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Snapped a wheel stud

23294 Views 34 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  Invierno
One of the wheel studs wasn't torquing down, so I kept loosening and tightening it with my clicker torque wrench. The stud decided it had enough, so it snapped at well less than the 100 ft/lbs the torque wrench was set to. :angry: All of the other studs torqued down fine and clicked at 100 ft/lbs. I'm not sure if it was stretched, or if I made a mistake. I'm guessing that I made a mistake.

So, I get to disassemble the brakes and pop out a wheel stud. Great.
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there a .50 knrul so any honda stud will work if you wanna get some stronger ones
One time, I managed to strip the threads of the lug nut while it was still on the stud. It would spin freely, but wouldn't come out and off the stud, and the wheel was still on...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You may want to have your torque wrench calibration checked. In aviation circles, calibration checks on torque wrenches is technically required (annually, I think).
This snapped stud snapped at much less effort than the other ones. All the others took a lot more effort before the wrench clicked. I know, effort is subjective at best.
 

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This snapped stud snapped at much less effort than the other ones. All the others took a lot more effort before the wrench clicked. I know, effort is subjective at best.
I've discovered that my problem rate on studs has dropped significantly ever since I started using an impact wrench. I know not everyone has access to one though.

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I've discovered that my problem rate on studs has dropped significantly ever since I started using an impact wrench. I know not everyone has access to one though.

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I'll disagree with you on that one. Always was taught to hand thread the lugs back on as to make sure you don't cross thread them, which is easy to do with an impact wrench. But to each their own :)
 

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I'll disagree with you on that one. Always was taught to hand thread the lugs back on as to make sure you don't cross thread them, which is easy to do with an impact wrench. But to each their own :)
Who said I don't hand-thread them in first before lightly running the impact wrench to twist them? I've personally replaced two studs at a Jiffy Lube because I happened to have a hammer and two spare studs in the car. I paid to have a tire rotation done and the guy doing it didn't thread the lugnuts by hand first before tightening them with the impact wrench and cross-threaded them. I nearly called him a blooming idiot in front of everyone, but lucky for him, they were on the rear hub and I could replace them easily. I got that tire rotation done for free.

You can start twisting the lugnuts first so you don't cross thread them, and continue to tighten them with the impact wrench to save time.

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Who said I don't hand-thread them in first before lightly running the impact wrench to twist them? I've personally replaced two studs at a Jiffy Lube because I happened to have a hammer and two spare studs in the car. I paid to have a tire rotation done and the guy doing it didn't thread the lugnuts by hand first before tightening them with the impact wrench and cross-threaded them. I nearly called him a blooming idiot in front of everyone, but lucky for him, they were on the rear hub and I could replace them easily. I got that tire rotation done for free.

You can start twisting the lugnuts first so you don't cross thread them, and continue to tighten them with the impact wrench to save time.

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True, but you didn't say that in your original post. I'm not being picky here just wanted to make sure others don't get the idea to go nascar style and lock 'em down with the impact. But yes, a hand thread and a light impact works great. :) Followed up with a proper torque from a torque wrench.
 

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I've done the same thing, but it was a bolt on a Honda CBR engine block. The problem was the torque wrench had a special way you had to handle it so I was seeing like 50 ft lbs when it snapped the head off. Then my friend was like, "oh yeah btw, that wrench is funky" :angry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've discovered that my problem rate on studs has dropped significantly ever since I started using an impact wrench. I know not everyone has access to one though.

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This one was hand-threaded 1/3 of the way down and run down with a cordless impact. Definitely not cross-threaded.

BTW, the dealer I stopped at did not have a separate listing for the wheel stud. So they'd have to order a whole new hub assembly at $150-170 to do it for me. I'll skip that and DIY again.

Anybody for a writeup on how to replace a front wheel stud on a Cruze? I'll likely get to it this weekend, as the others are properly torqued and the car is driving normally.
 

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That's strange, I wonder if your stud had a defect in it.
I would think the stud replacement should be pretty strait forward, unless there's something special about our hub/rotor assemblies. OTOH, if you do it yourself, it'd be a great opportunity for a how to for the board.
 

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Take a look at Rockauto.com. I was looking at parts today, and I think I saw wheel studs. I think they were by Raybestos. The question becomes how do you push them out without hurting the wheel hub bearing?

I thought I remember something about a wheel stud press in part of the rental tools at Autozone. I would think a hammer wouldn't be great for the wheel bearing..

Bearings are also in the rockauto catalog, but that's a hundred bucks.
 

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Maybe I missed it, but you didn't mention if it was front or back. I did some searching and also can't find just the studs. Everywhere I look it's the hub assembly. Either way, you'll need to remove the hub. Not sure how hard that's going to be, the diagrams I can find don't go into much detail on how the hub is attached and held in place. It looks like it's a few bolts that holds the hub on, but I can't be sure.

Edit: carbon02 is right. rockauto.com has the studs for $1 or so a piece (but sold in packs).
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=299513
 

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Sciphi-

I thought I seen a tool for pressing out the studs, something similar to the following post. How to: Wheel stud removal and ride height adjustment - Corvette Forum

This guy is using a 6" C-Clamp as a press to press them off. I suspect there's a way to get it off without pulling the hub, but I suspect the rotor is going to have to be pulled.

Keep us posted.
 

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According to AllData, a ball joint remover.. CH 43631 is used. Not sure exactly what that tool is, I didn't google it. Rotor removal, and the bad lug comes out in a position similar to where the caliper bracket is installed. A new one is installed by pulling through with washers and a new lug nut. Flat side to the washers. I think they are assuming that you obtain an open lug nut like what's used on the LS, vs. the Acorn style nut used with the LT.

This is from 2012 Cruze All Data

Pays 0.3 hours for 1 lug, and 0.1 hours for each additional lug. Does not include R&I Hub Assembly.

They don't give any part numbers for the stud. I'm thinking it may be avalible if there's a procedure, but then maybe not!

AllData makes it look easy, let us know what it's really like to do!
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This looks like it can be done on the car. The dust shield goes away from the caliper, so it's possible to rotate the snapped stud into position and pop it out.

I freed my OEM lug nut from the snapped stud earlier, and it took barely any effort to turn it out with a 19mm socket on the lug nut and Channellocks on the stud. No signs of cross-threading. Either I'm stronger than I think, the torque wrench was off although it clicked on all 19 other nuts, or it was a bum bolt. I'm still betting I did something unintentionally wrong, and knackered it.

Writeup coming this weekend.
 

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What should the torque be? And where did you find the spec? If you get the stud out, Dorman has a crapload of wheel studs, and NAPA should also be able to match one up. I can't imagine our cars have unique studs.
When installing it, get an extra lug nut and some grade 8 flatwashers. Put oil on the washers, stack a couple on the stud, then thread the nut on, taper facing out. Tighten it with a ratchet, not an impact, slow and steady until it's seated. Throw that nut out, it may have been compromised, so sense taking a chance. I ALWAYS put a dab of anti-seize on the threads. Also on the backside of aluminum wheels, any place they contact the steel hub or rotor. A little goes a long way.
 
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