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2017 Hatch with push button start.

I just noticed today that the steering wheel won't lock after I shut the car off. Is this normal on a push button start vehicle? I have no idea, never having had push button start before.

Last month I got an alignment, and after leaving the alignment shop, it was worse than before. I had to bring it right back. They blamed the screw up on the new alignment tech, because she forgot to lock the steering wheel. She was cute, so I didn't mind going back. lol Now I'm wondering how you are supposed to get the steering wheel to lock for an alignment, because I can't get it to lock either.
 

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No it should not lock. I own several that do not lock. Been common on GM and others manufacturers for years now. Really has nothing to do with push to start either or having a keyed ignition. My '08 Civic is keyed ignition, steering does not lock, '11 GMC Sierra SLT, keyed, does not lock, '13 Cruze push to start, does not lock, and '15 Impala LTZ, push to start, does not lock.
 

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The locks were implemented decades ago when it was easy to hotwire and start a car. Locking the wheel was somewhat of a theft deterrent and supposed to make the car un-drivable if the engine was running, but was pretty easy to break the column on most cars. With the newer electronics and anti-theft it appears they're moving away from locking columns. Probably saves the automaker money and might be considered a safety consideration with push-button start where you wouldn't want the wheel to accidentally lock while the car is moving is someone accidentally pressed the ignition button.
 

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My 13 Cruze Eco did it and my 17 Accord Sport does it but after a certain time frame (16 or 17) the push to start Accords don't lock when the wheel is turned after the ignition is off.


The locks were implemented decades ago when it was easy to hotwire and start a car. Locking the wheel was somewhat of a theft deterrent and supposed to make the car un-drivable if the engine was running, but was pretty easy to break the column on most cars. With the newer electronics and anti-theft it appears they're moving away from locking columns. Probably saves the automaker money and might be considered a safety consideration with push-button start where you wouldn't want the wheel to accidentally lock while the car is moving is someone accidentally pressed the ignition button.
LOL AUTOVLOG "what happens when you.... with a Fusion" (video series) pretty much proved why this would suck to lock a moving car.
 
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