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2019 Gen 2 owner here. Wondering if anyone else had any noticeable differences running premium in their engine.

I’m not sure if it’s just my brain tricking me but I put premium in the car for the first time sense I bought it and my car seems to be running a lot smoother (other than chevy’s terrible transmission). I find very little turbo lag anymore as when I was running regular gas the turbo lag seemed insane for me.

As far as I’m concerned, I’m going to continue running premium, has anyone else noticed a difference?
 

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2012 Cruze Eco 6 Speed
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Shell V-Power here.
 

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We discovered that back with the Gen1 Cruze, the turbo and engine were better designed for use of premium fuel. Most anyone that says they don't like how the engine runs we tell them to run a couple of tanks of premiumm and see how it is after that.
 

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yup but i only run it in hot weather/summertime normally i just throw 87 in it and call it a day...its a cruze not a racecar
 

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2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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Octane raises the fuel's flash point, the temperature where the fuel ignites without an ignition source. Therefore, the higher the octane rating, the more potential there is to make more power.
 
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After learning of the early LE2 engines' propensity to blow pistons, I've used only premium. Given how low the fuel usage in these can be if driven properly, and how little I drive, the difference in cost for me is almost nothing. Drivability is better, and that's worth more than the extra money.

Quibble about 'flash point'. That is the temperature at atmospheric conditions that a substance generates a fire-supporting vapor. I expect that regular and premium gasolines have virtually the same flashpoint temperatures. I don't know what the proper term is, but the practical property is expressed in 'octane rating'. Premium fuel has a higher octane rating and reaches its detonation point at higher pressures/temperatures vs. regular fuels.
 

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Yeah, octane is more accurately a rating based on the pressure that a mixture of of fuel and air and can be acted upon without spontaneously combusting.
 

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Sounds like the Gen 2 has the same issue with low octane and predetonation that the Gen 1 has. Bottom line is the car's ECU (Engine Control Unit) pulls power to protect the engine from predetonation when running on lower octane.
 

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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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Many people assume a higher-octane gasoline will automatically give their vehicle better mileage or more power, but that isn’t necessarily the case. Fuel with a higher octane rating can stand up to higher compression before it detonates. Essentially, the higher the octane rating, the lower the likelihood that detonation happens at the wrong time. Compression creates immense heat, a fuel must be able to withstand extreme temperatures, otherwise it can misfire prematurely. This issue, where the air-fuel mixture combusts spontaneously instead of from the spark plug, is known as “knocking,” named after the sound it produces. Our turbocharged engine creates more pressure than a normally aspirated engine of similar specs. This added pressure requires timing to be pulled when 87 octane is being used. If you use at least mid grade fuel, the added pressure causes less detonation. Less detonation means timing can be advanced for maximum power and sometimes, depending on how you drive, more fuel mileage.

Normally aspirated engines built for 87 octane fuel will not benefit from higher octane fuel. However, higher-octane fuels can potentially increase performance in some vehicles when towing heavy loads, especially in hot summer weather.

Paying a Premium for High Octane Gasoline?
 
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