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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

What do you think? Sounds a little "Defensive" but still pretty good, IMO. I think they should have added a "low greenhouse gas" statement.
 

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It's not bad. Touting the MPG is definitely a good approach. I think they were also going for showing quietness in the cabin. I like the VW ads better though.
 

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Yup, that's the first thing that comes to mind when I hear diesel. Big old trucks with puffs of smoke. Even though I know those days are gone.

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Yup, that's the first thing that comes to mind when I hear diesel. Big old trucks with puffs of smoke. Even though I know those days are gone.

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Since urea injection has become required for commercial fleets of trucks/buses, bus stops, cities, and highways sure smell a LOT better!

I remember DC and New York a few years ago were full of charter buses blowing out huge clouds of oily smoke.

And then there were the old 350 Chevy diesel school buses that poured out blue and black smoke any time they ran (and man were those things unreliable).


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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
This just shows GM is more worried about the whole perception that
Diesel = Black smoke
Basically tring to change the mind of what people think about diesel cars.
I'm guessing they did focus testing and found that people still think of diesels that way and so this is the route they went. I still think they should have added a statement about how low the greenhouse gas emissions are.

Since urea injection has become required for commercial fleets of trucks/buses, bus stops, cities, and highways sure smell a LOT better!

I remember DC and New York a few years ago were full of charter buses blowing out huge clouds of oily smoke.

And then there were the old 350 Chevy diesel school buses that poured out blue and black smoke any time they ran (and man were those things unreliable).
Yes I'm amazed at how much cleaner buses are now. They're also testing CNG buses (compressed natural gas) and hybrid diesel buses here. They're both boldly marked and the batteries/CNG tanks are on the roofs of the buses.

The Diesel hybrids also greatly reduce smoke by using batteries to help get the bus moving from a stop and regenerative breaking. There is no "roar" when the bus pulls away. The CNG buses have absolutely no visible exhaust and are very quiet, especially at idle.

Would love to see a diesel hybrid car.
 

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Yes I'm amazed at how much cleaner buses are now. They're also testing CNG buses (compressed natural gas) and hybrid diesel buses here. They're both boldly marked and the batteries/CNG tanks are on the roofs of the buses.

The Diesel hybrids also greatly reduce smoke by using batteries to help get the bus moving from a stop and regenerative breaking. There is no "roar" when the bus pulls away. The CNG buses have absolutely no visible exhaust and are very quiet, especially at idle.
We have both of those here as well. I've never rode on either - my commuter bus is one of the smaller routes to/from the subway, but I've seen them around.

Would love to see a diesel hybrid car.
This would make a lot of sense.
 
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