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Hello everyone, I'm a woman, I don't know much about cars. I need a husband for this stuff. What does it mean to get my car serviced? Is it just an oil change and fluid check? I have a 2015 Chev Cruz with 75,400 miles and there is a sticker on my car saying to get it serviced at 75,500 miles. If it's the Lord's will I want to give this car to my child for graduation, so I'm trying to keep it up.
 

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...there is a sticker on my car saying to get it serviced at 75,500 miles.
If you look closely at the sticker, it should have a vendor listed on it, and it may have other details, such as "oil" mentioned. Typically, these types of stickers are used to remind you when your next oil change is due.

Doug

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Hello everyone, I'm a woman, I don't know much about cars. I need a husband for this stuff. What does it mean to get my car serviced? Is it just an oil change and fluid check? I have a 2015 Chev Cruz with 75,400 miles and there is a sticker on my car saying to get it serviced at 75,500 miles. If it's the Lord's will I want to give this car to my child for graduation, so I'm trying to keep it up.
Angel, your Owners manual will have all the maintenance intervals listed for you. Here's one to keep!
 

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Yup. Air in the tires expands and contracts with temperature. Best thing to do is check when cold, 3-4 psi change with temperatures is normal. Only way around the psi difference is to air up with nitrogen and get all atmospheric air out. But that technique is rife with opinions....
 

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Dry air is about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 1% other gases, mostly argon. Nitrogen and dry air both behave as ideal gases at these temperatures and pressures. Their physical properties are nearly equal. The only advantage I can see for nitrogen is, it's moisture-free. The residual water vapor coming in with un-dried compressed air must be the source of higher pressure variability in air-inflated tires. Either nitrogen or air will increase in pressure in a hot tire and decrease in a cold tire. No practical measurement of tire pressures at different temperatures could find a difference between nitrogen and dry air. Unless there's something odd going on - like the rubber is adsorbing and desorbing oxygen - but I don't think that's an issue. In short, it's the absence of water vapor that matters, not the 100% nitrogen.
 

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Yup. Air in the tires expands and contracts with temperature. Best thing to do is check when cold, 3-4 psi change with temperatures is normal. Only way around the psi difference is to air up with nitrogen and get all atmospheric air out. But that technique is rife with opinions....
Unless you're driving a race car or a jet aircraft, don't bother with nitrogen. Nitrogen expands (increases pressure in an enclosed container) and contracts (decreases pressure in an enclosed container) with temperature changes at the same rate as all other gasses. Where nitrogen has a very very miniscule edge over the normal atmospheric gas mix is in corrosion. When I say miniscule I mean you might see corrosion inside the wheels after a decade using humid, salt laden air found in the tropics near an ocean. In this situation, however, you'll probably have other corrosion and rust problems long before the wheels start to corrode.
 
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