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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dare I try...Anyone had any luck with the programming method of the keyless fob on a '17 push button start when you only have 1 remote? The method that takes 30 minutes I've found online? I have a new oem fob and the 1 original. Should I even try or just bite the bullet and pay to have it programmed? Scared of messing up the anti theft amoung other things. Advice appreciated!
 

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My 2017 came with one fob. I bought a new one and went through the wait 10 minutes 3 times procedure with no issues.

My 2016 came with one fob. I bought a couple of used ones, tried the 'I have a fob' procedure and the 'wait 3 times' procedure, both times it refused to recognize either used fob, but it re-recognized its own fob without difficulty with the 'wait 3 times' method.

I concluded that the fobs are permanently paired to the car, and can't, at least not DIY, be paired to a 2nd car. Too bad, I'd love to have one fob to run both cars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a brand new oem remote ready to go. Just kinda scared me that it erases the old remote with the procedure. You've had no issues with remote start or the anti theft with either key?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just used the 30 minute method as per the manual. Worked perfectly. I did get a theft deterrent has been triggered email at the end, but all works fine. Saved myself $115 at the dealer. Thanks for the help.
 

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I concluded that the fobs are permanently paired to the car, and can't, at least not DIY, be paired to a 2nd car.
I think it's more likely that there's something different about the fob (perhaps working on a different frequency) that prevents it from being paired. To "lock out" a fob would take significantly more work with little benefit. Frankly, I doubt if the fob even knows it's been paired.
 

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Frankly, I doubt if the fob even knows it's been paired.
That was the situation with every fob I ever had up until now, but those fobs were for remote entry only, not for driving.

My 2016 and 2017 take the same part number fob.
Yet the new fob I bought could not be paired to my 2016 after I paired it to my 2017.
 

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I think it's more likely that there's something different about the fob (perhaps working on a different frequency) that prevents it from being paired. To "lock out" a fob would take significantly more work with little benefit. Frankly, I doubt if the fob even knows it's been paired.
Fobs marry themselves to vehicles all the time. When married to a car the fob basically makes itself "read only" if that makes any sense.



I was told once a fob is programmed to a car it has to be "reset'/'cleared' to be paired to another car.
There's no above the board way to clear a fob that I know of. Only black market devices. With the price of new fobs it just doesn't make much sense to go through the hassle of trying to get one virginized again.
 

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Fobs marry themselves to vehicles all the time.
Cars marry themselves to fobs all the time. The fob sends a unique code as part of the command and the car checks to see if it belongs to it. It has to be this way because the car-to-fob link is too short range (about 3') to work at remote start/unlock distances.

I fail to see why GM would have made the fob pair itself with the car.
 

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Who knows. All i'm saying is it's not uncommon nor unique for a fob to be rendered virtually useless once it's been learned to a car.

****, on our 1st gen Cruze. The dealer was able to have a key cut AND the fob set to our car without me ever bringing the car in.

I picked up the key / fob and it worked. Zero programming required. Again, a marry and useless fob once that car is gone.
 
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