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...time to see "which way" the smoke blows.
 

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I saw that. I hope they find out what the root causes are. So far we've seen a bunch of fires, usually after dealer service.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems the 1.8's are catching fire. The article did say a 2011 Eco caught fire, but I'm wondering if that was a fluke or bad reporting.
 

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...not trying to count any chickens before they've been hatched, but the fuel-lines are highly pressurized from the tank to the engine...so, anything along the way could be problematic.
 

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I like how the article cites a guy saying that poor maintenance, improper use, and aftermarket modifications can lead to fires. These vehicles aren't old enough yet for improper maintenance. I doubt anyone is offroading a Cruze and auto-x might burn up the brakes and wreck the suspension but certainly not cause fires. As far as aftermarket mods, unless you're messing with the fuel system, an air intake or exhaust modifications aren't going to cause fires. I haven't seen anyone talking about replacing fuel system components yet either.
 

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Reporting is kinda iffy in this article...

"Chrysler Group spokesman Nick Cappa says the company is aware of the incidents but knows of no accidents or injuries related to the issue. Chrysler is cooperating with the investigation. The company sold 131,000 Cruzes from the 2010 model year."
 

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Reporting is kinda iffy in this article...

"Chrysler Group spokesman Nick Cappa says the company is aware of the incidents but knows of no accidents or injuries related to the issue. Chrysler is cooperating with the investigation. The company sold 131,000 Cruzes from the 2010 model year."
I went to point this out, had it half typed and said screw it haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)

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Well, I did ask for more information about Cruze fires in Crispy's thread. Guess its starting to come.
 

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Looks like they edited the article, it's corrected now to say Wranglers.
 

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"These vehicles aren't old enough yet for improper maintenance."

It just takes one oil change not done correctly to cause a fire. And if you think about it, an all-new car has a higher rate of being maintained incorrectly due to lack of knowledge. The guys at [fill in the blank] lube store are learning how to change oil on these cars without much mfg info.

Also, from what I have read in this forum over the past year, Cruze owners like to mod.
 

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So any new update on this, I read the NHTSA report, and I hope this gets figured out soon.

Sent from my HTC Rezound using AutoGuide.com App
 

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How many people check their dipstick after paying for a professional oil change? Then start their engine with the hood still up and see if any oil is leaking out?
Serious question: how many people know what an oil dipstick looks like?
 

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"These vehicles aren't old enough yet for improper maintenance."

It just takes one oil change not done correctly to cause a fire. And if you think about it, an all-new car has a higher rate of being maintained incorrectly due to lack of knowledge. The guys at [fill in the blank] lube store are learning how to change oil on these cars without much mfg info.

Also, from what I have read in this forum over the past year, Cruze owners like to mod.
It isn't rocket science to change the oil, normally what happens is the person changing it rushes and forgets the dipstick or oil fill cap, but lack of knowledge is not likely the cause, and honestly an oil fire is not a likely suspect unless it is leaking right onto the turbo, flash point of oil is pretty high. Could be leaking onto the turbo though, which could certainly light it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So any new update on this, I read the NHTSA report, and I hope this gets figured out soon.

Sent from my HTC Rezound using AutoGuide.com App
Patience, Grasshopper. It will take a couple of weeks at least to hear what transpires from the investigation. I just hope that the folks here who have posted that they had a fire in their Cruze go to the NHTSA site and file a complaint. The more information they have, the better the analysis will be.
 
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As far as I have seen here, all the Cruze fires started shortly after an oil change. This would indicate the problem may not be with the car itself but the oil change procedures being used.
 

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Well, I did ask for more information about Cruze fires in Crispy's thread. Guess its starting to come.
Hi GoldenCruze, thanks for leaving me the info. I'm from Canada so I had to speak to the Canadian Transportation Agency. They are starting an investigation as well. I will hopefully hear more soon.
 

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Certainly a long term heated argument about using HC's as a refrigerant was going on, namely using butane/propane as a refrigerant. Inexpensive, biodegradable, and effective as an efficient refrigerant. Is a gas, doesn't accumulate like any liquid, and the volume is in the one and a half pint range when condensed.

EPA quickly took care of that argument, by banning the use of HC's with heavy fines, for automotive applications not for environmental reasons, but for safety reasons.

For the same type of vehicles carry say 27 gallons of highly combustible liquid that spread on the ground like crazy, like gasoline. And three to five gallons of also a highly combustible automatic transmission fluid and power steering and brake fluid.

Nothing more secure than driving down the highway with a full tank of gasoline, that is until you get involved in an accident or your in-tank fuel pump goes out, really no easy way to drain a full fuel tank to change that pump. Will omit the discussion of spreading diesel, aviation, or gasoline liquids, as it is very gruesome. Not only for the occupants, but for people in a hundred to two hundred foot radius from the cause.

Three components are necessary for a fire, fuel, oxygen, and ignition temperature, atmosphere is 20% oxygen, fuel source is from the oil companies, and plenty of ignition temperature creating devices are in the vehicle. One such device required by law is the catalytic converter. Here the key component is that automatic transmission fluid directly ahead of it. Only take one little seal to go bad.

Further enhanced by three, not one, but three plastic fuel lines nearby. Three are now required, first to permit fuel recirculation for that very cheap overheated fuel pump, fuel is used as the coolant. God, I hate these over priced poorly made brush motors that consume as much as 140 watts of electricity. Their key safety factor is immersed in gasoline, no oxygen is present. That accounts for one additional fuel line, the third if for evaporative emission control, mostly fumes, but nevertheless, a highly combustible fuel. Three fuel lines are three times more hazardous than using one, but yet is the law. And plastic is far cheaper than stainless steel for fuel lines. Have to think about the stockholders on this issue.

Was on the committee fighting for hydrogen fuel, a lost battle with our oil controlled congress, hydrogen is nothing more than gasoline with the carbon removed. Guess what, finally talking about global warming from its burnt component, CO2. Can be produced from nuclear, hydro, or wind power plants, and even the technology exists for economically removing it from fossil fuels. if ignited burns straight up, does not spread like the other fluids we have in our vehicles. And burns very cleanly with the only exhaust output of drinkable water. But totally shot down by our oil controlled congress.

Vehicles would be far cheaper to produce as none of that carbon reducing and after burning emission high temperature fuel wasting catalytic converter would have to be used. Their major argument against hydrogen was the Hindenburg using hydrogen. Was worthless discussing the fact that this hydrogen was not used as a fuel stored in high pressure safety tanks, but installed in all things as gas bags made from the intestine of animals. And the fact that people survived that tragedy whereas in similar air so-called accidents, literally thousands have died a very painful death, and all of them.

Also find it ironic the emphasis on safety is to lock us up in our vehicles rather than giving us a quick way to get out.

Its going to take a long time NSTHA is come out with a report, scratching their heads how to blame this on something else, BS is the word. Get the same thing from the EPA on this refrigerant issue. Really don't feel they are working for us, but for other interest. Why do I feel that way? Because they are!
 
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