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Mine was like that too. Had whole intake replaced when valve in PCV system became lost and oil was collecting at the throttle body. Powertrain Warrantied

Is that water puddles on intake?
 

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Ok. I'll go talk to my dealership and see what they have to say. Yeah, I wanted to see how bad it was. If it was just split but not leaking, it should just pool the water in the crack, but if it was leaking, it should suck the water up. Which it seemed like it sucked it up. I don't notice a vacuum sound though, and it does seem to idle fine, but maybe under boost its leaking precious PSI's?
 

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If it was leaking air the car would set a lean code.......you are looking at a parting line where the halves were joined.....what you see doesn't matter and the sealing area evidently is sound.

To verify, get a can of carb cleaner.....install the nozzle extension tube and fire it into the area you suspect with the engine running.
If there is a leak, the idle speed will immediatly rise several hundred RPM and then fall back.

Rob
 

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I'm probably out to lunch on this but I was wondering if the engine out oxygen sensor would detect a lean condition, if it existed, and compensate by adjusting the fuel trim so a lean code would not be set due to a small intake manifold leak. Additionally, small air leaks in the intake manifold would be compensated by electronic adjustment of the throttle plate position at idle sort of like the idle air control function on older GM products with port fuel injection. Trim compensation can occur within the limitation of the injectors and/or software parameters. Therefore, if the manifold absolute pressure sensor or the mass airflow sensor did not detect an intake manifold leak (per the on board diagnostic calibration), the vehicle would run normally regardless of a small intake manifold leak. In fact, today's engines have such low intake manifold vacuum or even boost, manufactures install vacuum pumps on engines to provide vacuum for power brakes and other vacuum powered equipment. Having said that, the lean condition and carb cleaner trick does apply to engines with carburetors.
 

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I'm probably out to lunch on this but I was wondering if the engine out oxygen sensor would detect a lean condition, if it existed, and compensate by adjusting the fuel trim so a lean code would not be set due to a small intake manifold leak. Additionally, small air leaks in the intake manifold would be compensated by electronic adjustment of the throttle plate position at idle sort of like the idle air control function on older GM products with port fuel injection. Trim compensation can occur within the limitation of the injectors and/or software parameters. Therefore, if the manifold absolute pressure sensor or the mass airflow sensor did not detect an intake manifold leak (per the on board diagnostic calibration), the vehicle would run normally regardless of a small intake manifold leak. In fact, today's engines have such low intake manifold vacuum or even boost, manufactures install vacuum pumps on engines to provide vacuum for power brakes and other vacuum powered equipment. Having said that, the lean condition and carb cleaner trick does apply to engines with carburetors.
Carb cleaner trick will work on F/I engines as well. But yeah, it will adjust for small air leaks, and beyond that will set a code. In fact, the PCV rupture disc creates a very small air leak, but will usually set a code on these cars, which may sometimes go back off once the car compensates fuel trims for it.
 
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