Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was intending to check the plugs in my new car since I have 28 K on it. While attempting to remove the coil pack/rail all the plug boots were pretty well "stuck" in the plug walls and the rail came detached from the boots in plug walls and the entire assembly came apart. The boots were in the cylinders and the springs came loose also. With this being much more than I was intending to do and not sure what would happen trying to free the boots and reattach them to the rail, I made sure the all the springs and boots were realigned and proceeded to reinstall the rail and tighten it down. After doing so, I proceeded to start the engine and much to my surprise it ran as smooth as before. I took the car out for a small "road trip" around the city (75 miles in hwy and hills) and there was no apparent change in performance. I determined I will leave well enough alone until I need to address this at a later time.

Could or would this be covered under the power-train warranty?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
If there's something wrong with the car then they'll cover it under your bumper to bumper, but considering the car runs well theres nothing to cover, you should just tell the dealer to do the plugs, and pay for them to do the work and struggle with the stuck boots.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually the BTB is already over The car was first in service 5/31/2014 so the 3 years is up even tho the mileage is only 28K. Maybe part of the reason the car was so inexpensive? There have no problems so it is not to worry about. As long as the car runs fine I am not going to try to fix that which is not broken. Actually that idea should have stopped me from trying to look at the plugs in the first place. But my 2011 and 2012 had no problems with getting to the plugs prob bc I removed them with in the first year I had the cars. This one I am sure has not been touched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
I had the same problem with my daughter's Eco. I used a rubber tipped blow gun after the coil pack was removed. Just blow in the center hole, and it will release the boot from the plug. Put a little dab in silicone grease in the boot when reassembling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,596 Posts
As easy as it is for the boots and springs to detach from the ignition rail I'm really surprised GM doesn't sell the boots and springs separately. As long as you got the boots out without tearing and reassembled prior to putting the ignition rail back in you should be fine.
 

·
Resident Forum Drunkard
Joined
·
9,273 Posts
Hey guys , The Patman Super Moderatored his coil pack back into shape ...
 
  • Like
Reactions: obermd and Patman

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,296 Posts
Call this post production work, silicone grease goes on those boots, battery electrical connections, help retard corrosion, and on all those O-ring sealed lamps, when that O-ring bakes on with the heat of the bulbs, will never get them off.

For spark plug boots, made my own tool, piece of 3/4" strap steel with a 90 degree notched end. Stupid pro boot removers are like a pair of pliers, and boots are like a Chinese finger puzzle, the harder you pull the tighter they get. With my tool, it compresses the boot.

But the only problem with it, does not work on the Cruze, blocked by that ignition coil module, no way to get at the bottom of the boots. So they get an extra dose of silicone. Those springs inside of the boots are to short, get hung up on the shoulders inside of the boots, stretched those out another 3/8 inch, and make darn sure all four are sticking out before putting the coil module back in. Has to be done at an angle so you can see all four boots are on top of the plugs, then straighten it out and push it down.

Then the brakes, may only find a couple of drops of silicone on the caliper guide pins, also load that boot with silicone, helps keep road salt out. Same with the piston boots, they pop out, put a rim of silicone inside the boot and push it back on, also helps in keeping road salt out.

Rest is done with anti-seize, under those torque plate clips, trap road salt and where the pad tabs touch those clips. Pull the rotor and paint the hub with anti-seize, cast iron on steel, if you don't do this, cannot pull the rotor off. Also on the outside of the rotor where the tire fits on, that center hub rusts out, can't even remove the tire, lug nut bolts get it, every break one off because the lug nut is rusted on tight?

Could barely pull off the rear tail light housings, used my suction vacuum puller for this, has a plunger on the end that jams hard into a rubber grommet. Open up that grommet a tad and coated that with silicone, sure doesn't rattle, but can slide it off with my fingers, don't need a crow bar.

Yep, post production work, may take two tubes of silicone, seven bucks each, but sure saves a lot of headaches later.

Ha, often make the comment, just want to remove a component, don't want to break it. Silicone also helps on those snap together plastic parts, those tabs break off very easily.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As long as you got the boots out without tearing and reassembled prior to putting the ignition rail back in you should be fine.
I did none of the above. None of the boots came out/just detached and the springs came loose. I just made sure all was lined up properly
and tightened the rail back down. Now wondering if I should remove the boots and reassemble the entire coil rail or leave well enough alone.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you have the coil pack off, get a thin feeler gauge and apply a ton of lubricant to it (I use silicone spray). Slide it down and work your way around the boot. It will eventually come loose.
I think I might try that only because I am leery of the way I put it back together besides I wanted to see the plugs anyway.
Eventhough it seems to run OK I am wondering about arching if something isn't quite together right. Just didnt want to do it yesterday
before hearing from you guys


Thx.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,383 Posts
As easy as it is for the boots and springs to detach from the ignition rail I'm really surprised GM doesn't sell the boots and springs separately. As long as you got the boots out without tearing and reassembled prior to putting the ignition rail back in you should be fine.
GM does not have the boots, but NAPA has them. I think they are around $6-7 each. And I think Standard Motor Products also has them, but I don't see these in the Rockauto catalog.

Look for a video from "briansMobile1" on youtube. He shows how to spray with silicone spray and use a pick to get under the bottom of the stuck boot.

Compressed air is a good idea as well. My 2012 is still rolling with original plugs. I strongly suspect that I'll be buying boots if I change the plugs.

I believe the two holes for the coil pack are tapped for the GM official coil tool, which I remember someone on the sonic form saying is M8 bolts.. It's either M8x1.25 or M8x1.5. At the time I looked at Menards and they did have threaded bolts that might make it easier than a vise grips or fingers to get the coil off.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rivergoer

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I actually did my plugs yesterday, and my coil pack came off with the boots still in the head. They were REALLY in there. I was trying to get the tip of my finger into the boot past the knuckle so I could bend it and pull out the boot, but as I was pushing down the boot broke free! Amazed, and thinking it was a coincidence, I tried pushing the next one down and it worked beautifully. I did this to all four boots and they all came out with no damage.

I couldn't tell you why, I think it has something to do with those 3 "baffles" at the top of the boot. Pushing them down rather than pulling them helps break them free from the head. Just thought I'd share
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,383 Posts
JetMike-

Thanks for the thoughts. I might be in for a battle after 5 years, but there's no misfires so I'm leaving things alone.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,296 Posts
I load my boots up with dielectric grease, never go beyond 15K miles, always get carbon build up on the plug's center electric insulator, shorts our a part or all the the spark.

Sounds like when you pulled your ignition module, the boot stayed on the plugs and came off the module. Ran into this on used stuff for my kids. Can take a screwdriver, heat it until its red hot, bend the tip 90 degrees, dip it in oil to hardened it, and use this to pull the boots out from the bottom. Didn't say this was easy, watch your language around women, but it works.

Other problems leaving the plugs in a long time with an aluminum head, the threads of the head come out with it. Helps to pour in Seafoam into the engine to help ease that carbon build up and carefully work them out. But still have that KD spark plug hole repair kit. Coating the threads with a thin coat of anti-seize helps prevent this.

Head is aluminum, plug is steel, dissimilar metals and alway have current flowing through the base of the plug, hey, they copied electroplating. On plugs that have threads inside the combustion chamber, really stupid, put those in my machine lathe and cut those off. Aren't doing a thing to keep those plugs torqued properly. When dealing with stupid people, have to learn to make adjustments.

They do cast in valve seats on these aluminum head engines, could also cast in steel spark plug seats, but prefer to give KD business.

Could take it to your dealer, or like my dealers tell me, trade it in for a new vehicle. Least in aircraft, do preventative maintenance, unheard of with land vehicles, keep on driving them until you are stalled in some godforsaken place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I actually did my plugs yesterday, and my coil pack came off with the boots still in the head. They were REALLY in there. I was trying to get the tip of my finger into the boot past the knuckle so I could bend it and pull out the boot, but as I was pushing down the boot broke free! Amazed, and thinking it was a coincidence, I tried pushing the next one down and it worked beautifully. I did this to all four boots and they all came out with no damage.

I couldn't tell you why, I think it has something to do with those 3 "baffles" at the top of the boot. Pushing them down rather than pulling them helps break them free from the head. Just thought I'd share
Thanks JetMike! After an hour of screwing around with them I came across your post and it worked perfectly! Had them out in a heartbeat.

2014 with 100 000 km. No problems at all.

Cheers!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top