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On my 2011 Chevy Cruze I have a P2076 "IMT" code. I've been told that this is an Intake manifold tuning valve sensor, problem. My mechanic found a rod apparently pulled out of a small plastic housing which is located on the intake manifold unit between the inline engine and the fire wall. He now thinks I will have to purchase and replace the entire intake manifold unit. He estimates the cost to be around $1200.00. I have had this engine check light on my care for about two weeks. It has not had any affect on the performance of the car. Is this a common problem and if so how can it be fixed.
 

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Take it into the local Chevy dealer and have them look at it. If it's related to the intake manifold, it will be covered under powertrain warranty.
 

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93 GM 4.3 L engine had that tuning valve sensor, with a two digit code. Never did figure out what that thing did and the shop manual didn't explain it. But the contact pins were corroded, cleaned those and the code went away.

Shows what little I know about my Cruze, didn't know it had this sensor either. Tuned intake manifolds were very common back then with very long pipes, sure didn't see anything like this on that 4.3L. Will see if I can find this sensor on my Cruze. May I use the excuse its darn cold outside?
 

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I don't know if this was ever answered

On my 2011 Chevy Cruze I have a P2076 "IMT" code. I've been told that this is an Intake manifold tuning valve sensor, problem. My mechanic found a rod apparently pulled out of a small plastic housing which is located on the intake manifold unit between the inline engine and the fire wall. He now thinks I will have to purchase and replace the entire intake manifold unit. He estimates the cost to be around $1200.00. I have had this engine check light on my care for about two weeks. It has not had any affect on the performance of the car. Is this a common problem and if so how can it be fixed.

I ran into he same problem about a year a go with my 213 Chevy Cruze.I looked all over for a solution even going as far as buying a new throttle body. Finally I found a picture of someone that was asking about a part and why was it hanging. I took a look in my Cruze and I had the same thing wrong. That little rod pops out between 70,000 and 100,000 miles. It's a systemic problem in the 1.8l. The only solution is to change out the whole intake. I've tried glue, tape, and string to make it stay but because of the heat in that area nothing last for long. You won't see and loss of power just a little more gas burning (not really much a couple of miles) because that rod operate the flaps between the intake and exhaust ports which are forced opened when you stepped on the gas. I finally took my Cruze to a GM Dealer and paid the money to have it fixed because I was tired of the check engine soon light coming on and having to turn it off with my reader every time I started the car. No I can say at 140,000 miles it was a great call! Your mechanic was right you need to replace the intake/exhaust housing there is no fix for it. Also if you're over 30,000 mile GM will not cover it.
 

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Negative. U do NOT have to replace the whole intake manifold, the imt is bolted onto the manifold and be easily removed. The actual part is around $110 online. And to further throw mud in the water, u can even open up the imt and replace the little motor inside it for around $6. Ive dont it to around 4 cruzes already.
 

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Negative. U do NOT have to replace the whole intake manifold, the imt is bolted onto the manifold and be easily removed. The actual part is around $110 online.
Can you post some links?

Doug
http://www.xiuyansensor.com/?Mexico-control-valve-assembly-1038815S01-510861-p6359.html

Let me tell u how this went. I found it and was throwing cartwheels. So i ordered it and waited 24hrs for a confirmation email or something, but didnt get anything that showed i purchased it. So i called my credit card and reprted that i may have bought from a bogus website. So investigation and waiting and was issued a full refund. Then whatayaknow, it arrived in the mail. So yes, it is a real website.
 

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Intake manifold tuning hack

Here's my ******* attempt at a cheap fix for the intake manifold tuning problem, P2076, on the LUW 1.8L engine.

There's a crank which drives a vertical rod up and down which in turn drives the vanes/damper to tune the intake runners for optimum air flow into the cylinders.

The rod has a ball on the lower end which snaps into a socket on the crank. On the upper end, a socket on the rod engages a ball on the vane/damper crank.

The failure that has repeatedly occurred on mine has been that the ball on the bottom of the crank keeps popping out of the socket resulting in a check engine light and P2076.

I've popped it back in with limited success. I tried to increase the ball's diameter slightly by adding a wrap of Scotch 33+ electrical tape, and that held up for a couple weeks. Another attempt, this time using some shrink tubing, failed right away.

This time around, I replaced the shrink wrap with a fresh layer, then drilled a 7/64" hole thru the ball and rod and then the crank. I made sure the hole in the ball was centered. Then installed the ball into the crank and drilled thru that. I had a little tool that holds the bit (for counter sinking) and was able to use that to hand drill the crank. There wasn't much room get a real drill into action there, but with a sharp (brand new) bit, the hand turning didn't take too long.

The 7/64" bit was chosen match the zip ties I have on hand. It allows the ribbon of the zip tie to fit thru the hole but the head is too big, and thus does not come thru as desired.

A small washer and another zip tie complete the fix.

I haven't trimmed the zip ties yet. They're easier to see that way. I sanded the first zip tie's head down for clearance on the back side of the crank, but it still rubs some when the crank turns, so some more engineering might be needed there :) That is, I need to sand the head down on its end face rather than its top face.

The assembly seems to be working well, but only a few minutes of testing has elapsed thus far. The CEL is out - on its own - I didn't clear it - and the throttle response is way better!

The system should not exert much extraction force on the ball, so the zip tie should be adequately strong to keep it in the socket. I have seen the crank over rotate past bottom dead center, which will indeed pop the ball out, but the times I've seen it over-rotated, the ball was already out. That is, the ball probably came out first, then the crank over-rotated trying in vain to tune the intake.

Otherwise, if it does over-rotate with the crank attached, then that would indicate the computer is not properly detecting the position of the intake tuning vains/damper.

Anyway, as long as the crank doesn't go past bottom dead center, and heat doesn't make the zip ties brittle, this should be a durable repair. Fingers crossed.

Doug

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Cool.....I did see the photo, getting ready to fix my cruze. Thanks
Check out my “howto” repair on p2076 issue.

 

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HOPEFULLY EVERYONE READS THIS! ENTIRELY! PLEASE REPORT THIS BY CALLING GM DIRECTLY AND SPEAK WITH SOMEONE. THEYVWILL ASK LAST 8 OF VIN # THEN NOTATE YOUR VIN. THEN SPECIFICALLY ASK THAT THIS PROBLEM BEING REPOTED IS CONSIDERED FOR A "SPECIAL COVERAGE WARRANTY". 1-866-522-9559 like the negative battery terminal cable and the gas pedal are all special coverage for my 2014 Cruze LS 1.8L and many others. I have had the intake manifold replaced completely 2x with in 40k of each other under the powertrain warranty. But once you hit 100k or 5 years you are forced to pay for the repair unless there is a special coverage warranty. Fyi GM is asking $680 for just the intake manifold. NO LABOR INCLUDED. Bullshit I tell ya.
 

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Intake manifold tuning hack

Here's my ******* attempt at a cheap fix for the intake manifold tuning problem, P2076, on the LUW 1.8L engine.

There's a crank which drives a vertical rod up and down which in turn drives the vanes/damper to tune the intake runners for optimum air flow into the cylinders.

The rod has a ball on the lower end which snaps into a socket on the crank. On the upper end, a socket on the rod engages a ball on the vane/damper crank.

The failure that has repeatedly occurred on mine has been that the ball on the bottom of the crank keeps popping out of the socket resulting in a check engine light and P2076.

I've popped it back in with limited success. I tried to increase the ball's diameter slightly by adding a wrap of Scotch 33+ electrical tape, and that held up for a couple weeks. Another attempt, this time using some shrink tubing, failed right away.

This time around, I replaced the shrink wrap with a fresh layer, then drilled a 7/64" hole thru the ball and rod and then the crank. I made sure the hole in the ball was centered. Then installed the ball into the crank and drilled thru that. I had a little tool that holds the bit (for counter sinking) and was able to use that to hand drill the crank. There wasn't much room get a real drill into action there, but with a sharp (brand new) bit, the hand turning didn't take too long.

The 7/64" bit was chosen match the zip ties I have on hand. It allows the ribbon of the zip tie to fit thru the hole but the head is too big, and thus does not come thru as desired.

A small washer and another zip tie complete the fix.

I haven't trimmed the zip ties yet. They're easier to see that way. I sanded the first zip tie's head down for clearance on the back side of the crank, but it still rubs some when the crank turns, so some more engineering might be needed there :) That is, I need to sand the head down on its end face rather than its top face.

The assembly seems to be working well, but only a few minutes of testing has elapsed thus far. The CEL is out - on its own - I didn't clear it - and the throttle response is way better!

The system should not exert much extraction force on the ball, so the zip tie should be adequately strong to keep it in the socket. I have seen the crank over rotate past bottom dead center, which will indeed pop the ball out, but the times I've seen it over-rotated, the ball was already out. That is, the ball probably came out first, then the crank over-rotated trying in vain to tune the intake.

Otherwise, if it does over-rotate with the crank attached, then that would indicate the computer is not properly detecting the position of the intake tuning vains/damper.

Anyway, as long as the crank doesn't go past bottom dead center, and heat doesn't make the zip ties brittle, this should be a durable repair. Fingers crossed.

Doug

.
I drilled a hole and used a piece of fence wire 2 years ago, still works perfectly.
 
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