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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm new here and this is my first post.

May 2015, saw a mouse above the windshield wiper and didn't think much of it. The next day I found a turd in my cup holder and noticed the issue from there on. Droppings were everywhere; from floor mats, back seat to the trunk. I work at night and I guess I just never noticed it. I hardly ate in my car and wasn't that messy.

The following day I saw that mouse under the hood. I tried to chase it out, but it hid well. I later caught it with a Victor snap trap and cleaned out the car the best I could. I found and moved torn tissue under my subwoofer and just trashed my trunk liner because I was disgusted and did want to deal with it. I honestly thought that was the last of it...

Since May, I've done the best to keep my car vacuumed and clean but kept finding droppings. It became frustrating and some what depressing, because all I could think of was dying of hantavirus.

Finally I decided to remove the carpet and find out where it might be coming in from. I found droppings everywhere under the carpet. They chewed through the foam and were able to go from the front to the back easily. So after removing the carpet, I washed the carpet with detergent and cleaned the bare floor. After, I used expanding pest foam and sealed all possible entries within the cabin and there were so many holes.

I found what might have been to possible entry; manual shifter cable grommet through the firewall. I foamed the **** out of it. So after that I left the car bare; no carpet, seats, stereo and console for a few days with traps, poison and bait set inside. No sign of activity for a few days with all the bait and poison untouched.

So I figure I resolved my issue. Today, I have a bare metal trunk, no passenger and back seats. I check almost every chance I get and just a couple of days ago I found a dead mouse caught in a Tom Cat trap which I duct-taped inside the trunk. Removed it completely and set another trap. 2 days later I caught another. The traps have a little bit of peanut butter on them.

The thing is... the trap was in my car for over a month with no signs of mice and just recently I caught the two. Does anyone have any suggestions on where I can find a 3D model of the chassis or something that can help me find entry points? I left the trunk vents untouched because it looks like a straight drop off and I can't image a mouse using suction cups and climbing up the steep walls.

HVAC is good, because my cabin air filter isn't damaged. I'm just wanting to stick a 2x4 on the throttle, and say good bye and watch it drive off a cliff. The really sad part is I still owe thousands on it. It isn't worth trading it in either, also I would hate to pass on this issue to the next owner.
 

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Wow that sucks. I haven't had this issue on my Cruze but I had one die inside the HVAC on another car. That was a nasty cleanup job.
 

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That's an awful problem to have. The few times I've found mice in my apartments, poison was always my go-to method. I'd leave lots of poison and traps around where the vehicle is parked. If that doesn't work, you may need to get a few cats to patrol the property.

I've heard of mic being an issue with vehicles that just sit, but never for a daily driver. If you don't drive it daily, maybe you should at least take it out for a drive once a day.
 

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I have two cats that patrol the house grounds. They eat some of them the rest are left as presents on the deck or door mats.

We have never had mice in the cars here.
(Farm with hay storage, hay fields, and woods)
 

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Rather than trying to mouse-proof the car, what about addressing the mice problem where you park? Even if they don't get inside, they can chew up things under the hood and leave you with an inoperative car. These buggers sound hungry, so they should be easy marks for poison bait.
 
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I had a starring contest with one in an Apartment and I won, it left. How long was the tail, these can be Rats. Yesterday we had a member thinking of trading up to the new CRUZE after having a mouse/rat in the Gen 1 HVAC
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, the situation sucks. I have a cat but he's strictly a house cat and only kills the spiders and crickets. The dog will more than likely maul his security cat partners.

Does anyone know where I could find detailed images of the chassis?

My car drives 212 Miles a day, 5 days a week for work; yes, I know that's crazy. I live in a rural area (desert) and I park in a fairly open area near a Sonic, Dakota, Ram, Sierra and Grand Cherokee. The environment is sand and shrubs with no barns or grass. All other vehicles are left alone. I'm guessing that the previous visitors left a scent so strong that it keeps attracting them.

A GoPro would be very helpful, but just can't afford one right now. IF anyone knows where I can find some detailed photos of the chassis, may you please attach or add a link. I would greatly appreciate it.

AND thank you all for your replies!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh yeah. I believe those little turd droppers are either Deer Mice or White Footed Mice.

Definitely not rats. Don't think I've ever seen a rat in my life.
 

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Rather weird, this one.
Although mice seem to like the coating found on car wiring harnesses they aren't drawn to it a source of sustenance.

First, I don't think a trap with food in the car is a good idea......it draws the critter into the car, looking for that odor.
It appears though, there is something else getting their attention since you indicate the other, nearby cars are unaffected.

My first guess is, are you using any type of deodorizers or air fresheners in the car.......you know, those things that clip to the air vents or hang from the mirror?
If so, you may have chosen a scent that is calling them, and, if so, obviously avoid deodorizers of any type.

Obviously seeds of any type in or stored near the car are a big no no.......they will haul the seeds into the car as it is good storage spot.

You indicate the cabin filter is undamaged, so that takes entry through the cowl out of the picture.
I doubt if entry is through any of the wiring or cable grommeted areas unless they chewed one up.......a mouse can get into any area their head fits through.....that is how they determine they can get through an obstacle.

Where the rear bumper cover meets the rear wheels.......if you remove the cover there are air exit vents on one or both sides of the fender extensions.
The vents have very thin, soft rubber flaps (all cars have this setup BTW) and a determined rodent wouldn't have to work too hard to enter the car through these...they lead into the trunk sides and, once in the trunk there are many ways to head to the interior.

So, since you are not seeing any real debris buildup under the hood, I'm stuck on something in the interior is getting their attention.......deodorizers, wipe on plastic treatments, leather or vinyl conditioners........

Best thoughts I can conjure up.

Rob
 

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Oh yeah. I believe those little turd droppers are either Deer Mice or White Footed Mice.

Definitely not rats. Don't think I've ever seen a rat in my life.
In Arizona you must be kidding? Usually a mouse is smaller and has a shorter tail but these are the ones that eat cars and Planes
--------------------------
One of the things we love most about living in Arizona is the fact that we live next door to lots of beautiful and unique local wildlife. Arizona’s desert environment is home to an amazing array of biodiversity among mammals, arthropods, reptiles, birds and more.
Deer, bighorn sheep, jackrabbits, and foxes are just some of the animals that call Arizona home. However, there are some less friendly four-legged neighbors that can quickly become a pest problem for Arizona homeowners.
Animals are considered pests when they start to compete with their human hosts, or pose a danger to humans or other animals. While most wild animals tend to stay well away from human interaction and thrive without human interaction, some pest become accustomed to humans and can even become dependent on them – and that’s where the problems start.
In this blog post, we will outline some of the most common rats and mice that we encounter on the job, as well as how to identify them and the damage they will do to your home.
[h=3]Woodrats (Pack Rats)[/h]Woodrats, or pack rats, are common in central Arizona. There are actually three species of woodrat in central Arizona: the whitethroat woodrat, Mexican woodrat, and Stephen’s woodrat. They are relatively large, 6-8 inches long, and can be identified by their fur-covered tails and white underbelly and feet. They are nocturnal, and are attracted to bright and shiny objects.
Woodrat nests are distinctive and conspicuous, and are usually constructed out of sticks, cacti, and organic debris. They’re most common in desert plant communities among juniper, chaparral, and desert scrub. However, they will also build nests in attics, underneath houses, or in abandoned vehicles. Woodrat nests are often used by many generations, and some have been occupied for up to 1,000 years!
Woodrat nests can be hazardous to the health of humans and other animals because their communal living and storage areas are paved with layers of urine and feces. They have a varied diet, and often steal produce from gardeners, or eat the heads of flowers. They also like to gnaw on electrical wires, garden hoses, drip irrigation tubes, and AC or pool pump wiring.
[h=3]Roof Rats[/h]Roof rats are a non-native species that began showing up in Arizona in the early 2000’s. They’ve become successful in our area because of the warm climate and abundance of food. They thrive in old-growth citrus trees, mature landscaping, and near irrigation canals.
Roof rats are similar in appearance to woodrats and Norway rats, which can lead to misidentification. The most distinguishing characteristic of roof rats is their long tail, which is hairless, scaly, and longer than their entire head and body. Roof rats are 7-8 inches long, with blackish fur and lighter underbelly.
Roof rats, like woodrats, are nocturnal. They prefer to do most of their foraging in elevated areas both indoors and outdoors, and like to climb among trees, vines, rafters and wires. They often use utility lines to enter buildings.
Roof rats can contaminate and eat stored food, gnaw on wiring and tear up insulation to use as nesting material. They also carry diseases such as murine typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, rat-bite fever, and plague, which they can transfer to humans. They also eat the bark of trees, and can girdle and kill them. A good sign of roof rats in your home is dark smudging on surfaces from oil and dirt rubbing off their fur as they move around. Look for these smudges up high among the rafters of your home. Since they live overhead, you are less likely to see tracks, urine or droppings.
[h=3]Norway Rats[/h]Norway rats, like woodrats and roof rats, are nocturnal. They are incredible acrobats, and can climb up and down pipes, jump up to 3 feet vertically, and have been known to jump 8 feet horizontally.
They are one of the larger rat species here in Arizona, measuring 8 to 10 inches long. Their tails can be a good identifier: they are shorter than the length of their head and body, and are scaly and nearly hairless, with darker coloring above and lighter coloring below. They are brownish-gray in color, with a lighter underbelly.
These rats usually nest in underground burrows next to foundations or under debris piles. Norway rats eat only a few ounces per day, but contaminate much more food than they eat. They have excellent gnawing capabilities, and can chew through almost any material, including lead, cement, insulation, electrical wiring and pipes. This propensity can cause tremendous structural damage to a home.
[h=3]House Mice[/h]House mice have been used to living with humans for thousands of years. This makes them a common pest in houses and outbuildings, as they depend on their human counterparts for shelter and food.
House mice can be distinguished from rats by their smaller size. While they are similar in appearance to juvenile rats, they have smaller heads and feet. They are usually ma dusty gray color, with a cream-colored underbelly.
Mice are mainly nocturnal, and they are inquisitive, social animals. They typically eat 1/10[SUP]th[/SUP] of an ounce of food per day, but they are capable of contaminating much more than they eat. One mouse can produce 50 droppings per day.
Adult mice can gain entry into a home through an opening .25 inches or larger. Once inside, they prefer to nest in dark, secluded places with ample nesting material – fabric, cotton, packing material or insulation. While they can damage your home in their search for nesting material, the main danger of having mice in the home is their ability to spread disease. House mice can transmit salmonella in their droppings, as well as tapeworms, rat-bite fever, infectious jaundice, plague, Hantavirus, and possibly poliomyelitis (polio).
 

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The fall when the cold weather comes on is when most mice try to find a warmer place to live. Remove any nearby food sources and if you can stop trying to trap them in your car as that is a food source! trap and poison them outside your car. i live in town but poison all low shrubs near where I park every fall.

In the past my issue was never mice, **** squarells putting walnuts and other food they collect under my hood. Might not seem so bad until TWICE(two different cars) they managed to wedge a green walnut under the throttle and the throttle got stuck wide open when driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So far I have not seen any dead mice or any droppings since the second dead one.

The pressure flaps appeared to be a straight drop off. I think the mice would have to do some ninja warrior stuff to access those vents; however, I do plan on covering them with a mesh.

The only scent other than little bit of peanut butter would be a lavender carpet powder which I used when vacuuming; thought it would have a similar effect like the dryer sheets. There's no food and it's as cleaning as I could get it.

Thank you for your input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
go to the store an buy a box of bounce sheets {dryer sheets}mice can`t stand the smell. spread them around in the trunk.
I placed 10 pieces of dryer sheets in various places. In the console, under the dash, cluster, air bag, beneath the carpet and many other places. I even sprayed peppermint oil but was consistent on that part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
In Arizona you must be kidding? Usually a mouse is smaller and has a shorter tail but these are the ones that eat cars and Planes
--------------------------
One of the things we love most about living in Arizona is the fact that we live next door to lots of beautiful and unique local wildlife. Arizona’s desert environment is home to an amazing array of biodiversity among mammals, arthropods, reptiles, birds and more.
Deer, bighorn sheep, jackrabbits, and foxes are just some of the animals that call Arizona home. However, there are some less friendly four-legged neighbors that can quickly become a pest problem for Arizona homeowners.
Animals are considered pests when they start to compete with their human hosts, or pose a danger to humans or other animals. While most wild animals tend to stay well away from human interaction and thrive without human interaction, some pest become accustomed to humans and can even become dependent on them – and that’s where the problems start.
In this blog post, we will outline some of the most common rats and mice that we encounter on the job, as well as how to identify them and the damage they will do to your home.
Woodrats (Pack Rats)

Woodrats, or pack rats, are common in central Arizona. There are actually three species of woodrat in central Arizona: the whitethroat woodrat, Mexican woodrat, and Stephen’s woodrat. They are relatively large, 6-8 inches long, and can be identified by their fur-covered tails and white underbelly and feet. They are nocturnal, and are attracted to bright and shiny objects.
Woodrat nests are distinctive and conspicuous, and are usually constructed out of sticks, cacti, and organic debris. They’re most common in desert plant communities among juniper, chaparral, and desert scrub. However, they will also build nests in attics, underneath houses, or in abandoned vehicles. Woodrat nests are often used by many generations, and some have been occupied for up to 1,000 years!
Woodrat nests can be hazardous to the health of humans and other animals because their communal living and storage areas are paved with layers of urine and feces. They have a varied diet, and often steal produce from gardeners, or eat the heads of flowers. They also like to gnaw on electrical wires, garden hoses, drip irrigation tubes, and AC or pool pump wiring.
Roof Rats

Roof rats are a non-native species that began showing up in Arizona in the early 2000’s. They’ve become successful in our area because of the warm climate and abundance of food. They thrive in old-growth citrus trees, mature landscaping, and near irrigation canals.
Roof rats are similar in appearance to woodrats and Norway rats, which can lead to misidentification. The most distinguishing characteristic of roof rats is their long tail, which is hairless, scaly, and longer than their entire head and body. Roof rats are 7-8 inches long, with blackish fur and lighter underbelly.
Roof rats, like woodrats, are nocturnal. They prefer to do most of their foraging in elevated areas both indoors and outdoors, and like to climb among trees, vines, rafters and wires. They often use utility lines to enter buildings.
Roof rats can contaminate and eat stored food, gnaw on wiring and tear up insulation to use as nesting material. They also carry diseases such as murine typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, rat-bite fever, and plague, which they can transfer to humans. They also eat the bark of trees, and can girdle and kill them. A good sign of roof rats in your home is dark smudging on surfaces from oil and dirt rubbing off their fur as they move around. Look for these smudges up high among the rafters of your home. Since they live overhead, you are less likely to see tracks, urine or droppings.
Norway Rats

Norway rats, like woodrats and roof rats, are nocturnal. They are incredible acrobats, and can climb up and down pipes, jump up to 3 feet vertically, and have been known to jump 8 feet horizontally.
They are one of the larger rat species here in Arizona, measuring 8 to 10 inches long. Their tails can be a good identifier: they are shorter than the length of their head and body, and are scaly and nearly hairless, with darker coloring above and lighter coloring below. They are brownish-gray in color, with a lighter underbelly.
These rats usually nest in underground burrows next to foundations or under debris piles. Norway rats eat only a few ounces per day, but contaminate much more food than they eat. They have excellent gnawing capabilities, and can chew through almost any material, including lead, cement, insulation, electrical wiring and pipes. This propensity can cause tremendous structural damage to a home.
House Mice

House mice have been used to living with humans for thousands of years. This makes them a common pest in houses and outbuildings, as they depend on their human counterparts for shelter and food.
House mice can be distinguished from rats by their smaller size. While they are similar in appearance to juvenile rats, they have smaller heads and feet. They are usually ma dusty gray color, with a cream-colored underbelly.
Mice are mainly nocturnal, and they are inquisitive, social animals. They typically eat 1/10[SUP]th[/SUP] of an ounce of food per day, but they are capable of contaminating much more than they eat. One mouse can produce 50 droppings per day.
Adult mice can gain entry into a home through an opening .25 inches or larger. Once inside, they prefer to nest in dark, secluded places with ample nesting material – fabric, cotton, packing material or insulation. While they can damage your home in their search for nesting material, the main danger of having mice in the home is their ability to spread disease. House mice can transmit salmonella in their droppings, as well as tapeworms, rat-bite fever, infectious jaundice, plague, Hantavirus, and possibly poliomyelitis (polio).

I am certain they are either Deer Mice or White Footed Mice. The three mice I caught looked Identical, well by memory at least. Also I compared the first one to Google Images of the Deer and White-Footed Mice and they like very very similar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The fall when the cold weather comes on is when most mice try to find a warmer place to live. Remove any nearby food sources and if you can stop trying to trap them in your car as that is a food source! trap and poison them outside your car. i live in town but poison all low shrubs near where I park every fall.

In the past my issue was never mice, **** squarells putting walnuts and other food they collect under my hood. Might not seem so bad until TWICE(two different cars) they managed to wedge a green walnut under the throttle and the throttle got stuck wide open when driving.
Haha. I like how you put that "Remove any nearby food sources and if you can stop trying to trap them in your car as that is a food source!" I figured they were already going in for some other reason and once in, how could I lure them to their death? I feared, without bait they'd just nest and move in.

Perhaps I could use cotton or card board to trigger the trap.

Man, that is a crazy squirrel story!
 

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I'm new here and this is my first post.

May 2015, saw a mouse above the windshield wiper and didn't think much of it. The next day I found a turd in my cup holder and noticed the issue from there on. Droppings were everywhere; from floor mats, back seat to the trunk. I work at night and I guess I just never noticed it. I hardly ate in my car and wasn't that messy.

The following day I saw that mouse under the hood. I tried to chase it out, but it hid well. I later caught it with a Victor snap trap and cleaned out the car the best I could. I found and moved torn tissue under my subwoofer and just trashed my trunk liner because I was disgusted and did want to deal with it. I honestly thought that was the last of it...

Since May, I've done the best to keep my car vacuumed and clean but kept finding droppings. It became frustrating and some what depressing, because all I could think of was dying of hantavirus.

Finally I decided to remove the carpet and find out where it might be coming in from. I found droppings everywhere under the carpet. They chewed through the foam and were able to go from the front to the back easily. So after removing the carpet, I washed the carpet with detergent and cleaned the bare floor. After, I used expanding pest foam and sealed all possible entries within the cabin and there were so many holes.

I found what might have been to possible entry; manual shifter cable grommet through the firewall. I foamed the **** out of it. So after that I left the car bare; no carpet, seats, stereo and console for a few days with traps, poison and bait set inside. No sign of activity for a few days with all the bait and poison untouched.

So I figure I resolved my issue. Today, I have a bare metal trunk, no passenger and back seats. I check almost every chance I get and just a couple of days ago I found a dead mouse caught in a Tom Cat trap which I duct-taped inside the trunk. Removed it completely and set another trap. 2 days later I caught another. The traps have a little bit of peanut butter on them.

The thing is... the trap was in my car for over a month with no signs of mice and just recently I caught the two. Does anyone have any suggestions on where I can find a 3D model of the chassis or something that can help me find entry points? I left the trunk vents untouched because it looks like a straight drop off and I can't image a mouse using suction cups and climbing up the steep walls.

HVAC is good, because my cabin air filter isn't damaged. I'm just wanting to stick a 2x4 on the throttle, and say good bye and watch it drive off a cliff. The really sad part is I still owe thousands on it. It isn't worth trading it in either, also I would hate to pass on this issue to the next


I had a major mouse issue with my 2014 Diesel Cruze a few years ago. They were getting in the car through the cabin air intake under the windshield cowling on the passenger side. Made nests in my cabin air filter. Got through the filter and into the cabin. Had one run across my shoulders while I was driving 75 mph on the freeway! Finally found that entry point and sealed it off with aluminum screening secured with aluminum tape. No problems since!
 

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