they seize, rather than getting a boost, you get a stall.
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The supra uses a journal bearing ct26 some others use the ct20 turbo and just like the Cruze they both use a journal bearing design like most oem turbos used today.
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Do know the one in the Supra has been trouble free with a 28 year history to back this up. Looks like the one in the Cruze is good.

Friend had a 86 Chrysler New Yorker with the 2.2 L Turbo, died shortly after his 12 month warranty, cost a fortune to have it replaced, but then died again about 8 months later. Got fed up with it and elected to trade it off only to learn his trade in value was next to zero.
 

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Most turbo failures are a result of:

A) overspeeding
B) Insufficient lubrication (clogged oil lines, PCV backpressure, lubricating system design flaw)

Don't push the turbo past its intended design limits and keep it well lubricated, and most turbos worth their snuff will live a long, happy life.

I've got an old Mistubishi TD04 going on 235k/17 years now. No shaft play, still boosts strong too.
 

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Most turbo failures are a result of:

A) overspeeding
B) Insufficient lubrication (clogged oil lines, PCV backpressure, lubricating system design flaw)

Don't push the turbo past its intended design limits and keep it well lubricated, and most turbos worth their snuff will live a long, happy life.

I've got an old Mistubishi TD04 going on 235k/17 years now. No shaft play, still boosts strong too.
This is how I blew up mine. Subaru decided to add inline filters in the banjo bolts to the turbo and servicing/cleaning them was never intended. Long story short 70K to 110K it's normal to lose a turbo from starvation. Since the filters were unknown to even dealership techs, they usually would slap another turbo on and it would die the same death in less than a month time frame.
 

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Hi how do you know or tell if the turbo is well lubricated?
Thanks:)
If your engine is well lubed then so is the turbocharger
 
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