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Greetings, I’m a new (slightly used 2018 diesel Cruze manual hatch) owner. Everything is going great. Trying to figure out how to see accurate DPF soot levels with the Torque and GM Biscan app...
 

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I have the same car as you, even the color, but mine is an RS. Usually see 45+mpg on my highway commute. Now at 45K with no real issues, but its currently at the dealer getting a half shaft replaced. I need to get the Biscan App up and going so I'm here for info too.
 

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Mine is the RS as well. I can get the app to induce a normal regen but the area that indicates soot grams is blank.
 

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I have the same car as you, even the color, but mine is an RS. Usually see 45+mpg on my highway commute. Now at 45K with no real issues, but its currently at the dealer getting a half shaft replaced. I need to get the Biscan App up and going so I'm here for info too.
Good to hear but surprised a half shaft would need replaced that early
 

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Greetings, I’m a new (slightly used 2018 diesel Cruze manual hatch) owner. Everything is going great. Trying to figure out how to see accurate DPF soot levels with the Torque and GM Biscan app...
Welcome! I have 3 Gen 2's, and one is a manual, and all are DIESEL (and all sedans).
With the manual, watch out for a failed dual mass flywheel, and clutch hydraulics.. My flywheel failed at about 12k miles. I now have over 25k miles and all has been well since, the hydraulics were replaced with the flywheel, and some have had issues with hydraulics (all new part numbers according to servicing dealer).

I also had a bit of a saga, that is not for sure over, about the 7" Mylink system.

Otherwise it's a great car.

For the Torque Pro, and Bi Scan for GM... you'll need to load the PIDs that are needed for the Torque App to read the various parameters, and since there are not many specific to the 1.6L Diesel, you need to load the 2.8 Diesel PIDs to get the soot levels. Snipesy on this forum wrote the code for BiScan, and he's said the 2.8 and 1.6 share near identical PIDs, I also load the LUZ PIDs (2014-2015 Cruze Diesel) since I do have one car that uses them. It is also good to add the SAE list of PIDs as well since that will get you some additional parameters to monitor.

Next, how to know what you are able to read from the ECU.. best way I have found is to get the car running, connect the phone to OBD 2 adapter, and then go the page to add a gage, a list of available parameters will come up, if they are in green with a current value, those are able to be read and displayed. After you load the pre-defined list of PIDs, you should see many show up on that list, you will see GMX for the Biscan PIDs, and SAE for the SAE PIDs. Make sure you save your set up when you get there, as it can take some time to get it set up and format the display, and my phone occasionally forgets it for some reason and if I have it saved I can restore it pretty quick, found the option after doing it the hard way a few times.

When you get that set up, it's amazing all the data you can obtain.

One note, for some inexplicable reason, should you get a check engine light and go to read the codes, Torque Pro for some reason lists a current fault as "historical" and a historical fault as "current" it is odd, but I just know that and adjust accordingly.
 

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Welcome! I have 3 Gen 2's, and one is a manual, and all are DIESEL (and all sedans).
With the manual, watch out for a failed dual mass flywheel, and clutch hydraulics.. My flywheel failed at about 12k miles. I now have over 25k miles and all has been well since, the hydraulics were replaced with the flywheel, and some have had issues with hydraulics (all new part numbers according to servicing dealer).

I also had a bit of a saga, that is not for sure over, about the 7" Mylink system.

Otherwise it's a great car.

For the Torque Pro, and Bi Scan for GM... you'll need to load the PIDs that are needed for the Torque App to read the various parameters, and since there are not many specific to the 1.6L Diesel, you need to load the 2.8 Diesel PIDs to get the soot levels. Snipesy on this forum wrote the code for BiScan, and he's said the 2.8 and 1.6 share near identical PIDs, I also load the LUZ PIDs (2014-2015 Cruze Diesel) since I do have one car that uses them. It is also good to add the SAE list of PIDs as well since that will get you some additional parameters to monitor.

Next, how to know what you are able to read from the ECU.. best way I have found is to get the car running, connect the phone to OBD 2 adapter, and then go the page to add a gage, a list of available parameters will come up, if they are in green with a current value, those are able to be read and displayed. After you load the pre-defined list of PIDs, you should see many show up on that list, you will see GMX for the Biscan PIDs, and SAE for the SAE PIDs. Make sure you save your set up when you get there, as it can take some time to get it set up and format the display, and my phone occasionally forgets it for some reason and if I have it saved I can restore it pretty quick, found the option after doing it the hard way a few times.

When you get that set up, it's amazing all the data you can obtain.

One note, for some inexplicable reason, should you get a check engine light and go to read the codes, Torque Pro for some reason lists a current fault as "historical" and a historical fault as "current" it is odd, but I just know that and adjust accordingly.
Thanks for all of the info! I tried it tonight and the DPF is reading 57 grams, down from 60 during 20 minutes of passive highway driving. So I am wondering if the scale of numbers are off with it being a PID for the 2.8 liter Colorado. It’s around 150 miles since I manually initiated a regen.
 

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Thanks for all of the info! I tried it tonight and the DPF is reading 57 grams, down from 60 during 20 minutes of passive highway driving. So I am wondering if the scale of numbers are off with it being a PID for the 2.8 liter Colorado. It’s around 150 miles since I manually initiated a regen.
Your 57 (I believe it's percent) is really typical for 150 miles. It shoots up pretty fast to about 40 then slows down, it's not linear in any way. I can have 40 miles and 40 percent, then the soot slows down, and as you have seen will do some passive regen in the mid-range to upper range up to about 90 or so, beyond 90 it goes up slow, then regen at 100. There should not be any problem due to the PID being from the 2.8, according to Snipesy, it's a near identical set of programming and PIDs, which I think is why he didn't bother to replicate that in a separate set of 1.6PIDs.

I also set my gage for soot to flash at about 97 percent, that way it catches my eye, and if I'm able to do a manual regen at that amount before I reach home, I'll do it, so it can be finished. I try to avoid interruption of regens whenever possible, but it won't hurt if on occasion it is interrupted. I also like it to cool down before park, something about 1250 degrees of DPF and SCR sitting with no airflow seems disturbing to me, but the car will keep the engine fan on in that case until it cools down.
 

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Your 57 (I believe it's percent) is really typical for 150 miles. It shoots up pretty fast to about 40 then slows down, it's not linear in any way. I can have 40 miles and 40 percent, then the soot slows down, and as you have seen will do some passive regen in the mid-range to upper range up to about 90 or so, beyond 90 it goes up slow, then regen at 100. There should not be any problem due to the PID being from the 2.8, according to Snipesy, it's a near identical set of programming and PIDs, which I think is why he didn't bother to replicate that in a separate set of 1.6PIDs.

I also set my gage for soot to flash at about 97 percent, that way it catches my eye, and if I'm able to do a manual regen at that amount before I reach home, I'll do it, so it can be finished. I try to avoid interruption of regens whenever possible, but it won't hurt if on occasion it is interrupted. I also like it to cool down before park, something about 1250 degrees of DPF and SCR sitting with no airflow seems disturbing to me, but the car will keep the engine fan on in that case until it cools down.
Thanks for the info, yeah maybe it’s mislabeled as grams instead of percentage with that 2.8 liter PID. I also let it idle for a few moments before I shut the engine off. The turbo is supposedly intercooled but I know from an aviation engine standpoint that shock cooling of turbos is hard on them.
 
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