Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Insurance Institute for Highway safety, rated the Cruze as Marginal. So what happened from 2011 the brand new Cruze to 2013 that made the Cruze so bad on safety? It's the same car for three years. They were saying it was good the first two years?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,704 Posts
Different kind of test.

The Cruze is very good in all areas. However, that test was frontal offset crash as opposed to just frontal crash. The Cruze earned the highest rating in a case of it crashing head first into a wall or another vehicle. However, that particular crash was if the Cruze hits the end of the wall with a small section of the front (not the whole thing). The idea is to reflect how the car would take the impact in a frontal collision where both parties try to avoid the impact and only hit head on in a front corner. The Cruze performs "marginally" in that scenario.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,595 Posts
Different kind of test.

The Cruze is very good in all areas. However, that test was frontal offset crash as opposed to just frontal crash. The Cruze earned the highest rating in a case of it crashing head first into a wall or another vehicle. However, that particular crash was if the Cruze hits the end of the wall with a small section of the front (not the whole thing). The idea is to reflect how the car would take the impact in a frontal collision where both parties try to avoid the impact and only hit head on in a front corner. The Cruze performs "marginally" in that scenario.
As does almost every other car on the road today. The "offset frontal crash test" is only a couple of years old so almost every car on the road is failing this test - it wasn't a design criteria for them even though most "head on" crashes on two lane roads fall into this category.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,915 Posts
As does almost every other car on the road today. The "offset frontal crash test" is only a couple of years old so almost every car on the road is failing this test - it wasn't a design criteria for them even though most "head on" crashes on two lane roads fall into this category.
yes and the offset percent matters too as to how safe the car is. I think video below is similar to the test that they are doing. Problem with previous testing is most people in crashes try to swerve to avoid and don't hit square on, so the offset crash test makes the most sense. Who wouldn't try to avoid an accident?
Chevrolet Cruze | 2011 | 20% Small Overlap Crash Test | NHTSA High Speed Camera | CrashNet1 - YouTube
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,157 Posts
The test is only partially valid. I would like to see what happens if the other vehicle was collapsing up as well. Solid objects are usually hit on the passengers side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
The test is only partially valid. I would like to see what happens if the other vehicle was collapsing up as well. Solid objects are usually hit on the passengers side.

This is a most valid point. This test is *not* a simulation of a "country road" accident exactly for this reason. The impact severity would be roughly half of what is seen here if it were two equivalent vehicles each crushing in their safety zone. This test is more akin to hitting a bridge pier with no intervening standard crash barrier. It appears to me the highest potential damage is to the driver's left foot - other than that, the Cruze seems to do very well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
The test is only partially valid. I would like to see what happens if the other vehicle was collapsing up as well. Solid objects are usually hit on the passengers side.
However, one perfect example of this new test was Princess Diana's car crash...driver's front quarter into a solid cement column.
 
  • Like
Reactions: obermd and Merc6

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
However, one perfect example of this new test was Princess Diana's car crash...driver's front quarter into a solid cement column.
Actually, that accident was a perfect example of why you should always wear a seatbelt (and, depending on which report you believe, that you shouldn't get in a car driven by someone who is intoxicated).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
916 Posts
Anyone who doubt's how important crash protection is should go watch some footage of the Russian Dash Cam's that are on YouTube. Yes, the majority of the people in these crashes are idiots but really points how important the engineering is when it goes to protect you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: obermd

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Call me crazy, but I want the car to perform well on both sides, no matter if I am a passenger, driver, or in a different country where the steering wheel is on the "other" side and or driving on the "other" side of the road. Before we go down the rabbit hole of rationale, if playing crash test dummy for the day, would you rather be in a car that does really well or marginal or poor? Arguing whether the test is valid or not is kind of silly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
661 Posts
yes and the offset percent matters too as to how safe the car is. I think video below is similar to the test that they are doing. Problem with previous testing is most people in crashes try to swerve to avoid and don't hit square on, so the offset crash test makes the most sense. Who wouldn't try to avoid an accident?
Chevrolet Cruze | 2011 | 20% Small Overlap Crash Test | NHTSA High Speed Camera | CrashNet1 - YouTube
a drunk, a sleeper, or a complete idiot in other words
 
  • Like
Reactions: spacedout

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
in this cars price and size range has anthing recieved a good rating in this new partial offset test? I actually recall seeing that many other much larger and more expensive cars have recieved marginal or poor ratings. I went on youtube and watched the actual videos for several cars during this test. I came away impressed by how well the cruze held up. It showed some inflection but the overall cabin integrity appeared to remain mostly intact. It faired better than most in the videos i watched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Yes, there was one car that ruled them all, but as in the traditions of Beelzebub, Lucifer, Nosferatu, Sauron, and Voldemort, it shall go unnamed. Maybe if by removing the vowels it will be safe and not so “Precious.”
Here goes nothing.....C_V_C. Ya meet the nicest people in or on a H_N_D_, but they might all be, “Of the Devil.”
I feel like a big evil eye of Mordor is watching me!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
While this small offset crash test is relatively new and the type of crash is not necessarily a high volume one, this type of impact has been almost always fatal to the occupant on that side of the vehicle, hence the reason for the test. This type of crash not only concentrates the impact forces on the structure, but it also induces very violent spinning vectors to the vehicle. Most cars spin more than 90 degrees away from the impact site. The forces are nearly equal to a side impact crash. There were multiple reasons for the compact cars failing to meet the test criteria.
1. Some seat belts spooled too much belt out allowing the occupant to enter the crush zone.
2. Some cars didn't deploy the side curtain and side impact air bags in this crash and allowed the occupant to hit the door and side window hard enough to cause life threatening injury.
3. Some cars' bodies deformed so much that the occupant was struck by the collapsing structure. One car had the steering column displaced by 5 inches and the driver missed the air bag allowing the head to strike the windshield/dash.

This information was available on the IIHS website back in early March, so I'm sort of baffled by the timing of the report. Perhaps it just came out because of new model year introductions. Honda re-engineered the '13 Civic body one year after bringing out the new generation in 2012 just to meet this test. As I said in another post, I believe this is why Chevy has delayed the second gen. Cruze until the 2016 MY. For what it's worth, the Dart barely made the grade as the test tore the door hinges out of the body in the test.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
Not sure where you saw that but the Cruze is listed as a Top Safety Pick. IIHS-HLDI
If you look at the details of the report, you'll see that the Cruze scored "Marginal" on the small offset crash test. This doesn't keep a car out of the "Top Safety Pick" category. IIHS now has the "Top Safety Pick +" category for cars that exceed all of the tests.

The Times They Are A Changin'
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
916 Posts
How many of you will rush out and sell your car because of this new test? Not me that is for sure.
Not likely...simply for the fact that I don't want to drive a Civic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: obermd

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,595 Posts
This is a most valid point. This test is *not* a simulation of a "country road" accident exactly for this reason. The impact severity would be roughly half of what is seen here if it were two equivalent vehicles each crushing in their safety zone. This test is more akin to hitting a bridge pier with no intervening standard crash barrier. It appears to me the highest potential damage is to the driver's left foot - other than that, the Cruze seems to do very well.
Head on collisions have double the kinetic energy of a single car slamming into a fixed object. Both cars are moving towards each other so the impact severity would comparable to a car crashing into a bridge abutment. The crumple zones in the cars will dissipate a lot of the impact but you are at double the speed. The real issue with this type of crash is that there are powerful sheer and torque forces that come into play because the center of gravity is offset from the impact and most cars simply cannot handle the sheering forces that are created.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top