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So I have a 2011 cruze 1.4T that was making the typical whooshing noise from the A/C compressor. However when I got to work yesterday I noticed that the noise changed and got 10 times louder. Looked under the hood and sounds like the bearing in the compressor is about to seize up, I used to work for a chevy dealer so I know the sound is coming from the compressor and I was waiting for it to do this because of the whooshing noise. I just hit 75k miles and I know the compressor isnt covered under the powertrain warranty but I am a little irritated that the compressor bearing is going with only 75k miles on it. I had a older focus that I traded in for my cruze that had 225k miles on it with the origional compressor and the A/C still worked. What are the chances of GM doing a goodwill warranty on my compressor because its a known issue and I still have under 100k miles? If they don't cover it should I chance buying a "AC delco" one from online or should I take it to the dealer and spend roughly $750 to have it fixed (that's what I was quoted this morning). I have also talked to a certified mechanic at a chevy dealer and he agrees that its my A/C compressor that is making the noise.
 

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Goodwill?
Highly unlikely.

You can buy new Delco from Rock Auto at about 1/3rd dealer price......note I said new, not a reman.

I'm sure you can find a independent that will have no issue installing a quality part....just ask around.

Some independents may adjust their flat rate up a bit to cover the part margin they are loosing but that should be considered fair.

Rob
 

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There is a bulletin on valve lash in the AC compressor. I had mine replaced. Fortunately I had additional warranty, BUT if your service dept is good, they can help you deal with Chevy on the issue.
 

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Is it just making this noise with the AC switched on? Or is it doing it all the time with the AC off?

With the latter, idler pulley bearing is going, either that, or the gap on the clutch plate is too small and rubbing.

Been calling these limited lubricated bearings and always was a problem. Already replaced that idler puller bearing on many vehicles. Not sure about the Cruze, for some 20 odd years, GM was using an interference fit on the clutch plate, and peening in that double roll bearing. Had to drill three #10 countersunk holes to hold the new one in.

Not easy to learn what size these bearings are without looking first and can get them from a bearing supplier a heck of a lot cheaper than any auto parts store. Some vehicles also had a short belt to bypass the AC compressor, so you keep on driving your vehicle. Another case where these single drive belts are a PITA.

Other two vehicles use a separate belt for the AC compressor when engineers weren't pounded by bean counters. All you had to do was to remove that belt so you still can use your vehicle.

Describe your symptoms.

I don't trust anybody to fool with my AC systems, take shortcuts. With PAG and R-134a and the system open, by removing the compressor, moisture gets in, creates a paste and an acid the will eat your new compressor away. System has to be flushed, blown out, new accumulator, I use NAPA lacquer thinner, that crap they sell at hardware stores is not pure lacquer thinner.

Draw a deep vacuum and inject the correct amount of new PAG, this way the system will last. Also have to charge by weight on these things with that variable displacement compressor.
 

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FWIW if the dealer doesn't work a deal for you, I use a good independent shop for my A/C work. A good indy shop should be quite a bit cheaper than the dealer.
 

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I that whooshing noise heard from the vents or from under the hood itself? I have a noise present when using the front window defog and I believe the a/c, but the noise is only from the vents.
 

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After warranty was up, we got a chirping noise from the blower motor, the top of the blower wheel was rubbing against that plastic shroud. Fixed that by gluing 1 mm thick shims, basically washer at the bottom of the blower motor to drop it by that much. Cured that noise.

But when it got cold, got that noise back again, thought contraction and maybe 1 mm was not enough, but learned my wife did fully close her dash vent that made a terrible racket. Just fully closed it, but could have opened it just a little to cure this.

Use to put the AC compressor on the top of the engine, then some dimwit decided to move it to the problem exposed to all kinds of road salt causing all kinds of clutch problems, even eating away at the high pressure lines since they are using a low grade of aluminum alloy. More problems, also the clutch idler pulley didn't last nearly as long, and also rust on the compressor shaft that would grind away at the compressor seal.

Again, new problems that were never problems before, a throw away pop can is using a better alloy than is what is used in our vehicles. But hey, the Cruze finally came out with an under engine cover, finally some protection to keep that road salt off of it. But then these idiots wanted to butcher it.

Another battle from buying a new car, fought this way up top. First off you idiots put the oil filter on the exhaust side of the engine, and second you put the O-ring for the cap on the threads of the cap where it could bind! Now you want to butcher my shield because of your stupid mistakes, I want my money back! Either this or give me a ten year warranty on my AC compressor, said, you can keep your shield.

Already mentioned you have to use silicone grease on that recovery coolant tank cap, have to also use this on that O'ring on the oil filter cap, otherwise the darn thing will bind and twist. more idiots at work. Least now with that shield, my compressor is still corrosion free. And since I change my own oil, never spill or waste a drop, or get a leak, or way over torque my drain plug.



If you do have clutch problems and take it to a shop, say they have to remove the compressor to replace that bearing, more idiots. All you have to do is remove the mounting bolts, wire the compressor down, so you don't have to go through all that extra work of recovery and opening the system exposing that PAG oil to moisture. How does it feel to deal with even more idiots. Been doing this work for over 50 years!

You can use a wrench to remove the drive belt, don't have to fool with that upper engine mount, just move the belt to the side, unless its bad. Put your index finger on each sheave, gently rotate each one in a rocking fashion while progressing several full rotations and feel for any binds. For the AC compressor, both the clutch plate and the compressor itself, this will tell you if there is a problem. Should be smooth and very easy to rotate.

Sound also travels seven time faster through metal than through air, so where you think the noise is, can be several feet away. Takes this fine touch.

Another stupid thing they are doing is switching on the compressor when the ambients are between 33 and 70*F, very little moisture in the air, pressures are very low, so just wearing the darn thing out, oil and seals are very stiff. Least the designers of my 88 Supra were smart, Japanese hired the best American engineers to show them how to design a car, ha, was one them. When at AC switch is off, the compressor is off period.

And you wonder why you have problems.
 

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Wow, the Cruze actually went back to using shims for the clutch gap, ignore that 0.024", some idiot wrote this, 0.012" is enough. Also ignore removing the compressor, another idiot wrote this if just have clutch problems and greatly adding to the work. Can also use an impact wrench and hold the clutch with your hand to remove that nut.

Don't show that bearing inside that compressor sheave, whatever it is, can be replaced. The way parts are priced today, when clutch kits were available, want almost as much for this as the entire compressor.

"Removal Procedure



  1. Remove the A/C compressor. Refer to Air Conditioning Compressor Replacement (LUJ) See: Service and Repair\Removal and Replacement\Air Conditioning Compressor ReplacementAir Conditioning Compressor Replacement (1.8L LUW) See: Service and Repair\Removal and Replacement\Air Conditioning Compressor Replacement.
  2. Clamp air conditioning compressor in a soft jawed vice.





  1. Remove the compressor clutch plate.

    • Remove the bolt.
    • Counterhold with GE-48965 - wrench.
Note: Re-use spacer washers when refitting.



  1. Remove the spacer washers.





  1. Remove the retaining ring (1) from belt pulley.
  2. Pull off the compressor pulley (2).
Installation Procedure



  1. Install the compressor pulley on the compressor housing.
  2. Install the retaining ring in the groove in the compressor housing.





  1. Install the compressor clutch plate. Insert the spacing washer (2).
Caution: Refer to Fastener Caution See: Service Precautions\Vehicle Damage Warnings\Fastener Caution.



  1. Tighten the compressor clutch plate bolt to 13.5 Nm (119 lb in) . Counterhold with GE-48965 - wrench (1).
Note: Check reference gap between clutch plate and the belt pulley at 4 points with feeler gauge and form mean value.



  1. Inspect reference gap of compressor clutch. Reference value: 0.3 mm - 0.6 mm (0.012 in - 0.024 in ) .
Note: If the reference gap is too large, install thicker spacing washer (2) between compressor shaft and clutch, install a thinner one if the reference gap is too small. Spacing washers available: 0.1 mm, 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm.



  1. Correct the reference gap for the compressor clutch. Detach the compressor clutch plate and change spacing washer.
  2. Repeat inspection as described.
  3. Remove the A/C compressor from the bench vise.
  4. Install the A/C compressor. Refer to Air Conditioning Compressor Replacement (LUJ) See: Service and Repair\Removal and Replacement\Air Conditioning Compressor ReplacementAir Conditioning Compressor Replacement (1.8L LUW) See: Service and Repair\Removal and Replacement\Air Conditioning Compressor Replacement."
 

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Days of R12 were so much easier until Al Gore came along, was banned over night, and conversion to R-134a was put on the burden of the consumer.

First off over 55% of the total CFC or R12 production was used by the government, only approved means of cleaning and used by the tons to learn ocean currents.

Another 35% was used in spray cans, over 5% for other miscellaneous applications, medical was one of them.

Intended purpose was for all refrigeration replacing a very dangerous ammonia that was used previously, about 1.5% of this was used for automotive.

Mineral oil used for R-12 was not hygroscopic, didn't have to flush it out. Tube and fin condensers and evaporators were easy to clean, replaced by parallel flow that became a throwaway product. Scharder valves were used, practically identical to what you find in your tire valves, replaced by quick couplers like used in air hoses that leak like crazy.

A6 compressors were practically indestructible and used a ceramic seal, replaced by a cheap single lip seal. R12 was cheap, for years, only about 20 cents per pound. Moisture was not a problem, and also very easy to vacuum it out. But not with PAG, changes the chemical characteristics of it.

Culprit was claimed that chlorine used in its manufacture was depleting the ozone layer, but the percentages of it was infinitesimal compared to the huge amount of chlorine used in drinking water and put into the atmosphere at sewage processing plants.

All lies buy a very crooked government. Al Gore is a crook and should be sued for trillions for the damage he caused. R12 was 100% biodegradable, R-134a is not and now being blamed for global warming.

For the consumer, about 3-4 times the cost to repair an R-134a system than an R12 one, these are the facts.
 
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