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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The dealer only had the standard 94r battery not the AGM battery. Any one been using a standard lead acid battery in their diesel Cruze
 

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I had my original battery replaced with GM part number 88864065, which I believe is a standard battery. It has performed flawlessly so far. I've had it over a year.
 

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I had my original battery replaced with GM part number 88864065, which I believe is a standard battery. It has performed flawlessly so far. I've had it over a year.
I guess its all in how we define "performed flawlessly" and for which type of battery the charging regulator was originally design for?

Theoretically flooded and AGM cells have different charging curves and the chargers are normally design to match the battery technology for optimal battery performance. Kind of like what the meaning of "it" is ?? :huh:
 
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I guess its all in how we define "performed flawlessly" and for which type of battery the charging regulator was originally design for?

Theoretically flooded and AGM cells have different charging curves and the chargers are normally design to match the battery technology for optimal battery performance. Kind of like what the meaning of "it" is ?? :huh:
Interesting. I never really gave it much thought before. My logic consisted of "battery's done - go to GM dealer to get a new one". I think the battery I got is a Cadillac/Buick battery.

"Flawlessly" to me means that it always cranks right up on a cold start, and there have been no electronic anomalies.
 

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My 1st AGM battery died in 1 year. Had a free replacement... so I have another AGM battery... so far not impressed :) but I may have just had a dud
 

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Buy a better battery. Buying the same POS that died in the first place is doing the same thing and expecting different results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's under warranty so, the battery is no cost. Surprisingly the no AGM has a 80cca advantage and, is lighter. Theoretically, AGMs charge faster and are better for high drain applications.. we will see how long it lasts.
The charging system on these cars are pretty advanced, I think it can adapt to the new battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Buy a better battery. Buying the same POS that died in the first place is doing the same thing and expecting different results.
I also have a GM extended warranty so, I may never need to buy a battery. If I did I think I would try a Odyssey Battery.
 

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The charging system on these cars are pretty advanced, I think it can adapt to the new battery.
How does it know that it is now charging a flooded battery?

I also have a GM extended warranty so, I may never need to buy a battery. If I did I think I would try a Odyssey Battery.
GMPP does not cover battery as it is considered a maintenance item.

IMHO Odyssey is the best battery in the business. But they don't make a 94R. Although their rival Northstar does.
 

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Talking about charging curves in different types of batteries is really only something you need to worry about with batteries used in an industrial environment. As far as in your car, it really won't make any difference.

On paper, do they have slightly different charging curves? Yes. In reality, it doesn't matter. What you go with may not be the "ideal" charging setup for a certain battery, but it will work fine. Besides, most of the time, you aren't so much as charging your car battery, as maintaining it. You start your car, and from then on it pretty much is maintaining the charge. Any battery, when run very low, should be recharged with a real charger, not your car.

Whether you put a flooded or AGM battery in your car, it won't care. It will charge either of them just fine. In fact, agm batteries are commonly used as an upgrade on vehicles that came with flooded batteries, and if a car came with an agm battery, using a flooded one may be a step down, but it will work just fine.

Sorry about the long post, but I just didn't want anyone to over complicate this. Any battery will work. Some (agm) will work better than others (flooded).
 

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Talking about charging curves in different types of batteries is really only something you need to worry about with batteries used in an industrial environment. As far as in your car, it really won't make any difference.
That May be true in most cases, I wonder if the variable alternator in the cruze has some effect? It also at times is charging at a higher rate than a normal alternator(seem mine at 15V+ on more than one occasion).
 

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I am still struggling to understand what different battery types mean for our cars. What's in the link (
Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) Battery Information - Battery University ) helps a little, but I am still not completely clear.

In the old days, I could tell when I needed a new battery. The lights and accessories would dim/slow down more than I was accustomed to, when the engine was at idle or off. Signified the battery was not delivering as much current for a given voltage that it had in the past. Not sure how to tell now, with all these smart algorithms modifying the experience. How to tell, now? Is the first definite symptom a no-start? Or (hopefully), is the car's computer smart enough to tell me it's time for a new battery?

When I need a new battery, I would like to buy the brand and type that gives longest service life. Still hoping for an answer: What should I buy?

Oops, do the charging systems differ between Gen1 & Gen2, Diesel, and not? I have a Gen 2 gasoline.
 

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Talking about charging curves in different types of batteries is really only something you need to worry about with batteries used in an industrial environment. As far as in your car, it really won't make any difference.
That May be true in most cases, I wonder if the variable alternator in the cruze has some effect? It also at times is charging at a higher rate than a normal alternator(seem mine at 15V+ on more than one occasion).
Yes the charging system on the Cruze will vary output by load, and cause what looks like fluctuating voltage readings. This is normal.

For example, when at wot, sometimes the vehicle will drop voltage to around 12 volts to prevent parasitic loss through the alt, to give you max power at wot. Also, when costing or braking, the vehicle may bump up voltage to 15 or more, because you aren't using any power from the motor, so it will do some extra charging then.
 

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I am still struggling to understand what different battery types mean for our cars. What's in the link (
Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) Battery Information - Battery University ) helps a little, but I am still not completely clear.

In the old days, I could tell when I needed a new battery. The lights and accessories would dim/slow down more than I was accustomed to, when the engine was at idle or off. Signified the battery was not delivering as much current for a given voltage that it had in the past. Not sure how to tell now, with all these smart algorithms modifying the experience. How to tell, now? Is the first definite symptom a no-start? Or (hopefully), is the car's computer smart enough to tell me it's time for a new battery?

When I need a new battery, I would like to buy the brand and type that gives longest service life. Still hoping for an answer: What should I buy?

Oops, do the charging systems differ between Gen1 & Gen2, Diesel, and not? I have a Gen 2 gasoline.
What you SHOULD buy is an agm battery. They are maintenance free and are more efficient due to the plates being closer together. Only use a flooded battery as a last resort, in a case of you need a battery right now, but absolutely can't get ahold of an agm battery.
 

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Not sure how to tell now, with all these smart algorithms modifying the experience. How to tell, now? Is the first definite symptom a no-start? Or (hopefully), is the car's computer smart enough to tell me it's time for a new battery?
In my case, I was able to tell the old fashioned way. Cold start cranking slowed down a few days prior. Then on the day I got a new battery, it cranked so slowly it almost didn't start the car, then for a while my car wouldn't shift out of 1st gear.
 

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My battery died last month and it is only covered under the 3/36 coverage. Ended up buying an Advanced Auto Gel. WOW, that battery is a bugger to remove. Advanced offers free battery replacement at the store, but they couldn't get the forward clip to release. Had them lock it back down and my dealership put that battery in for me at no cost while they were reworking the sensor issues.
 

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When I need a new battery, I would like to buy the brand and type that gives longest service life. Still hoping for an answer: What should I buy?
I would opt for a Battery Plus X2 AGM dual purpose (as I did last summer), comes with free 60 month no hassle replacement warranty. So far trouble free and it cranks 2.0 TD @ -18F true temp very nicely which the OEM battery did NOT! :unsure: Note that I squeezed in a 27F (930 CCA !), with only slight mods due to the fact its about 0.5 in taller otherwise W and D are similar to the 94R .

https://www.batteriesplus.com/productdetails/sli27fagmdp
 

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I am still struggling to understand what different battery types mean for our cars. What's in the link (
Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) Battery Information - Battery University ) helps a little, but I am still not completely clear.

In the old days, I could tell when I needed a new battery. The lights and accessories would dim/slow down more than I was accustomed to, when the engine was at idle or off. Signified the battery was not delivering as much current for a given voltage that it had in the past. Not sure how to tell now, with all these smart algorithms modifying the experience. How to tell, now? Is the first definite symptom a no-start? Or (hopefully), is the car's computer smart enough to tell me it's time for a new battery?

When I need a new battery, I would like to buy the brand and type that gives longest service life. Still hoping for an answer: What should I buy?

Oops, do the charging systems differ between Gen1 & Gen2, Diesel, and not? I have a Gen 2 gasoline.
Instead of flooded with acid, the acid is absorbed in to glass mat that touches the lead. I think all AGM are SLA, Seal Lead Acid. With that, it means you can install the battery upside-down if you want and on the extreme end, it can probably take a literal bullet and still work, they are durable.
 

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Anybody run the Duralast Platinum AGM battery? http://www.autozone.com/batteries-s...ery/duralast-platinum-battery/319460_929860_0

I really like Autozone Duralast gold battery warranty, I had a bad luck stint for a couple years where I warranty replaced 4 Duralast golds batteries in 3 off my vehicles, like from draining them dead and 1 from a HF maintainer that killed the battery over a winter (like 4 volts, not charge taken).
 
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