Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner

21 - 40 of 74 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
will probably mix it 50/50 while using vehicle around town to avoid issues with dpf clogging
Skip that plan. Just buy regular fuel from a known good station and put an additive in there to clean injectors and boost cetane. The biggest contributors to soot creation (which loads the DPF) are injectors that don't have a good spray pattern and fuels that could be higher in cetane. Both of these lead to more soot. If you keep injectors clean and use fuel with good cetane numbers you will have good, clean combustion in your engine and it will develop more power, be more fuel efficient, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Skip that plan. Just buy regular fuel from a known good station and put an additive in there to clean injectors and boost cetane. The biggest contributors to soot creation (which loads the DPF) are injectors that don't have a good spray pattern and fuels that could be higher in cetane. Both of these lead to more soot. If you keep injectors clean and use fuel with good cetane numbers you will have good, clean combustion in your engine and it will develop more power, be more fuel efficient, etc.
Hi Barry,

I think my plan is quite valid.

We had dpf issues running high cetane Chevron fuel with stanadyne additive. So I am looking for something "more".

I have looked at a number of tech papers and presentations - it is very consistent that renewable diesel produces 30% less soot than en590 diesel. With less soot I have less DPF issues.... And on top of that the soot that is created is more "reactive" - the soot is different between en590 and R99. It burns off more easily for shorter regen cycles.

Multiple city fleets report dramatic improvements with dpf regenerations using renewable diesel.


Best Regards
jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Hi Barry,

I think my plan is quite valid.

We had dpf issues running high cetane Chevron fuel with stanadyne additive. So I am looking for something "more".

I have looked at a number of tech papers and presentations - it is very consistent that renewable diesel produces 30% less soot than en590 diesel. With less soot I have less DPF issues.... And on top of that the soot that is created is more "reactive" - the soot is different between en590 and R99. It burns off more easily for shorter regen cycles.

Multiple city fleets report dramatic improvements with dpf regenerations using renewable diesel.


Best Regards
jeff
Just make sure the lubricating properties are equal or better. Fuel pumps and fuel injectors are critical in the new diesels today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Just make sure the lubricating properties are equal or better. Fuel pumps and fuel injectors are critical in the new diesels today.
In terms of lubricity, renewable diesel needs additives to achieve en590 spec for hfrr (lubricity).

I plan to use stanadyne performance formula as a precaution.

Oregon diesel duel is mandated to be 5 percent biodiesel. Chevron imports soy biodiesel for this purpose here in Oregon.

Even 2 percent biodiesel will provide enough lubricity to meet en590 euro fuel spec for hfrr.

So if I do mix R99 and Chevron diesel 50/50 I am still in very good shape ... Fuel will meet tighter en590 fuel spec and will produce 15 percent less soot.

best regards
jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
As a side note. If I were living in California, I would not bother mixing renewable diesel 50/50 with Chevron pump diesel. I would run straight renewable diesel (R99).

The issue here in oregon is cost of R99. It is not subsidized as it is in California. And it is only available in one location. So.cost of R99 here is much higher than pump diesel. More than a dollar higher...

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Oregon diesel duel is mandated to be 5 percent biodiesel. Even 2 percent biodiesel will provide enough lubricity to meet en590 euro fuel spec for hfrr.
So... isn't the "R99" fuel 5% biodiesel if that's a state mandate? Shouldn't they be blending and marketing as 94% renewable diesel, 5% biodiesel, and 1% "other" (probably petroleum diesel) to meet the biodiesel requirement?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Looks like it's probably the same as Propel HPR+. I've been running that almost all the time since new. Good to know I can go to 76 as well.

Assuming it is, it's not a "biodiesel" formulation, it's a regular diesel from a renewable source. Lower carbon footprint and 75 cetane. As a bonus, it doesn't stink like regular diesel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Looks like it's probably the same as Propel HPR+. I've been running that almost all the time since new. Good to know I can go to 76 as well.

Assuming it is, it's not a "biodiesel" formulation, it's a regular diesel from a renewable source. Lower carbon footprint and 75 cetane. As a bonus, it doesn't stink like regular diesel.
Hey Froyo,
Do try the 76 R99 and see if you notice a difference. For me, it was night and day compared to that Propel stuff and #2 dino diesel.


Neste appears to be the same but I need try it and see if the car approves or not.




Sent from my SM-N9700 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
No, looks like it's all in NorCal. I haven't been up there in a long while.

I think it feels a little peppier with the HPR+ but it's not a massive difference.

I think a lot of it is the cleaning properties it has, cleaning the gunk out of the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
In terms of lubricity, renewable diesel needs additives to achieve en590 spec for hfrr (lubricity).

I plan to use stanadyne performance formula as a precaution.
If the R99 fuel were affordable where you live (you've said it is not cost competitive), I'd fill up with R99 and maybe put a pint of Wesson oil in the tank for lubricity. That's probably the cheapest additive to use.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
If the R99 fuel were affordable where you live (you've said it is not cost competitive), I'd fill up with R99 and maybe put a pint of Wesson oil in the tank for lubricity. That's probably the cheapest additive to use.
Vegetable Oil ash and polymerized VO are terrible things to have in a modern diesel. A 1980s Mercedes would let you run many, many gallons of SVO before the prechambers and piston rings were hopelessly coked up.
A Cruze diesel would likely see greatly reduced DPF life with that fuel additive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
If the R99 fuel were affordable where you live (you've said it is not cost competitive), I'd fill up with R99 and maybe put a pint of Wesson oil in the tank for lubricity. That's probably the cheapest additive to use.
I was thinking about it a little more - and I previously said I would use stanadyne performance formula to make sure I had enough lubricity. On second thought I would use their lubricity formula - comes in much more concentrated form and less expensive. I don't need cold flow protection and cetane boost when running R99... Only lubricity additive as precaution (they probably mix in enough)...

And I agree with the other statement about using straight veggie oil - not something I would feel comfortable doing either...

jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Vegetable Oil ash and polymerized VO are terrible things to have in a modern diesel. A 1980s Mercedes would let you run many, many gallons of SVO before the prechambers and piston rings were hopelessly coked up.
A Cruze diesel would likely see greatly reduced DPF life with that fuel additive.
Really? I assumed a clean vegetable oil free of sulfur would be fine for use in small quantities.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
I'm sure small quantities of VO would leave small quantities of residues, but those residues are pretty evil, and the CTD has a very expensive filter designed to catch all the residue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
So much fail and misinformation in this thread.

I used HVO aka Renewable Diesel for over 3 years now. In 4 different diesel vehicles.

I always dose with a quality fuel additive @ 400:1 ratio. With addition of fuel additive that improves combustion Diesel #2 gives better performance than Renewable diesel.

Renewable Diesel causes ~ 5 % reduction in fuel economy. Any FE increase you experience is due to reduced DPF regeneration cycles (which can also be offset with additive to D2).

HVO aka Renewable diesel causes a reduction in low end torque. This may be caused by the high cetane which reduces peak cylinder pressure. This may also be the cause of reduced FE with this fuel.

Renewable Diesel causes fuel system leaks in older diesels. It is common and well documented with older VW 1.9L TDIs when owners switch to it.

I track all my fill ups with the Fuelly app so my data is accurate. I also use oil analysis to track wear metals and soot % in engine oil.

My final thoughts

There was a study I read that showed D2 blended with RD in a 70/30 ratio showed a ~ 1.5% FE improvement, so this may be the sweet spot for someone who has time to experiment.

I used to use RD exclusively in my Modern diesel vehicles that have DPF and SCR. I’ve noticed that D2 w/ additive is better so I don’t use it anymore except as a blend.

Biodiesel bends, especially B20 don’t burn as clean and increase oil soot %. RD is exactly the opposite and burns relatively clean, even without the additive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
What additive do you use?
Hi Barry,

I've been using Amalgamated TDR-FL for a couple years now. Only additive I've ever used that actually had noticeable results. It's reduced my engine oil soot % by 50-75 % over the course of an oil change in two different test vehicles. It has some organic metallic ingredients which are catalysts and improve combustion, and don't show up on the SDS. I think one of them is MMT as I find 25-30 ppm of Manganese in my oil samples which isn't a wear metal you'd normally find in those concentrations.

The dose is 10 mL per gallon of diesel fuel added to the tank which is 400:1. I have noticed a slight increase in Fuel Economy as well but can't say for sure because of external factors like weather, traffic, etc.. but maybe like 2% at the most fuel economy improvement on CARB 53 cetane diesel #2.

The engine oil stays clear until about 5K miles, then it starts to get a little dark. I check my engine oil every couple fill-ups and the effect is dramatic. Even after 8K miles the oil still wasn't pitch black, and soot was only @ 0.1%. This comparison is on engines equipped with EGR as well so the effect works with emissions controlled cars which would cause the oil to get dirty faster.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
I wouldn't run an additive with mmt in my gen 2 Cruze diesel. If concentration is too high or with regular use you can foul sensors or catalytic converter. Not worth the risk to me.

There are a number of fleets that have switched over to R99 without any reported issues like leaks etc.

R99 does have approximately 5 percent less btu per gallon so reduced mpg is expected.

But if the overall mileage is the same due to reduced regen and regen duration, then who cares?

I will be running R99 as a very low risk method to drastically reduce my probability of having dpf issues on short trips etc. The only downside might be getting a little less mpg, but getting a little less mpg.along.the way is fine with me and well worth the trade off.

And on longer trips I will mix in diesel #2 for economy/cost effectiveness....

Jeff
 
21 - 40 of 74 Posts
Top