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what sealant(s) did you use for the seal itself and the pan?
I will look at the parts receipt and get back to you. I will mention that it's whatever the dealer looked up. What was on the car originally was a light black. What I put back was gray.
 
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So while you're under the car and have the plastic shield under the engine off take a look at this wiring. The loom on this wiring would crumble on touch and some of it was AWOL all together. First pic runs from the front left corner bac
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k along the subframe. The front end of it has a connector on it and runs back to I assume the steering rack. It had 2 sets of twisted pairs of wiring so I would assume they are data bus wires. Dont want them shorting out! The rest of the pics show the wiring going to an a/c pressure sensor on the right side of the radiator at the bottom. The wiring runs along the fan shroud to a harness on the right side of the radiator. The fan could easily damage this wiring if left unaddressed. All pics are after I repaired it. Sorry no before pics.
 

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I own a 2014 Cruze Diesel with 115,000 miles and decided to install a new oil seal in the crankcase. Following the documented process, it took me longer (I'm 77 and getting up off the floor to get yet another needed tool wears me out), but I got it done. That silly little 1/2" tube that returns oil to the crankcase, however, is fastened to the crankcase with some kind of drive pin or rivet - I could not remove it. A quick swipe with a razor knife about 3/4" up from the metal fitting got things loosened up and the crankcase dropped after the usual prying and twisting. Before putting the crankcase back up I slid a 2" piece of 5/8" OD X 1/2" ID vinyl tube (from Menards) up the engine-mounted tube (a smear of oil helps). The tube is easily bent out of the way while bolting the crankcase in place, after which the vinyl tubing and 2 hose clamps are put in place (no oil leaks yet, after about 1,000 miles).
Since the exhaust line was going to be down I wanted to install new muffler bolts since these were known to corrode and break. Replacement flange gasket with 2 stainless nuts, bolts and washers from Rock Auto. The exhaust flange and bolts were a mass of rust and since hitting the bolts with successively larger hammers did not work, I ground the bolt heads off, thinking maybe there were welded in place (NOT). The bolts were striated (little tiny interference ridges) and the bolts were likely pressed in place at the assembly plant. More beating with a now BFH did not move them...heating the flange area with a propane torch eventually got them out. The bolts were corroded about 1/4 away.
Photos are for your reference...Swedge
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I own a 2014 Cruze Diesel with 115,000 miles and decided to install a new oil seal in the crankcase. Following the documented process, it took me longer (I'm 77 and getting up off the floor to get yet another needed tool wears me out), but I got it done. That silly little 1/2" tube that returns oil to the crankcase, however, is fastened to the crankcase with some kind of drive pin or rivet - I could not remove it. A quick swipe with a razor knife about 3/4" up from the metal fitting got things loosened up and the crankcase dropped after the usual prying and twisting. Before putting the crankcase back up I slid a 2" piece of 5/8" OD X 1/2" ID vinyl tube (from Menards) up the engine-mounted tube (a smear of oil helps). The tube is easily bent out of the way while bolting the crankcase in place, after which the vinyl tubing and 2 hose clamps are put in place (no oil leaks yet, after about 1,000 miles).
Since the exhaust line was going to be down I wanted to install new muffler bolts since these were known to corrode and break. Replacement flange gasket with 2 stainless nuts, bolts and washers from Rock Auto. The exhaust flange and bolts were a mass of rust and since hitting the bolts with successively larger hammers did not work, I ground the bolt heads off, thinking maybe there were welded in place (NOT). The bolts were striated (little tiny interference ridges) and the bolts were likely pressed in place at the assembly plant. More beating with a now BFH did not move them...heating the flange area with a propane torch eventually got them out. The bolts were corroded about 1/4 away.
Photos are for your reference...Swedge
View attachment 293226 View attachment 293227 View attachment 293228
Though maybe a full-size photo of the oil return tube would be best...
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I just thought I would add to this thread.

I had my dealer replace my water pump about a year ago. They also spotted an oil leak from the sensor on the back of the oil pan. They quoted me $1300 to replace the water pump, timing belt, drive belt and coolant outlet pipe. They also quoted $900 to replace the seal on the oil pan sensor. They said it required the pan to be dropped. I am sure it included the seal in question on this thread.

with that being said If you do pickup seal replacement I recommend to reseal this rear sensor seal. It seamed to me it was just a plastic bung ring I did not see any rubber seal but it may have deteriorated. I (not knowing about this pickup seal) chose to just use oil resistant sealant on the outside of the rear sensor myself and it stopped leaking. I have about 78k miles on my 2014. I will most likely be planning on doing this later this year.
 

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Is the oil pump pickup seal accessible from the top by removing the oil pump when I do my timing belt service? Would this be easier to do if I'm already servicing the timing belt? Or is dropping the oil pan the best way?
 

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I just thought I would add to this thread.

I had my dealer replace my water pump about a year ago. They also spotted an oil leak from the sensor on the back of the oil pan. They quoted me $1300 to replace the water pump, timing belt, drive belt and coolant outlet pipe. They also quoted $900 to replace the seal on the oil pan sensor. They said it required the pan to be dropped. I am sure it included the seal in question on this thread.

with that being said If you do pickup seal replacement I recommend to reseal this rear sensor seal. It seamed to me it was just a plastic bung ring I did not see any rubber seal but it may have deteriorated. I (not knowing about this pickup seal) chose to just use oil resistant sealant on the outside of the rear sensor myself and it stopped leaking. I have about 78k miles on my 2014. I will most likely be planning on doing this later this year.
The sensor (one above the oil drain bolt) can be 'resealed' from under the car. I have to keep mine sealed because of drips. I believe that is the oil level sensor. It pushes through from inside the pan and uses an E clip to stay in position. I believe the E clip bends which loosens it up, but I haven't had the courage to pull the clip out and replace it with a new one for fear of dropping the sensor into the pan.

For anyone that drops the pan, replacing the seal for the oil level sensor, PCV, and Dip stick tube are important in addition to oil pickup seal. All 3 of those spots cause oil leaks on these.

Is the oil pump pickup seal accessible from the top by removing the oil pump when I do my timing belt service? Would this be easier to do if I'm already servicing the timing belt? Or is dropping the oil pan the best way?
You have to drop the pan.
 

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Yeah, I think our sensor has been weeping for a while. But it's not at "drip" level yet.

The insurance adjuster saw that and thought the accident had caused that...I told her (and my buddy who owns the shop) that as long as it's not visibly dripping/leaking, the back of the pan is just wet because it always is and was before. Then they tried to screw my buddy out of the inspection fees (having the car on the lift to look underneath) because that leak as pre-existing...when you wouldn't have seen that leak until you had it up in the air and, oh, my wife ran over a tree so ya'll best be looking underneath anyway.

But I digress. :ROFLMAO:

I told my buddy (now that it's bought back) that if it is truly leaking to let me know, and I'll have him do the oil pick up seal fix (the one from Poland) while he's got the pan off, but I also told him to hope he doesn't have to take the pan (and the corresponding half of the front of the car) off.
 

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Yeah, I think our sensor has been weeping for a while. But it's not at "drip" level yet.

The insurance adjuster saw that and thought the accident had caused that...I told her (and my buddy who owns the shop) that as long as it's not visibly dripping/leaking, the back of the pan is just wet because it always is and was before. Then they tried to screw my buddy out of the inspection fees (having the car on the lift to look underneath) because that leak as pre-existing...when you wouldn't have seen that leak until you had it up in the air and, oh, my wife ran over a tree so ya'll best be looking underneath anyway.

But I digress. :ROFLMAO:

I told my buddy (now that it's bought back) that if it is truly leaking to let me know, and I'll have him do the oil pick up seal fix (the one from Poland) while he's got the pan off, but I also told him to hope he doesn't have to take the pan (and the corresponding half of the front of the car) off.
If he does I’d love a full write up with photos/video
 

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I have this on my laundry list for this weekend/next week. The procedure for removing the pcv pipe running up the intake side of the motor says to “use a rotory tool or similar to score a line in the fastener ‘the one that was pressed in or whatever they did’, use an impact to loosen it, remove and replace that grommet deal/seal.” Has anyone done it differently? I saw one gentleman cut the line and spliced it afterwards. Not sure how you could use a rotory tool in that area. What a pain to drop the pan

Note: Using a small rotary cutter tool, cut a slot in the head of the bolt. Use an impact driver or similar device to overcome the initial resistance to loosen the bolt.

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You can drive a 12 or 13 mm 12 point socket onto the head of the bolt With some long extensions from up top in the engine bay that's how I did mine
 
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Why on earth they didn't just...make it a regular bolt...is bizarre.

But good to know - I'll be doing this (my aluminum "seal" from Poland just arrived the other day) when I do my oil change in a month or two - and this would surely have puzzled me going into it blind.
 
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I’m going with the rubber replacement one. No particular reason. We also need to replace 2 seals within the intermediate shaft (I guess that’s what it’s called) when we remove the right driveshaft. No clue on part number. One orange, one black as well as the normal axle seal. But hey! Get an oil change and a trans refresh out of it!
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there were two options AllData gave me. With intermediate driveshaft or without. i didnt look really, so this is "with" . this is tranny side inner most (1) Is orange, outer (2) is black.


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and this is obviously the driveshaft.
 

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How much trouble did it give you coming out? I know when I swapped the axles on my Cobalt the stub shaft came out with it, so it was a little more work overall (since I was replacing the axle - though I didn't need to in the end - ideally that should have stayed in the trans, would have kept it from pissing trans fluid on the ground after a while), but getting it out/in can be a bit annoying just simply due to a lack of leverage.
 
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I haven’t started mine yet. I was curious if we have enough wiggle room to push the hub side inward past the knuckle and swing it away. I doubt it, I just replaced my wheel bearings and it had some play obviously, but probably not enough. **** we only need the thing out of the way for two lousy bolts. As you can probably tell, not looking forward to this one
 

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Yeah, that's kind of what I was hoping. For my Cobalt, I was able to compress the axle enough to squeeze it out of the hub, I believe while it was still in place in the knuckle.

It's really a shame we can't just remove the bolts and leave it in place...
 
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