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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got the check engine light a few days ago.

I replaced the valve cover however I didn't have a torque wrench so I did it by hand I originally read it as foot lbs so I am only new realizing I may have WAY over tightened it out of ignorance. Snug tight + 6oclock.

There is no bead of oil that I can trace but in certain areas around the seem it glistens as if it is leaking oil. I did tighten them in order though...

I need to do this again but my question is can I use this valve cover again or did I compress the gasket too much to be re used.

I also bought the RTV silicone and torque wrench and plan on doing it right this time.

I know this is a big face palm but any advice would be appreciated Im going to express order all the parts today. So I can work on it tomorrow.
 

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The 'gasket' is a 'O' ring and when the bolts are tightened the cover actually seats against the head. So, the 'O' ring, in this case, should have no damage.
You may have, by overtightening, cracked the plastic cam cover around the bolt hole bosses.
The cracks may be almost impossible to see but the oil will find a way out.

The odds are in your favor though since the cover has metal sleeves in the bolt holes to prevent cover damage.

OK.....now that that is out of the way, remove the cover and start over. Be certain that the head where the gasket meets it is absolutely clean.
Wash the cam cover and gasket with a generous dose of brake clean.
Flush each threaded bolt hole out with brake clean.....if you don't have compressed air, blow through a vacuum line into each hole to dry it out.

Cleaning the holes is important because if there is any oil in them, the bolt, upon installation, will compress the oil and, since you cannot compress a liquid, something has to give. The 'something' will be threads tearing out of the head, followed by you tearing hair out of your own head.

Gasket sealer (rtv) is to only be dabbed where there is a sharp turn that the 'O' ring must follow.....these spots are on the cam drive side of the engine (right side if seated in the car looking forward).
Dabbed means just what I said......very little required.....the rest of the 'O' ring is to be dry, against the dry head surface.

If you are using a torque wrench, only use one rated for inch pounds.....a foot pound wrench is nowhere near accurate at the low readings.

Good luck!

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The 'gasket' is a 'O' ring and when the bolts are tightened the cover actually seats against the head. So, the 'O' ring, in this case, should have no damage.
You may have, by overtightening, cracked the plastic cam cover around the bolt hole bosses.
The cracks may be almost impossible to see but the oil will find a way out.

The odds are in your favor though since the cover has metal sleeves in the bolt holes to prevent cover damage.

OK.....now that that is out of the way, remove the cover and start over. Be certain that the head where the gasket meets it is absolutely clean.
Wash the cam cover and gasket with a generous dose of brake clean.
Flush each threaded bolt hole out with brake clean.....if you don't have compressed air, blow through a vacuum line into each hole to dry it out.

Cleaning the holes is important because if there is any oil in them, the bolt, upon installation, will compress the oil and, since you cannot compress a liquid, something has to give. The 'something' will be threads tearing out of the head, followed by you tearing hair out of your own head.

Gasket sealer (rtv) is to only be dabbed where there is a sharp turn that the 'O' ring must follow.....these spots are on the cam drive side of the engine (right side if seated in the car looking forward).
Dabbed means just what I said......very little required.....the rest of the 'O' ring is to be dry, against the dry head surface.

If you are using a torque wrench, only use one rated for inch pounds.....a foot pound wrench is nowhere near accurate at the low readings.

Good luck!

Rob
Thank you Robby for the well detailed report. Much appreciated

Looks like there was a delay with shipping so I wont be able to fix this until the weekend.

I have noticed some very light oil pooling near the bolts. I cleaned it and am monitoring it.

Also, I noticed there was oil in the center of the valve cover by the spark plugs. Some oil actually got into the spark plugs. I see some burning signs by the end of the thread.

I really messed this up. I think I just didn't the cover right. The bolts were aligned so I though so was the cover but apparently I was wrong. Im buying another cover just in case it needs to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Also Here is the photo when I took the cover off the first time.

Am I suppose to try and scrape the area where the arrows are pointing to? I just wiped down the oil when I installed the cover the first time. I didn't use brake cleaner. Will break cleaner clean that or will I have to scrape it? Will scrapping it further damage it?

I never removed the previous sealant where the circles are...

20180626_213007 wm.jpg
 

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The previous sealant where the circles are must be removed. Either a plastic scraper or solvent on a rag. Be very careful not to scratch the sealing surface. I believe this is the only area where sealant has to be replaced, the rest of the gasket goes on dry. There's a large how to complete with pictures in the 1.4L engine section. That's why you may not get a lot of responses to your thread. We call these How To's on this tread. Searching google will probably take you to the cruzetalk site especially if you use the search bar on the top right portion of the main screen..

Get a can of brake clean and put a one of those directional straws on it. Or spray the solvent on a rag and wipe. You want the bolt holes clean and free from oil, so you don't damage the threads when you install a new cover. As for the other black marks around each hole, I'd make sure they are smooth, but I wouldn't polish so hard you sand the surface.

Blow the bolt holes out or use solvent, and blow the solvent out. These holes easily strip when you put the bolts back in, that's what Robby is talking about in his tread.

You could use carb cleaner in the holes as well. I know carb cleaner cans have "positional straws" to attach to the can. Get the holes clean and DRY though.. Or you may have thread problems.
 
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