Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New generation TDI's with Common Rail/DPF/SCR and those with Automatic transmissions

How To Break In The Cruze (CRTDI) Common Rail Direct Injection

Usage of cruise is "verbotten" when breaking ANY machine .

Rules that apply for the life of the car
-When the engine is cold (below the first 3 white marks at the base of the temp gage) rev the engine to at least 2,500 rpms.
-When the engine is warmed up (above the first three white marks) Rev the engine to no less than 3,000 rpms.
The reason for this is to keep the turbo on boost, clear the VNT guide vanes and apply firm pressure to the rings for optimal sealing against blow-by gasses. The rings need the boost to seal since its a turbo charged engine, babying the engine is detrimental and will lead to issues with compression if done so for very long.
-Keep rpms as close to 2000 rpm as possible when driving at a steady speed. This promotes optimum temperatures for the DPF and keeps the engine in the middle of its most efficient rpm range (1800-2200 rpm).
-Allow the automatic transmission to determine the optimal gear and engine rpm. It knows better than you... Provided you have it trained to be biased to the sport mode the engines shift points will occur at the ideal ranges.


Redline is defined as the maximum rpm allowed by the engine, in the case of all TDI's it is 5,100 rpm. The maximum physical limit of a TDI engine due in part to it's short stroke is approximately 8,800 rpm (this is when you will throw a rod or damage a piston, this rpm is not possible unless you force a downshift into 1st gear while driving 80mph)

The instrument cluster shows a red BAND starting at or around 4600 rpm, most owners will find that very little power resides beyond this point due mostly to the ECU reducing fueling to respect the smoke map.

Adaptive Transmissions , "adapt" based on how you apply the power with your foot. Over time they will modify shift patterns with a bias to a "Sport" mode. Train the transmission to shift as close to the recommended rpm ranges below.

When your engine was first produced the motor was placed in a test cell and "Run-in" by a computer run dyno. The motor after the run-in was DRAINED OF ALL ITS FLUIDS (Oil, Coolant etc), the filters were replaced and a unique break-in oil was installed to promote a proper break-in once installed in the car as well as to protect the engine from corrosion during shipping to final assembly.

The "Break-in oil", YES VW does use a specially formulated "Break-In" oil formulated under an internal "TL" specification and produced by Fuchs. The oil is a group IV synthetic 5w30 formulated to comply with the LowSAPS VW507.00 requirements as well as the TL specifications for break-in. The oil is intended to allow a controlled rate of wear while protecting the engine and allowing the internal parts to seat proplerly during the engines first 10,000 road miles.

First 1,000 miles
Keep rpms below 3,800. Avoid steady rpms. Frequent firm (75%) application of power is strongly recomended up to a maximum engine rpm of 3,800. Avoid the use of cruise control so that you naturally fluctuate the power with your foot.
DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

1,000-5,000 miles
Use the full 5,100 rpm power range. THIS DOES NOT MEAN DRIVE AROUND AT 5100 RPM! This DOES mean to find the rpm range where your cars best power resides. Most owners will find that the best engine operating range to be between 2000rpm and 4200 rpm for the purpose of acceleration. At all costs avoid using full throttle below 2000 rpm the ECU will attempt to prevent you from applying full power in this range, work with it and don't request it with your foot.
Continue to avoid steady rpms and avoid the use of cruise control. occasional application of full throttle (100%) is recomended to help seat the rings. City driving is ideal for breaking in a TDI due to frequent stops and acceleration. DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

5,000-10,000 miles
(Use of the cruise control is ok) at this point since most of the initial break in has occured. Continue to use occasional full throttle accelerations to continue to seat the rings. You will notice the engine become slightly louder during this phase due to less friction from the engine breaking in (normal for a diesel to become louder under lighter loads). If your going on a long drive and you are using the cruise, every so often step on the peddle to accelerate up about 20 mph then coast back down to your preset speed.

Your first oil change is due at 10,000 miles DO NOT change it early! Oil analysis supports 10,000 miles as being realistic for a first change interval. Wear metals will remain at safe levels during this entire first interval thanks to the initial run-in and flush at the factory before the engine was installed in your car.

10,000-60,000
This is when the rest of the break in occurs. The engine from the factory will check out with about 475psi of compression pressure out of the crate. It will take at least 60,000 miles to reach the peak pressure of 510 psi. For the most part once you get to 10,000 miles your compression will be around 490 psi meaning that most of the break in has occured.

60,000- and for the remaining life of the motor
The owners have followed the advice above and do not have any oil consumption issues. This also means that with the higher pressure the engine is more efficient returning optimal fuel economy and reduced smoke output. I am still of the opinion that if possible use a LowSAPS 5w40 instead of the 5w30 oils ie Mobil 1 ESP 5w40 formula M (MB229.51, .6 Sulfated Ash)


It takes Yes 60,000 miles to Full Break In a a TDI and This motor is no exception to the rule.


The only thing you need to do with the transmission is be firm with the pedal. The V10TDI is similar for break in but the transmission will determine the best shift points. Be firm with the gas pedal will bias the shift programming higher in the rpm range thus loading the motor a bit more.

I recommend NOT using the sport mode until you have at least 1,000 miles on the motor. This provides more load on the engine and helps out with the break-in. Once past 1,000 miles use the Sport mode freely.


"Run it hard from hour 0" is wrong - here's why

The "run it hard" opinion hit a resurgence with a website from an air cooled motorcycle mechanic. Aside from the page being focused on motorcycle engines, his hard break in technique for the street only takes the bike up to 65 mph - that's fast for a bike but not much for a car. Bikes are also thousands of pounds lighter than cars so the engine doesn't have to work very hard if you're driving "normally". Some of the misunderstanding is that one person's babying is another's beating. The advice also says that the critical window of opportunity is only 20 miles or 9 dyno runs, then it becomes 200 miles for the street - which is it? It also says that power loss from an easy break in could be up to 10% while the gain in power as a result of using his break in technique could be up 10%. Call me a skeptic: car makers have done full price + taxes buybacks when horsepower was 5% lower than advertised (RX-8) and it's well known that many engines are underrated in their actual power (335i N54).
The engine in your new car really isn't a brand new engine either - it was already tested at the factory, had its first oil change, driven on a dyno at the factory, on/off the transport, and then around the dealership. In some cases the car was driven to another dealer and test driven by other people. Some high performance cars are even driven hard on a track at the factory for quality control. If the first minutes of engine break in determine the rest of engine life and performance, you already missed it.
Engine break in goals are proper heat cycling, mating of parts, and stress reliving accomplished by incremental increases in varying rpm and load. You definitely don't want to baby the engine but you don't want to beat it hard either. The most important goals are avoiding excess engine wear, idling longer than you normally would, steady rpm, and high load on a cold engine. Let's look at the various parts of an engine and drivetrain to see how they are affected.
A component by component examination of engine break in

Clutch - Everyone will tell you that the clutch should be driven in moderate stop and go conditions for the first 500 miles with no excessive slipping. This transfers a layer of bedding material on the clutch, flywheel, and pressure plate, and prevents glazing from excessive heat and slipping. Holding a car on an incline using the clutch is really bad for the clutch and shouldn't be done even after break in. This wears the clutch disc for no reason and can contribute to excess heat and "hot spots". The outer diameter of a clutch and flywheel disc travels more distance in one rotation than the inner diameter (because it is farther from the center and travels in a larger circle), and the disc could, in extreme cases such as drag racing, promote warping and create an uneven friction surface. On a side note, aftermarket stronger clutch kits/pressure plates could result in more crankshaft thrust bearing wear. Check the above article for an explanation.
Turbo seals and bearings

The journal bearing turbos in your TDI float on a layer of pressurized oil. The turbo wheels can spin at speeds beyond 100,000 rpm and although it's spinning pretty fast at engine idle, it's still slower than if you're racing the engine. Early TDI are conventional fixed geometry and later/new TDI are variable vane turbos.
Engine crankshaft and main bearings, cylinder head

These are precision machined and/or polished parts and require no special break in other than stress relieving through heat cycling associated with the rest of a normal engine break in (varying rpm/load, etc.) Flat tappet lifters should be broken in by varying the engine rpm around 2000-2500 rpm for a half hour but this really applies only to brand new engines with flat tappet lifters. Your new car already had this done at the factory. This is one reason to avoid excessive idling.
Engine pistons and rings

This is the major source of controversy. First ask yourself how many correctly maintained and operated water cooled car engines (excluding engines with known build quality issues) are replaced because of cylinder glazing and oil consumption because of poor engine break in? All TDI and many modern engines also require synthetic oil. (Ever see oil sludge in a VW/Audi? Not pretty!) If an oil sludge problem develops from not using synthetic oil is it an engine design/build problem, an engine break in problem, or an owner maintenance-oil change problem?
During combustion, the pressures in the engine cylinder spike as the fuel burns. The rings act as a labyrinth seal and seal the piston against the engine cylinder wall and scrape oil. In general, diesel engines see much higher pressures than gasoline engines. A diesel engine may see 2000 psi peak combustion pressure vs. 1000-1700 psi for a gasoline engine. Engine pistons are not perfect round cylinders when cold because they compensate and expand when warm. The pistons also need to heat relax during break in. Before the engine is warmed up or broken in, the pressures of combustion can push past the piston rings more than a fully broken in and warmed up engine. This reduces engine efficiency, power, and fuel mileage but will improve as the engine is broken in and seals better. All engines benefit from a normal warm up during normal operation.
From minute 0, the rings and freshly honed cylinder walls will scrape against each other and begin break in by wearing into each other. Again, your brand new car's engine was already run in at the factory. The friction of the rings against the cylinder walls will also help heat cycle the rings. A good break in would have incremental increases in heat cycling, load, and rpm. The reason why you want to avoid moderate and high load/rpm operation at minute 0 on a cold engine is because this sudden increase generates excessive blow by and oil glazing. It's normal for a light coat of oil to be present on the cylinder walls, even more so during engine break in. But excess heat generated by high rpm/load can cause this oil to flash burn and glaze. Glazing can create generates hot spots where the rings are not yet seated evenly. This glaze is very smooth and prevents proper ring and cylinder break in. Excessive idling and consistently "babying" the engine can create the same problem.
Remember the section above where I wrote "the truth is somewhere in the middle"? I believe that the best engine break in is a moderate break in - not hard but certainly not easy. This means pushing the engine hard enough to seat the rings but not running it too light or too hard and creating glazing. My suggestion is to follow the owner's manual written by the people who made your car.
In the end, remember that anecdotal evidence or small sample sizes do not make a break in method right or wrong. We would all like to believe that individuals hold some special power over their cars that will result in a perfect break in and the best car. The truth is that different cars of the same model will have some engine and powertrain variation, even if everything else is equal. Some cars are lemons from birth and some come off the assembly line in flawless condition. If you still believe in the "hard break in" method, read this MotorTrend article which gets the advice of multiple automotive engineers from Ford, Honda, and GM who discuss the hard engine break in. If you read the popular mythbusting engine break in site, some of the advice is for breaking in an engine on a dyno. On the street it says to run your bike up to only 65 mph. Even if you follow his advice I would bet many overdo it.
Car & Engine Performance - Technologue Editorial - Motor Trend Thumbnail below (click to enlarge)

[HR][/HR] New engine break in procedure (can really apply to any modern water cooled car engine)

Differences between this and other popular engine break in advice: my suggestions on engine rpm are not so strict because it really depends on the situation. It's hard to quantify power as an exact RPM and load since each situation is slightly different. Instead, I write estimated rpm and % power. Terms like baby the engine, race, and normal driving mean different things to different people so this article gives some rough suggestions. Use your judgment to apply them depending on the situation. Exact mileages for each break in step are also hard to quantify because 10 miles at redline, up a hill, in stop and go driving, is not the same as 10 miles of highway break in.
For example, if you're going downhill in 3rd gear at 40 mph, the engine has little load but higher rpm. This is a case of low % power. But going back up the same hill in 3rd gear at 40 mph, the engine will be at the same rpm but have higher load. Both these situations have different accelerator pedal positions since a different amount of power is requested by the driver. As a general rule during initial break in, medium rpm with medium load is better than low rpm with high load since this can lug the engine which is bad in general. Just remember that a little more or a little less during engine break in isn't as important as long term maintenance on the long term health of the engine. A little more or less during break in won't cause your engine to blow up.
On a brand new engine (rebuilt or replaced engine), let the idle stabilize to build oil pressure, etc.. You should also be checking coolant levels, adjusting idle, or checking other things on a new engine. Once the rebuilt engine checks are complete, drive it with normal load, about 50-60% power until the engine is warm.
On a new car (remember, the engine was run at the factory) and once the engine is warmed up, drive normally with up to 70% power (around 2500-3600 rpm on a VW TDI) during normal driving for the initial break in. You won't kill the engine if you deviate from this so if conditions warrant higher rpm to avoid high load/low rpm (like lugging the engine up a hill), go for it. Don't baby it but don't race it to redline either. As a rough guideline, when on a flat road, keep the rpm moving up and down around 2000-2200 rpm on your TDI. Avoid extended idling.
After you've put some miles on it and once the engine is warm, rev it at varying throttle up to about 75-80% with medium load while driving in stop and go conditions. You want to avoid low rpm/high load power settings (like lugging the engine) so don't be afraid to downshift. Avoid steady rpm driving (like highway) and excessive idling. The best thing you can do is to drive up to 75-80% power and then coast down in gear under engine braking (foot completely off the accelerator pedal) in smooth, gradual cycles. This heats up the engine and then lets it cool down. Remember, there are oil spray jets in your turbodiesel (and most turbocharged cars) that spray the underside of the engine pistons to cool them down. Driving with moderate load and then letting it coast down in gear will heat cycle the engine. This is much easier on a manual transmission car.
If it's a rebuilt engine, change the oil at your discretion. A rough suggestion is after 1-2 miles and again at 5-10 miles. If this is a new car from the dealer, follow the recommended service/oil change in your owner's manual. I do not suggest changing the engine oil at an earlier mileage than the factory suggestion. Most engines already had the first oil change at the factory. Remember, dealers are independently operated so I suggest following the factory's suggestion, not the dealer's suggestion. All new TDI use VW spec 507.00 engine oil so make sure the dealer uses only VW 507.00 for warranty purposes.
Repeat the above for the first 500 miles, gradually increasing the load/rpm cycles of the engine. Between about 500-1000 miles, drive more normally. A brief, smooth, rpm cycling to full power is fine after 1000 miles. Don't jam the accelerator pedal but don't be afraid to press it all the way down either. You still want to avoid the use of cruise control or steady rpm driving. If this is a rebuilt engine, change the oil at your discretion.
Once you exceed well over 1000 miles, you can drive normally after warm up. You even want to rev it to redline under moderate load a few times to finish relaxing and heat cycling the engine. This is not the "hard break in" method that encourages high load and high revving from hour 0 (brand new engine). Always let the engine warm up with low load driving before higher rpm operation. This is the difference between the "hard" break in and proper break in: varying the rpm between low and high rpm and load on a warm engine is not the same as the hard break in method of high load and rpm on a cold engine - NEVER do that, even after engine break in. Avoid the use of cruise control or steady rpm driving, although by this point it's not as critical as from hour 0.
Once you exceed 5000 miles, most of the initial break in has occurred. Any engine oil consumption should go down and fuel economy should slowly increase. You still want to vary the speed when you can, but it's not as critical as before.
Past 10,000 miles, most of the engine break in has occurred on a diesel but your compression, oil consumption, and fuel mileage may still improve slightly to 25,000-50,000 miles. Engine oil analysis shows that even gasoline engines are still slightly breaking in slightly at over 10,000 miles. From now on, avoid lugging the engine, try to regularly drive at moderate power, and occasionally rev the engine under sustained high load/rpm. This helps to clear soot in the exhaust out of the turbo by raising exhaust gas temperatures and burning the soot up and blowing it out, especially for cars with VNT turbos. Even with a gasoline car, going to occasional sustained high load/rpm will help burn up engine deposits.

Any engine works best at its normal operating temperature so from now on, drive under low-medium power until it's warmed up.
[HR][/HR] Final notes

Engine lifespan and condition is more about consistency, maintenance, and long term habits (and engine build/design quality which is out of your control) than a secret technique that will give you some competitive edge. Anecdotal evidence or small sample sizes do not make a break in method right or wrong. People like to believe in a story or that their car is special and in a way, it is special. Variations in engine build tolerances, overall build quality, if the guy on the assembly line wasn't paying attention, all make your car unique and produce variances in power, fuel economy, and engine compression. Every car and every engine that comes off the assembly line has some variance. If a secret engine break in technique gave extra power, why don't hand built Corvette Z06 engines or Ferrari engines get this treatment? Surely Ferrari can add it to the cost of a $250,000 (before dealer markup) car! Every Nissan GTR is broken in on a bench dynamo-meter for 44 minutes including up to red line. After the engine is in the car it's dyno tested again and then driven hard on a track by a factory test driver (where they also do brake and transmission testing) so any "hour 0" break in technique by the owner is moot. Does this mean a hard engine break in is factory recommended for that car or that it doesn't make a difference over the long term? If engine break in was the determining factor in car life, wouldn't that make well beaten used rental cars the best cars ever?

Even if you didn't follow the optimum engine break in techniques, consistent engine warm up and consistent maintenance contribute to a long engine life span. Letting a 3 year old child have a soda won't contribute to obesity but giving them 2 liters of soda every day for life will. In the end, almost all original owners of passenger cars get rid of the car before they need a new engine due to wear, so does it make a difference anyways?


Conventional oil must NOT be used in ANY A4 TDI under any circumstances. The temperatures of the top compression ring will coke the oil (220C well above ANY conventional oils threshold for heat) This will lead to jammed rings or deposits also leading to reduced compression or worse scoring of the cylinder bores.

A TDI does in fact take 60,000 miles to break in, how do I know? Simple I sampled about 30 TDI's over the course of 100,000 miles performing comrpression checks First with less than 500 mile on the odometer then at 5,000 and then every 10,000 miles there after until compression topped out at 550PSI. A random sampling of TDI's outside of this group also showed the same compression figures of 550PSI regardless of mileage when using 5w40 oils. (Note: 5w30 showed lower compression figures usually around 520 psi due to viscocsity differences thus decreasing sealing efficiency for the purpose of compression checks).

So yes it DOES take 60,000 miles to fully seat the rings in a TDI.

PS Synthetic is NOT a super lubricant. It still lubricates in the same fashion as conventional oil using the same exact principles. What Synthetic oil DOES NOT have in common with conventional is that it does not break down as rapidly when exposed to heat. Synthetic also requires much higher temps ove longer periods of time to cause thinnning. Synthetic also has different heat absorbtion characteristics that result in better heat transfer to remove heat from within the motor. Synthetic oils due to the more extreme uses such as those carrying the CI-4 rating contain very high levels of additives, some of these additives improve the protection afforded the engine when the oil is run for longer durations such as in the case with extended drain intervals.

Also It ain't gonna warm up till you GO! So GO GO GO!

Under Steady state driving on the highway with a VNT
Maintain the highest gear you can. Higher gears when on the highway keep the engine "Loaded" or on boost since the engine has to create a higher BMEP to sustatin speed. Higher engine pressures and lower rpms will prevent "Glazing" that can occur from sustained high rpm driving.

The suggestions have to do with how you shift a TDI. On the highway with the exception of 4th and 5th the Turbo is making very little boost at legal speeds. Steady speeds, level terrain (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan) don't really cause much of a load change due to hills, this is why I suggest making speed changes to load up the engine during break in. If you live in Denver Your engine is going to do very well here.

This Break in procedure is what just about everyone does whether they think about it or not. Try and maintain your speed within 3 mph on the highway using just your foot, you would have a hard time doing it for very long. This driver induced variation is what causes the turbo to occasionally spool up and spool down, loading and unloading the engine at a steady speed. If you had a boost gauge you would see what I mean. The cruise on the other hand CAN maintain within 1 mph due to its constant watch on speed and load. This reduces the cyclical boost fluctuations that occur from speed deviations meaning a more steady engine load and BETTER FUEL ECONOMY.

Next time your driving try and listen to the turbo and see if you can hear it when its making boost. That rushing sound tells you that the VNT is cycling and the engine is loading. When you climb a hill listen for that sound or when you pass a car. Getting the engine on boost is very easy to do and extremely beneficial to breaking the engine in.

-When the engine is cold (below the first 3 white marks at the base of the temp gage) rev the engine to at least 2,500 rpms.
-When the engine is warmed up (above the first three white marks) Rev the engine to no less than 3,000 rpms.
The reason for this is to keep the turbo on boost, clear the VNT guide vanes and apply firm pressure to the rings for optimal sealing against blow-by gasses. The rings need the boost to seal since its a turbo charged engine, babying the engine is detrimental and will lead to issues with compression if done so for very long.

Do yourself a favor and don't drive your car like that. A TDI with a VNT will jam the vanes and in time kill the compression due to the lack of boost pressure and jammed rings.

The guide vanes need to move throughout their entire range, driving your car in that fashion is not allowing them to cycle and allowing an accumulation of soot to build up preventing the vanes from moving.




TDI Piston from an A4 ALH that had used nothing but synthetic (Group IV to be specific) over the course of 60,000 miles, Despite the discoloration from the extreme heat of combustion the rings were still free in their grooves, had a conventional oil been used the top ring and lower rings would have been damaged.

Hence I have said Use a FULL Synthetic Group IV Oil!
As they say a picture says a Thousand Words.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Following the break-in after 10,000 miles wont change anything. Modifying how you shift will directly impact the life of the turbo and the cylinders.

Most people that baby the engine by shifting at 2,000 rpm probably would not even notice a jammed VNT since they never get on the power. This has led in at least one case that I am very familar with, an engine whose compression was so low that the engine would have needed to be replaced due to jammed rings from the lack of boost when driving. Once we freed up the VNT the owner by simply following the shifting recommendations I listed was able to get the compression to recover to 470 PSI in about 2 weeks. The compression in this case had dropped to 330 psi far below spec causing serious missing and hard starting issues.

A Turbo charged engine does not suffer ill effects from higher boost pressure like a "Non Turbo Engine WITH a turbo" installed would like the case may be with a 2.0 gasser with an aftermarket turbo upgrade. The rings are designed in such a way that the combustion gasses get behind the comression ring causing the ring to expand outward and down forcing the ring to seal the gasses and prevent them from getting between the cylinder and ring/piston. The shape of the interior diameter varies based on the combustion gas pressures created by the burning of fuel and air. If the ring is designed for a turbo charged or Super charged engine they reduce the surface area thus requiring higher cylinder pressures to create the required pressure on the ring to seal in the gasses. Running an engine that is designed for a turbo charger at low boost pressures or low loads means that gasses are not being sufficiently sealed from passing around the ring. When this occurs the carbon eventually builds around the ring jamming it in the groove and preventing it from expanding and contracting with the gas pressure fluctuations from each combustion event in the cylinder. This is the principle behind the shift recommendations that I tell everyone to follow.

In Practice, I have found that the 2,500 rpm range when cold allows the Glow Plugs to remain on helping to assist the engine reach operating temperature WITHOUT revving the engine too high with the cold oil. Once your engine is warm shifting at no less that 3,000 is sufficient to get the engine on boost and cycle the VNT guide vanes throughout their full range. Keep in mind that this engine if it was allowed by the ECU could safely reve to around 7,000 rpm with not ill effects. The TDI is not a long stroke diesel like in a 3,000 rpm redline CAT, instead the TDI uses a near identical stroke as a gasser and increases the compression by nearly eliminating the combustion chamber when compared to a gasoline engine. With a good synthetic like Delvac 1 5w40 rpms of 2,500 are simply a NON issue when the engine is cold in temps of -30F. In fact not getting the engine to operating temp quickly does more harm than good by keeping rpms excessively low (less than 2,000 rpm shifts not to mention the soot build up on the VNT).

As far as the Automatic transmission TDI's the Transmission ECU is already programmed with a "Warm Up" program to facilitate a faster warm up, The Chevy Cruze has this!, with increase rpm shift points, in other words its all taken care of so just drive it and forget about it. I doubt that you would ever see a jammed VNT on any automatic transmission provided that its not allowed to idle excessively.

I hope this helps and explains a few things. If any one has any question please send me a PM or post it here.


GAS mileage?
You're talking DIESEL, or FUEL mileage? (GAS mileage should be zero)


Be patient with the mileage. It only gets better over time. Given that the TDI takes so long to fully break-in, one of the consequences is that it takes some miles (about ~ 15-20k miles) to see the mileage improvements, so be patient.

I've found that my tendency to zip around doing spirited driving and highway cruising at 80+ MPH does cause the mileage to take a bit of a hit. The mileage hit is nowhere near as big as it would be if I were driving gasser, especially a turbo gasser. (I used to drive a 06 Pontiac GTO.):eek:mg:

I'm getting around 42-52 MPG with my bone stock Cruze and

I've found from my TDI experience over the past year that it really does take around 60k miles to fully break in.Performance Will get better with time and miles. Oil consumption is pretty much negligible. There are TDIclum members with well over 100k miles on their TDIs and their performance and mileage are STILL improving! (How many gassers can do that?)

Congratulations on the new ride and get out there and Drive! Caution: There is no known medical cure for "Cruze" addiction".



When I say use the full rpm range that means what ever you feel comfortable using. The idea is not to rev the engine and keep it revved, the idea is to LOAD the engine. When getting onto a highway revving the engine in 3rd and 4th "Load" the engine on the on ramp but this also means using a large portion of the rpm band perhaps even getting into the 4,000+ range. Listen for the turbo, when you hear it whooshing this means you are loading the engine or another way to put it is you are "On Boost". This is what seats the rings.

Rpms are also important in terms of getting the turbos' VGV's to cycle. As a rule the no lower than 2,500/3,000 shift rule is to allow the turbo's VGV's to cycle and clear the turbo preventing a jammed VNT.

Keep it simple and load the engine but don't baby it !!!!at 1,900 unless you want to buy a new turbo.

When I say use the full rpm range that means what ever you feel comfortable using. The idea is not to rev the engine and keep it revved, the idea is to LOAD the engine. When getting onto a highway revving the engine in 3rd and 4th "Load" the engine on the on ramp but this also means using a large portion of the rpm band perhaps even getting into the 4,000+ range. Listen for the turbo, when you hear it whooshing this means you are loading the engine or another way to put it is you are "On Boost". This is what seats the rings.

Rpms are also important in terms of getting the turbos' VGV's to cycle. As a rule the no lower than 2,500/3,000 shift rule is to allow the turbo's VGV's to cycle and clear the turbo preventing a jammed VNT.

Keep it simple and load the engine but don't baby it by shifting at 1,900 unless you want to buy a new turbo.


Also the correct ID to ours cars is Common Rail Turbo Direct Injection. (CRTDI) TD stands for Turbo Diesel.

when using a 5w40 synthetic oil the "Over revving" or "Over loading" when the engine is cold is virtually eliminated. The ECU knows what is going on and the transmission ECU as well monitors the engine systems so let it do it's thing. Keep in mind we are not talking about a 10L CAT diesel with a 2,600 rpm redline.

Your engine has oil injection, so splash lubrication is not a concern with cold oil. Oil will be injected under each piston and into each cylinder with a continuous spray of oil when the engine is hot or cold.

The other thing worth mentioning is that the auto does not have a coolant heater system. Shifting above 2,500 is a non issue because the coolant heaters are not there so they won't shut off. the higher revs also help to create heat in the tranny...Remember that the tranny is liquid cooled using the same coolant as the engine, in fact the circuit is hooked up so that the transmission replaces the coolant heater circuit, thus the transmission helps to heat the engine when cold. It goes back to just letting the transmission ECU do it's thing.


The fact that compression increases up to 60,000 miles dows play a part in the overall efficiency of the motor.

Leakage past the rings in a new engine which eventually become matched to their respective bores will increase the overall efficiency of the motor.

New compression is around 475 psi cranking where an engine with around 30,000 miles is around 525psi meaning that a majority of the break occurs in the first 30,000 or so miles. Notice that the highest increase in fuel economy occurs within this mileage range. From 30,000 to 60,000 miles the compression continues to increase to around 550 psi cranking pressure with perhaps a slight improvement in that time.

The reason for revving the engine to 2500 is to increase the flow of gasses BUT there are several other factors you are not taking into consideration.

The VE series TDI's as well as the PD engines DO NOT make peak injection pressure below 2,000 rpms! The means driving at the lower rpms decreases your injection pressure, thus reducing the quality of the injection event. Peak pressure occurs at or around 3,000 rpm.

Revving the rpms to 2500 when shifting also increases the hydraulic heating of the fuel system, meaning you get warmer fuel faster reducing emissions as well as increasing the quality of the fuel injection event. Warm fuel (to a point) is needed to get the right viscosity for proper fuel delivery control.

Revving to 2500 rpms also increases the flow of oil within the engine. This increases the flow of oil under the pistons, increases volume through the oil the water heat exchanger...In other words you are decreasing the time to get the engine up to operating temperature.

Shifting at 2500 rpms also increases the piston bore speed meaning that you have higher compression temperatures to aid in auto ignition of the fuel due to decreases in thermal loss although this can be argued that its the higher fuel pressure improving the fuel injection event.

2,000 rpms also places ALL TDI's right at the surge line in terms of compressor surge on the turbo. For those that are chipped or ninjectored 2,000 rpms is one area that you have no business driving within for any period of time much less shifting AT 2000 rpm meaning you are alwasy on the verge of compressor surge/stall...KABOOM there goes the turbo!

Again when the engine is cold, shift at 2500
When the engine is warm, 3,000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"Common-rail" engines.

You must use an engine oil that explicitly states that it conforms to VW 507.00. NOTHING ELSE. These engines are too new for anyone to have experimented long-term with substitutes ... and in this case, the effect on the emission control components has to be considered. The VW part number for what is normally used at the dealer is GVW-052-195-M2.

Due to the limited number of VW diesels in North America, these oils are typically available only at VW dealers and parts vendors that specialize in VW cars. Other parts vendors might be able to special order it, so ask. To forestall another question, this is NOT a "monopoly". Engine oil vendors outside of VW dealers are perfectly free to market oils that meet VW's standards. The fact that not many have chosen to do so is THEIR fault, not VW's.

Beware the "meets or exceeds" game. The oil has to be certified to these standards by VW themselves. Amsoil is one notable oil brand which does not pay for such certification. They produce an oil which states VW 505.01 on the bottle, but it is not on VW's list of certified oils. That doesn't mean it's a bad product ... it just means that if something bad happens, there is a possibility that VW isn't going to warranty it (on the grounds that you did not use one of VW's certified oils), and if that happens, you are going to have a battle on your hands. It is BEYOND THE SCOPE OF THIS THREAD to explore the fine points of VW 505.01 certification, the subject has been beaten to death elsewhere with no end in sight, this thread merely serves to make you aware of the situation. If you want to research this, search the forums - there is already a ton of discussion on this and I'm not going to tolerate any further discussion of it in this thread.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I USE SOMETHING ELSE?

If the oil is not meant for diesel engines, it won't survive the high-soot environment. Oil meant for diesel engines is formulated to deal with the soot.

If you use a non-synthetic oil, it doesn't withstand high temperatures as well as synthetic oil. There are two areas of concern, the turbocharger, and the upper piston rings. There have been cases reported where upper piston rings were sticking due to oil breakdown, causing high piston ring and cylinder wall wear. There have been cases where turbochargers coked up their oil feed line and grenaded as a result.

If you use an oil that doesn't meet VW 505.01 in a P-D, expect high camshaft and lifter wear in the long term. MOBIL 1 (Gasoline engine oil) IS NOT GOOD ENOUGH. (Some people have been reporting good oil-analysis results using Mobil 1 TDT even though it doesn't carry the VW approval.) These engines have unusually high contact pressures between the camshaft and lifters due to the narrow cam lobes forced by the space taken up by the P-D injector mechanism. It is NOT a safe assumption that an oil suitable for large truck engines which also have unit injectors will work in a VW P-D TDI.

If you use an oil that doesn't meet VW 507.00 in a common-rail engine, there is a risk that the additive package in the oil will be incompatible with the (very expensive) emission control system - and it's not only the emission control system at risk. These engines deliberately squirt an extra shot of fuel into the cylinder on the exhaust stroke to heat up the catalytic converter in order to "regenerate". A portion of this fuel will end up on the cylinder walls, be scraped up by the piston rings, and end up in the crankcase, where it will dilute the engine oil. The engine oil must be designed to tolerate a certain amount of fuel dilution on these engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,267 Posts
I feel enlightened on proper treatment of a cold, CR diesel. I've finally broke myself of the idling habit recently, but did try to baby under 2,500rpm while cold. I'll reconsider my approach and get after it a bit more :)

Now I realize VW uses a break in formula from the factory as you mentioned which is why you want to keep it in there for the first 10k. I did not know this until now which is why I thought you were nuts recommending this to us before. My question of why has been answered. Correct me if I'm wrong but our cruzes do NOT have any special break in formula in them. Just a cut rate shitty semi-synthetic oil. I was planning on doing an oil change today at 2k and then another at 7.5k (to get back on schedule and get all the old GM stuff out) but will hold off if there's a good reason for it such as with VW's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
690 Posts
Well I hope I'm still ok. I mainly drive interstate. I bought the car strictly for Fuel saving. I'm at 8000 miles now and have used the cruise set at around 1800 rpms since new. I guess you could say I've babied it. So am I at having future problem's for not going up and down the rpms as stated???? I have driven semis for the last 26 years and they are governed at 65 mph running at the same RPMs for many miles but last well into the million mile range. So why do they last so long when driven at a constant rpm range. I also know when your shifting a big rig it goes through a lot of different rpms so that could be the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good Day Gator,
A Semis is a Long stroke diesel and the Cuze is a Short Stroke Diesel big difference. Our cars once broke in have 2 speeds ,dead stop and wide open. As you read in the post its very important to follow the break in to get a good seating on the rings. Gator just go back and read and start doing the Break in as posted and you will be good to go. If you have any more question send me a pm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have not been able to confirm if this Break in oil from factory is like what VW does and yes even I have called Germany and I still get different answers as I my self want to know . If and when I find it , I will share it with every one.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,787 Posts
I have not been able to confirm if this Break in oil from factory is like what VW does and yes even I have called Germany and I still get different answers as I my self want to know . If and when I find it , I will share it with every one.
So given the above, can you clarify whether your oft repeated recommendation, that diesel owners keep the factory fill oil in their crankcases for 10,000 miles, still stands?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
At this point since I can't get a straight answer ,Me I am going to change the oil sooner then later , just to be on the safe side.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,652 Posts
It's funny, engine break in is an important topic for gearheads like us, but 99% of people who buy these cars will probably never have even heard the term "break in". I would be interested to see how these engines age with each of us on the forum here. I will probably be one of the first to hit 100K miles (probably about another year and a half if I keep up my current habits) and I plan on reporting my results on here at that time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
It's funny, engine break in is an important topic for gearheads like us, but 99% of people who buy these cars will probably never have even heard the term "break in". I would be interested to see how these engines age with each of us on the forum here. I will probably be one of the first to hit 100K miles (probably about another year and a half if I keep up my current habits) and I plan on reporting my results on here at that time.
Same here, when I get mine this spring, I plan on keeping it forever. With all the highway driving I do, it will pay for itself. Also, if I wanted to sell it a long ways down the road (which I won't), I could get a good price for it, because everyone would be going diesel for the fuel economy.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top