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I have '12 1lt RS with rear drum brakes, I've been thinking about converting them to disc. Has anybody done it or know anybody that has? If so, how easy is it do accomplish and how much did it cost? Thanks


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do a search this has been talked about before
 

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I think the conclusion was that it wasn't worth it.
 

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I think the conclusion was that it wasn't worth it.
Agreed, but four wheel discs are so responsive! Granted my only experience with the drums are on non adjusted rentals, but I was so glad to get my car back.


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Rear drum removal is essentially the same as removing front drums, except for that pesky parking brake. Start by removing the wheels and then the dust cap, the center nut and washer and the brake-drum bolts.
 

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Rear drum removal is essentially the same as removing front drums, except for that pesky parking brake. Start by removing the wheels and then the dust cap, the center nut and washer and the brake-drum bolts.
That wasn't quite what he was asking haha. But it's a step in the what I imagine is a long process, isn't very cost effective either. When I bought my cruze one of the reasons for the rs package was I preferred discs. Not worth the time to do a swap for dd

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Converted my 1978 Fleetwood from rear disk to drums, the key reason, the calipers were crap. Parking brake was worthless even on a slight incline. Using the owners manual recommend procedure didn't work either, apply hard pressure to the service brake while pressing hard with your other foot on the parking brake pedal.

Then self adjustment was terrible, was done by pumping the parking brake, but was a friction disk inside the caliper that kept on slipping, like a ratchet that wouldn't ratchet, just go forward and back. No aftermarket units were available, only option was to buy new calipers at a Cadillac dealer, back then a 300 bucks each. With inflation that would be 850 bucks each today. Still would not cure the parking brake problem, but at least would self adjust for about a year. Then that friction disk with teeth on it would wear a groove in the piston, and would not adjust again.

Learned that drum brakes off a 78 DeVille would fit, but these were the days before liability laws, Found a nice one at a local wrecking yard and got everything I needed for 20 bucks. Brought my tool box along. Can't do this today, they charge list prices for old stuff. Was before ABS so only one brake line had to be replaced, nice to have all those bending, cutting, and flaring tools.

GM made improvements in the 90's, and could by a rebuilt caliper for around 120 bucks, this was the only choice, as the old ones were a pile of rust, as I recall proportioning valves were also different.

Price of the Cruze rear calipers are not too back, 120 bucks, but with a 50 buck core charge, actual price would be around 70 bucks.

Got stuck with these on my 2012 2LT, wish it would have drums, cheap and easy, but wanted a spare tire with a manual transmission. These appear to be well plated, but still coated with anti-seize, and they finally got the parking brake right. So see what happens.

Replacing all the brake lines on my old 92 DeVille was a nightmare with ABS, never drove this car on road salt, but still rusted out from the outside in. See the Cruze has plastic coated lines, maybe they will last.

Never replaced the rear shoes on my 04 Cavalier, still good for my stepdaughter with a 130K miles on it. But every 50K miles or so, have to remove and clean them. Screw that black brake grease, lucking if it last a year then won't self adjust anymore. A long time ago, switched to Permatex anti-seize, now this stuff really works. Just a little rust on the lower anchor, they bind and won't self adjust. Anti-seize prevents this.
 

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Rear discs on my Cruze are trouble free at 18 months and handbrake has not altered at all. Previous Commodore had original discs at 250,000k and were still good, only had pad changes every 3 years or so. This took about 20 minutes using a car jack only. Hand brake had an inbuilt drum as part of the rear disc so park brake is always good if used correctly and was never adjusted.
 

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Rear discs on my Cruze are trouble free at 18 months and handbrake has not altered at all. Previous Commodore had original discs at 250,000k and were still good, only had pad changes every 3 years or so. This took about 20 minutes using a car jack only. Hand brake had an inbuilt drum as part of the rear disc so park brake is always good if used correctly and was never adjusted.
1988 Supra is this was, uses standard inherently self adjustable rear calipers, just like the fronts, and cheap to replace. Then with drum brakes on the same disk for parking that never wear out. A very intelligent way of doing this, wish Chevy copied this.

Wife still asks why I am pumping the parking brake at a traffic light, same old reply, service brakes are getting low. I can feel that click, mostly about two, then the service brake is back up to proper level. As long as I can feel those clicks, all is okay.
 
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