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First question, has anyone done a rear disc conversion on these things? Not really interested in the performance aspect(although it is a plus) but with my wheels, the drums just look out of place sitting there. I'd imagine it would require a proportioning valve from a Cruze with Discs as well as all the necessary items. My question is, do I need to change hub assemblies or is it a direct bolt on? The way everything is set up looks very similar.

Next question, does any Cruze have independent rear suspension? I'm trying to avoid having to fab control arms, camber arms, toe arms, sub frame, etc... Is the Z-link IRS? UK Cars, Hatch backs, etc..

Thanks for the insight!
 

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I can't remember the specific terms behind everything but I do remember that it's more hassle than it's worth because it's NOT a direct bolt on. It has something to do with the axle setup itself. Some talked about using the Verano parts to make the transition but again, it would cost way too much and may even be impossible with the way it's currently built. Hopefully a gearhead chimes in soon.
 

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All Cruze's use the Torsion beam setup. The Z-link adds stability, but still not independent.

Do you know what bags you used for the front? I would like to start piecing together an air setup.
 

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There were a total of 3 rear axles used in Cruze production from 2011 to 2013 model years (I have no idea bout the 2014s). One axle was made with the mounting holes for only drum brakes, one axle was made with mounting holes for only disc brakes, and the third axle was a universal one. If you go to your dealership, they can look up your VIN and tell you if you have the golden axle, I for one know that I do.

As for actually doing the conversion, you will need the new mounting brackets, calipers, pads, rotors, axle/hub to caliper lines, and I believe you might need a bigger reservoir/master cylinder; although don't hold me to that. If you do in fact have the golden axle, my word of advice would be to scour junk yards for a 2LT or LTZ cruze that rear ended someone, and pull everything off of it and do the swap. It will be cheaper than going through your dealer for all OEM parts, and you will be guaranteed to have OEM brakets/etc.

As for the Axle, its a solid beam. The Z-Link is just a sort of factory sway bar, without being a sway bar. The way that you can tell if it is indeed an Independent Rear Suspension is if the hub is attached to an arm that extends towards the middle of the car, and bolts onto a center brace. Where as our control arms go towards the front of the vehicle, and then attach via a giant bushing (from the looks) to a solid beam axle which spans the width of the car.

Hope that helps.

EDIT: I know about the rear disc conversion because back when I got my car I looked into doing the swap as well.
 

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There were a total of 3 rear axles used in Cruze production from 2011 to 2013 model years (I have no idea bout the 2014s). One axle was made with the mounting holes for only drum brakes, one axle was made with mounting holes for only disc brakes, and the third axle was a universal one.
I can't imagine from a profit standpoint there is a rational reason for three different entire axle assemblies for the difference of rear disc/drum. I don't doubt this though but it may be the difference of early/late production and model specific.

My guess is if you have an early LS, 1LT or ECO, it will have the axle that can can use both. However later models of those may get the drum only axle. That would also mean later model 2LT and LTZ would get a disc only axle.

Now if there is a axle that can do both it would seem on inspection there would be mounting brackets or holes unused. If you say your car has the axle that can do both, have you ever looked when you had the car up in the air?
 

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With the current problems I am having with rear disk brakes, wish I had drums. Been have fits with GM caliper rear disks brakes for years. On a 78 Fleetwood, only available from the dealer at 300 bucks, (1978 dollars) each. Major problem was rust and the ratcheting mechanism. That one converted to drums when parts were a lot cheaper, none of this electronic crap, no ABS to fool with, and just needed a short parking brake cable that looped to a wye.

Hopefully with the Cruze will get plated ones now.

Glad to see coiled springs in the rear with isolated shock absorbers that can be replaced in minutes. Struts can be a nightmare plus $$$$$ to replace. Driving an Eco, 1LT, 2LT, and an LTZ, we liked the ride in the 2LT the best. They call this shopping before you buy, well the LTZ is okay, but we didn't want automatic climate control, a major headache, and an automatic transmission.

Guess you can say we are getting mature and still would like to hang unto our teeth and hearing. But wasn't this way back then. Use to really beef up my cars, no points back then, speeding ticket was 10-20 bucks, and none of this computer crap to keep records of it.

Today with points, and computers, not only a huge court cost, but double jeopardy with your auto insurance, will skyrocket your rates, even with only one ticket. So just poke along with traffic.

At one time, was cheaper to buy all the parts for a car, because you had to assemble it yourself, this is really history. Just to purchased a couple of parts, cheaper to buy a new vehicle. A lot has changed.
 

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Oh, self adjusters don't work with drums, this less than five buck kit and take care of it if even necessary, mostly just cleaned and relubricated is all that has to be done.



And this can be done without having to remove the wheel cylinder. But not on disk, if you can find repair parts that you can't, caliper has to be complete removed to do anything on it, that also requires an ABS pump bleeding procedure. Or in brief, a lot of extra money for parts and labor. For what very little gain that is received. Also shoes do a much better job when parked in holding the car. In particular, on a boat ramp.
 

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I can't imagine from a profit standpoint there is a rational reason for three different entire axle assemblies for the difference of rear disc/drum. I don't doubt this though but it may be the difference of early/late production and model specific.

My guess is if you have an early LS, 1LT or ECO, it will have the axle that can can use both. However later models of those may get the drum only axle. That would also mean later model 2LT and LTZ would get a disc only axle.

Now if there is a axle that can do both it would seem on inspection there would be mounting brackets or holes unused. If you say your car has the axle that can do both, have you ever looked when you had the car up in the air?
I have never looked close enough to figure out; however being that I was at my dealership in person, and they ran my VIN which showed which out of three possible axle codes for the Cruze at that time, and that it was in GM's system saying it had both mounting points... I took them for their word. And because I was looking into a disc conversion, we looked at the two other listed axles for the Cruze and found out that one only had mounting holes listed for disc, and the other only had mounting holes listed for drum.

Now, as for manufacturer standpoint, who knows... But for some reason they had 3 separate axles listed at that time, and I'm going off of what I know to be a fact.
 

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The axles them selves don't have the mounting points. There is a backing plate between the hub assembly and the axle.

The hubs are the same between the disc and drum cars. This means the backing plate can be switched easily from one to the other.

It is roughly $900 in parts from the dealer to buy every piece of the rear brakes including hardware.

The master cylinders have the same part numbers for both equipped vehicles.

I know on my 14 Lt there is a residual pressure valve in the rear lines near the drums which I have only ever seen on disc equipped cars before

Its actually a much easier swap than what most people try to make it out to be. What gets difficult (for some) is doing a disc swap on a car that never came from the factory with available discs. Take the 95-05 cavalier, discs were never an option but there are quite a few of us that have converted to disc brakes properly.

I've done the needed research on the Cruze rear brakes as I planned to design and sell a simple bolt on rear disc swap using parts that could be purchased from most automotive part stores.
 

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I suggest u forget about that, way too costly.

But you could powder coat your drums in a nice Black or whatever color u like. Powder coating is almost indestructible.
 

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Here is a man that knows what he is doing ..


The axles them selves don't have the mounting points. There is a backing plate between the hub assembly and the axle.

The hubs are the same between the disc and drum cars. This means the backing plate can be switched easily from one to the other.

It is roughly $900 in parts from the dealer to buy every piece of the rear brakes including hardware.

The master cylinders have the same part numbers for both equipped vehicles.

I know on my 14 Lt there is a residual pressure valve in the rear lines near the drums which I have only ever seen on disc equipped cars before

Its actually a much easier swap than what most people try to make it out to be. What gets difficult (for some) is doing a disc swap on a car that never came from the factory with available discs. Take the 95-05 cavalier, discs were never an option but there are quite a few of us that have converted to disc brakes properly.

I've done the needed research on the Cruze rear brakes as I planned to design and sell a simple bolt on rear disc swap using parts that could be purchased from most automotive part stores.
 

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There was a thread before about this and there are people convinced that the rear drums give less problems than the discs. I ask this question, who has had rear disc problems V who has had rear drum issues? Rear drums are not even an option in Australia and I haven't heard of any issues with rear discs. In 250.000 km the rear discs on my Commodore never gave any problems and the park brake which was a drum built into the rear disc never needed adjusting as it was only used when the car was stationery and just didn't wear at all.
My Cruze is 2 years old and the brakes and parking brake are still the same as when I picked it up new. At the last service when road tested all was well.

And finally if the drums are so good why arn't they available for the front. And when the car has 4 or 5 adults on board the rear brakes do a lot more than 20% of the work.
 

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I suggest u forget about that, way too costly.

But you could powder coat your drums in a nice Black or whatever color u like. Powder coating is almost indestructible.
Not really as costly as dsm stated above. Also $900 to the guy who installed a full SPLQ audio system with 6 super tweeters alone (if I remember correctly), custom fabricated an air ride system, and has gone through two sets of wheels in the past year, isn't that much.
 
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