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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new here from CT, I just got a 2011 ECO 1.4T with the 6 speed auto.
it is a good running car and it has 141K miles on it.

It has a small oil leak from the bottom of the oil cooler which i am going to fix but am running into issues.
i have not ordered anything because there are some parts i cannot find probably cause i cannot think of the name of them.
there is a coolant pipe with an O ring that goes into the left side of the oil cooler, it is attached to whatever the thing is the bottom radiator hose connects to.
i want to get the hose that goes to that pipe and also the O ring. i do not have any pictures cause the pipe is behind the turbo.
i am going to be ordering the whole oil cooler which will be an AC Delco OEM part.
I can't even figure out how the bottom radiator hose comes off because it is not just a clamp like most other cars.
i am mechanically inclined just not cruze 1.4 inclined.

Here is something interesting on the 1.4 turbo i have never seen before. it measures the coolant temp in the radiator AND engine and if there is a greater than 30 degree difference it
throws a code for coolant flow low performance P00B7.
the code came up on my cruze and the dealer said it has a warped head and will cost $3,200 to repair, it has a new thermostat and water pump, there is no coolant loss or mixing and it does not over heat, smoke or misfire.
it runs smooth and shows no drive ability issues at all. they only had the car for a half an hour which i don't believe is enough time to be 100% sure about a warped head on a car that drives fine with no signs except that P00B7 code which by the way after about 500 miles still has not returned.
if you live where the winters can get very cold you could see this code with nothing wrong with the car. when the light came on the car was on the highway and the wind chill was 25 below 0, this would cause the coolant in the radiator to cool much much faster making the temp difference enough to throw the code.
does this make sense or am i looking at a warped head that shows no symptoms?
 

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The thermostat is controlled by ECM. The thermostat opens only between 220-230F, I did a lot of tests myself. No more thermostats that open at 205F! This is in order to improve engine performances (they say). So, you need to keep always the antifreeze concentration above 50% to make sure the boiling point (under the pressure) is not under 230F! However, for 30 degree (F or C?) difference, the reason could be the thermostat locked on closed position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The thermostat is controlled by ECM. The thermostat opens only between 220-230F, I did a lot of tests myself. No more thermostats that open at 205F! This is in order to improve engine performances (they say). So, you need to keep always the antifreeze concentration above 50% to make sure the boiling point (under the pressure) is not under 230F! However, for 30 degree (F or C?) difference, the reason could be the thermostat locked on closed position.
Thank you for the reply. If the thermostat had gotten stuck closed it would have shown a very high temp on the gauge and overheated the engine and that didn't happen. the thermostat has a spring and is controlled by temp not the ECM, it only has a temp sensor on the housing. you are right about the antifreeze, you can't run 50/50 because it operates at such a high temp.
 

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.. the thermostat has a spring and is controlled by temp not the ECM, it only has a temp sensor on the housing..
Until I opened and tested the thermostat, I thought that too. However, it is not like that. The thermostat itself starts opening at 105-106C(221-223F). This is mechanically only. Now, the ECM is connected to thethermostat via the marked plug in my picture and whenever it “decides” (based on other information that receives), it applies 12V and heat up the thermostat forcing it to open, regardless of the temperature of the water. During my tests, I applied 12V and opened the thermostat completely in about 12 seconds.
Forget about the gauge indicator! The dial changes with the temperature only until ~185F, then it stays there, as everything would be ok, no matter how high the coolant temperature goes. Use your OBD and check the real temperature data and you will confirm my test. Since I was curious, I change the coolant concentration to 40-60% and let the engine to heat up. Well, the coolant was boiling and my gauge still indicated that everything “was ok”!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The thermostat is controlled by ECM. The thermostat opens only between 220-230F, I did a lot of tests myself. No more thermostats that open at 205F! This is in order to improve engine performances (they say). So, you need to keep always the antifreeze concentration above 50% to make sure the boiling point (under the pressure) is not under 230F! However, for 30 degree (F or C?) difference, the reason could be the thermostat locked on closed position.
i am not up on all of the new technology, the code has never returned, it takes a while to get heat but it is good heat when it does come up. usually takes the car at least 10 min of driving time to get heat and that is with letting the gauge start to move before i take off.
right now the car has pure coolant with no distilled water added, i read that if you mix water it can boil and so far it has never boiled or come close.
coolant is close to needing to be changed, i plan on doing it when i replace the oil cooler, i only will run OEM no universal or generic.
 

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..right now the car has pure coolant with no distilled water added..
Oh no!:cry: The key for the cooling system is the water. You add antifreeze to prevent the freezing and increase the boiling point but if you go over 65-70% mixture then you go into the wrong direction! Ethylene glycol disrupts hydrogen bonding when dissolved in water. Pure ethylene glycol freezes at about −12 °C (10.4 °F), but when mixed with water, the mixture does not readily crystallize, and therefore the freezing point of the mixture is depressed. Specifically, a mixture of 60% ethylene glycol and 40% water freezes at −45 °C (−49 °F). To translate this, if you are running on pure antifreeze (glycol) then you have the freezing point at only 10.4F. Also the antifreeze has a lower specific heat transfer than water, so a pure antifreeze solution will act as a better insulator than water! If were you, I would change that as soon as possible…
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh no!:cry: The key for the cooling systm is the water. You add antifreeze to prevent the freezing and increase the boiling point but if you go over 65-70% mixture then you go into the wrong direction! Ethylene glycol disrupts hydrogen bonding when dissolved in water. Pure ethylene glycol freezes at about −12 °C (10.4 °F), but when mixed with water, the mixture does not readily crystallize, and therefore the freezing point of the mixture is depressed. Specifically, a mixture of 60% ethylene glycol and 40% water freezes at −45 °C (−49 °F). To translate this, if you are running on pure antifreeze (glycol) then you have the freezing point at only 10.4F. Also the antifreeze has a lower specific heat transfer than water, so a pure antifreeze solution will act as a better insulator than water! If were you, I would change that as soon as possible…
i'll go out and drain about 3/4 of a gallon and add distilled water, thanks for the info, the last think i need is a frozen block.
 
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