Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had some Cruze issues that just don't seem right and I wanted to see if anyone else had similar issues.

My better half and I both leased brand new 2017 Cruze base models starting back in November. Both are set up as high mileage leases and both cars are driven quite a bit. On one, most of the mileage is city driving and on the other the mix is closer to 50/50 city and highway driving. Generally, different gas stations are used. Both cars have been maintained by quick lube places, but at different locations, different times, etc.

Right around 28k on each of the cars, a bad misfire developed. It got worse very quickly and in both cases, the dealer diagnosed the issue as piston failure. Different dealerships in different states worked with each car. In both cases, the dealer attempted to replace one piston and in both cases, there was further internal damage and the engines needed to be replaced. Car #1 had the work done and runs fine now. Car #2 is in the shop now and hopefully will be finished by the end of the week. Both are being covered under warranty, but both cars are used for work and without our cars, we cannot work. Between the two of us, this has cost about $3,500-$4,000 in lost income. Needless to say, I am very disappointed. We invested in new cars to be used as a tool. I don't expect engine failures after less than 30k. I am very nervous that we will be dancing this dance again at 60k,90k, etc. when the cars are out of warranty. We both really like our Cruzes, but this could be a big problem.

Has anyone else had piston issues on a Gen 2 Cruze?

I am also a writer and journalist, so I reached out to GM's public relations department to inquire about possible issues. They have not commented.

I also have not been able to find out for sure which cylinder had the piston failure. Both dealerships haven't been able to give me much information and the service writers seem very detached from the actual technicians.

Any thoughts or experience would be appreciated.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I should clarify, In both cases, we were given loaner cars but because of insurance requirements, we could not use the loaner cars to work. So we weren't walking but weren't working either. In her case, the dealer was fine with arranging a car through Enterprise. In my case, we really had to fight for it. The dealer where I bought the car wasn't interested in helping out because it was on the Tuesday before Memorial Day. They told me that it would be a busy holiday weekend and basically to try driving it until afterwards. Yes, that gave dealerships a bad name since we recently bought two new cars there. GM had to get involved and helped me arrange service with another dealership where a loaner was available.

Unless we were misled, the oil changes were all done requesting Dexos spec oil at a national chain of quick lube stores - different locations. I don't really have a high opinion of those places, but it seems unlikely that lightning would strike twice by having them both put in the wrong spec oil and having it be an issue.

87 octane is always used. We just use a lot of gas and premium isn't budgeted for it. The turbo heat does make sense. I hate the added expense of using premium or midgrade fuel, but maybe that would keep this from happening again. Asking 100 cubic inches and a turbo to work that hard does seem a lot to me. But I also think in old school ways.

I will have to check the build dates. If I remember, the VINs aren't really close, but they were both bought in November.

Thank you for all of the input so far.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not sure about other states, main problem around here with ethanol is getting a good mix, start off with 80 octane and attempt to boost that to 87 with E10. Also ethanol is heavier than gas and will settle to the bottom of the tank where the input to the fuel pump is.

Read nothing about lifting your car and shaking it first to mix it up. Cruze only got top tier 91 octane fuel, yes, it more expensive, but with improved performance and economy and saving your engine, far cheaper in the long run.

Detonation is the key problem, on the compression stroke, piston is going up, creates heat that ignites low octane fuel. Crank inertia moves that piston up, detonation makes the piston go down, result, piston breaks.

Quick lube? Are they putting dexos in these things? Four bucks more for dexos for a five quart bottle than conventional oil, yet my dealers around here want 40 bucks more! Heck with you, will change it myself. Conventional can't take the heat, congeals and blocks your turbo oil flow.

Jiffy Lube will do a Dexos oil change, but they charge extra for it. The way that our leases are structured, the oil changes using factory spec oil are included in the lease if a fleet provider such as Jiffy Lube, Valvoline, Firestone etc. is used. I believe the fleet provider gets billed $96 for a Jiffy Lube Dexos oil change and tire rotation.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Neither of our cars have been tuned. Both are bone stock.

If General Motors built these engines to only survive on 89 or 93 octane, I would think that they should have recommended that. We were cross shopping several different cars and a premium fuel requirement or a 30k service life for an engine would have been deal breakers.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top