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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey friends!

Has anyone tried this yet? My Cruze seems to love it. I've noticed that on cold acceleration, it's "smoother" and regens around town are less frequent than regular #2 diesel. I never smell "French fries" or anything like that and I have only seen it at 76 stations here in California.

Would you use it? Per the advertising, it has higher cetane. That's good, right?
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You run the risk of voiding your warranty.

GM only warranties up to 20% biodiesel because of the way regeneration of the DPF is performed. To heat the DPF there is extra fuel injected during the exhaust stroke. That fuel is supposed to vaporize, get swept out the exhaust, and then the first exhaust treatment is a catalyst where this excess vaporized diesel ignites to heat the exhaust gas up past 1,200F to burn off any soot in the DPF. The problem is that biodiesel has higher vaporization and ignition temperatures, so the risk is that some of the fuel will cling to the cylinder walls and get swept past the piston rings to end up as fuel diluted in the oil. You'll then have potential for oil polymerization with the biodiesel reacting in the oil sump.
 

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I ran b99 for a period of time on my diesel truck

I don't recommend it. Lacks stability and will clog fuel filter.

It has less energy than standard diesel and will combust at a lower temp. This will effect the regeneration and clog DPF over time.

I would not go higher than the recommended b20 for the diesel Cruze

Jeff
 

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It has cetane between 75-95!!!! No wonder you are happy with it.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, wait, this isn't biodiesel. It's diesel fuel that meets the D975 specifications and is based on biological sources, but it isn't an ester fuel.

Looks like it's fine for your car after doing some quick searches on the subject.
Yeah, I've been scared to put that bio-diesel in my tank. I will definitely stay away from bio.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I ran b99 for a period of time on my diesel truck

I don't recommend it. Lacks stability and will clog fuel filter.

It has less energy than standard diesel and will combust at a lower temp. This will effect the regeneration and clog DPF over time.

I would not go higher than the recommended b20 for the diesel Cruze

Jeff
I've seeb the B stuff here but always have been scared to run it with this emissions hardware. Ha! Thanks.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, wait, this isn't biodiesel. It's diesel fuel that meets the D975 specifications and is based on biological sources, but it isn't an ester fuel.

Looks like it's fine for your car after doing some quick searches on the subject.
Thanks. It's confusing when you're at the pump and you see "renewable"-I kept thinking french fry oil, LOL.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·


It has cetane between 75-95!!!! No wonder you are happy with it.

Jeff
Heck yeah, I hope it catches on and that more stations offer it... It seems good so far.

Thanks Barry and Oregon for your replies!

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How does the cost compare to alternatives in your area?

Any MPG loss? I regularly drop about 2mpg switching from No.2 dinosaur sludge to what I assume is B5 biodiesel (pump just says "biodiesel.")
 

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I really wish we could get this stuff on the East Coast. I've read nothing but good things for any diesel. Would love to try it in the Cruze as well as the older diesels. Alas, I don't see it coming out here since the powers to be and the public are more interesting in getting rid of diesels rather than doing things to make them cleaner. It may not make a huge difference on one car but factored in across all the commercial trucks on the road it could for sure. I know supply would likely have its limitations but still wish it were an option out here.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey Phil,

So far, I’ve seen the reverse- an increase of 1-2 mpg in town and my regen cycles are slightly further apart.

Dino-diesel in town regens occur every 230-240 miles for me and mpg during regen typically drops to 24-26 mpg.
With R99, both regens so far have been 260+ miles apart and the mpg during the regen is consistently between 27-30 mpg.

It seems to be an improvement on all fronts and not to mention 10+ cents cheaper per gallon according to GasBuddy. I agree with others about BIO- my last and ONLY tank of that stuff was stinky during cold starts/idle and my distance between regens dropped to 140ish miles. Definitely staying away from that stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey Bodhi,

I totally agree, it should be promoted and encouraged in all areas and locations. If I end up experiencing anything strange, I'll be sure to post about it here at some point.

Thanks, everyone!
 

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Per the advertising, it has higher cetane.
Is there a cetane rating listed on the pump? California requires a minimum of 53, so 100% of diesel fuel sold in the state is pretty high quality (and also more expensive).

Cetane is similar to octane in that once you "have enough" there is no benefit to having more. With a gasoline engine, once the fuel octane rating is enough to give ideal performance in the engine, it doesn't help to go up any higher. Our diesel engines call for the federal minimum cetane rating of 40, and you'd have to find some absolute garbage fuel to get that low. The average cetane rating of fuel in the USA is about 45-47 because most brand-name stations use at least a minimum additive package to bring the number up a bit. Cetane of 45 or above virtually guarantees any diesel engine runs fine on the fuel. For a little bit extra air quality in places that matter, bumping the cetane rating up to above 50 (like in California and also the eastern parts of Texas) gets you a fuel guaranteed to give you thorough, complete combustion for the lowest amount of soot possible to come out the exhaust.

A cetane rating of anything higher than the low 50s does nothing. It doesn't help combustion or pollution any. Having a fuel with a cetane rating of 70 or greater like is claimed for this renewable diesel does help other petroleum diesel fuels in that you can blend the renewable fuel with petrodiesel to bring up the cetane rating of the petrodiesel. A blended fuel would burn better and cleaner thanks to the renewable fuel content just the same as biodiesel fuel blends burn cleaner due to that biofuel bringing the cetane rating up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey Barry,
I looked at the pump signage earlier during a fill-up and it is rather vague. I'll check again next time I fill-up to be sure. The website does say that it is 70 plus, though:


Do you think mixing a tank of regular #2 and this renewable stuff would be safe to try? Engine shouldn't mind, right?

Thanks.

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Hey Barry,
I looked at the pump signage earlier during a fill-up and it is rather vague. I'll check again next time I fill-up to be sure. The website does say that it is 70 plus, though:


Do you think mixing a tank of regular #2 and this renewable stuff would be safe to try? Engine shouldn't mind, right?

Thanks.

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Been doing alot of reading on this new wonder fuel....

It can be blended with #2 diesel in any mix you desire.

I found one place selling it here in oregon. I need to set up an account to use their card lock.

It isn't inexpensive here and will probably mix it 50/50 while using vehicle around town to avoid issues with dpf clogging...

Jeff
 

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Do you think mixing a tank of regular #2 and this renewable stuff would be safe to try?
You can fill up with 100% of this renewable fuel. It is different than biodiesel and there are no restrictions on using it in any diesel engine. If the cost is manageable compared to regular petroleum diesel fuel, you should fill up exclusively with this renewable fuel.
 

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I found one place selling it here in oregon. I need to set up an account to use their card lock.

It isn't inexpensive here and will probably mix it 50/50 while using vehicle around town to avoid issues with dpf clogging...
I'm jealous that you've got an outlet selling this fuel even if you have to have an account with a special card. I'm in the midwest and I doubt this fuel will make it anywhere near me anytime soon.
 

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In Florida it's not mandated to post a Cetane rating decal at the pump. The ones that voluntarily posted a cetane rating have all been a rating of 40. Cetane rating of 40 seems to be the lowest that is used.
I wonder if a 40 rating is garbage fuel quality even if you use a reputable oil company like Shell, Exxon and Chevron.
 

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In Florida it's not mandated to post a Cetane rating decal at the pump. The ones that voluntarily posted a cetane rating have all been a rating of 40. Cetane rating of 40 seems to be the lowest that is used.
I wonder if a 40 rating is garbage fuel quality even if you use a reputable oil company like Shell, Exxon and Chevron.
Diesel fuel had zero required specifications up until about 1993. It was whatever oil refiners wanted to sell and it was a widely variable, "bottom-of-the-barrel" fuel in terms of quality. It was the leftovers from oil refining that were sold cheaper than gasoline.

About 1993 is when the EPA first gave us Low Sulfur Diesel, that was 500ppm for on-road fuel and 5,000ppm for off-road fuel. This was the first step toward improving air quality. At the same time the 40 cetane rating minimum was established as a fuel standard.

Beginning in 2007 it is Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel with a 15ppm limit on sulfur, and standard refining practice often gives us 0ppm sulfur or very near it. I'm not 100% certain but I believe 500ppm is now the allowed standard for off-road fuel. However, refineries don't want to maintain two fuel standards so current practice is that 100% of fuel in distribution for all use is ULSD. Home heating oil, on-road diesel, off-road diesel, all of it is ULSD so there can be one fuel specification in the distribution network for ease of handling and sale.

The refining for ULSD gives us a fuel with lots of quality specifications, and the end product is about 45-47 cetane at the pump. From any refinery making diesel fuel for sale in North America, I can't picture there being anything as low quality as 40 cetane. Winter diesel fuel products have some drop in cetane rating due to the heavier wax components being removed, but you can easily boost this with a cetane improver additive and most fuel stations do this when the fuel is loaded into tank trailers for dropping at the fuel stations. There will be an anti-gel additive added that also boosts cetane a few numbers.

Florida might be a bit different, but the quality of modern diesel fuel still holds up even if they aren't putting winter additives in there (because in Florida, WHY?!). You'll probably get fuel of about 45 cetane as a minimum, and just put some Power Service in there to bring up up another 3-6 numbers depending on quantity of additive.
 
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