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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all...

This is not a thread about which kind of spark plugs to use. I've seen many threads on that already. My only question/concern is how do you take them out? Or what is the best way? I tried once and tore a boot and dealership states GM has a tool made for the removal of the ignition coil strip and without that tool the boots tear. Luckily I have a good relationship with my dealership so they took care of it for me but now I have a box of plugs I bought just sitting around.

Any suggestions would greatly be appreciated! !

Thanks all.
 

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Coil pack is shown as an assembly, four boots just slip on the lower part of coil pack, each one has a spring on the inside. Typical for the boots to bake onto the spark plugs, but should pull off the coil pack, but then that spring inside may jump out.

Ounce of prevention is to coat the inside of the boots with dielectric grease just where it contacts the spark plug. If there is a special tool for this, would like to see one. Did make my own tool for boots with wires on it, 5/8" flat steel with a U cut in the end of it bend at a 90* angle. So I can get under the boot and compress it to get it off.

Sell pliers for this, but worthless, like a Chinese finger puzzle, when pulling on the outside of the boot, it grabs the plug even tighter. Have no ideal how you will get any kind of tool under that coil pack.




There is a shoulder inside of these boots where the tip of that spring can get hung up on not even contacting the plug. Stretching these springs out about 3/8" helps to prevent this.

I have yet to find those boots and springs listed separately, hate to have to purchase a whole new coil pack just because of a boot or spring.

Anyone on this board find a source for just the boots and the springs?
 

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I seriously doubt GM has a tool to remove the ignition rail without tearing the boots. Boots come out just fine over 99% of the time. I do agree GM needs to sell just the boots and springs.
 

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According to my research reading, the factory tool is essentially two screwdriver handles with threaded rod on them. After removing the two bolts holding down the coilpack. The user is to thread these two rods into the location where the bolts are located on the coil pack then lift straight up. From what I read, there must be threads in the holes of the coil pack to engage this threaded rod type tool.

This is for applying upward pressure to both sides of the coil evenly. I imagine someone tried removing it by not pulling it straight up, and this was the solution.

Here's a creative detective mission for the next person that has a coil pack off.

Are there indeed threads in these holes? Guessing the threads are metric, can we figure out the size and make some "cruzetalk" pulling rods?

Nick- I'm looking for you to have a good detective report! :)
 
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I always pull my rail straight up - no tool needed - just a little practice.
 

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Ha, under strict doctors orders not to do anything, just had surgery, but about ready to go insane.

Is a red tab on the coil connector that has to be pulled out to disconnect that connector, not really necessary, but I like to remove it anyway first because the wires to it are very fine and don't want to risk breaking any of those wires.

If the boots are baked on and if there are threads of a larger diameter in those two coil pack screw holes, pulling it straight up would break the boots anyway. I have no problems with my two hands to pull it straight up. But then I greased the inside of the boots with silicone dielectric grease from day one. Those boots are really needed to guide the springs inside.

For all I know, a piece of 5/8" heater hose could serve as a boot and the springs may be soldered to the coil pack so they don't fall out. But been using dielectric grease on boots for over 60 years now, and never had problems. Ha, always had dielectric grease, needed that for the distributor cam where the points rode on.

Just out of habit, use my air compressor to blow out the spark plug wells before removing the plugs. Should have a 5/8" spark plug socket, does have a rubber boot on the inside, need about a 9" extension, kind of a deep hole. And you do not want to drop anything in that hole.

Darn near got kicked off this board because I put a very thin like painted on anti-seize on the threads, so as soon as I break them loose, can spin them out rubbing my hands on the extension in a counter clockwise fashion. Installing them is the opposite, use the boot inside of the socket to hold the plug, center it, and very carefully thread it in. Sure don't want to cross thread it, and must be started with a delicate hand, not a good idea to use a 560 ft-lb impact wrench.

Spin the extension until the plug is seated, then use in inch ounce torque wrench, 18 ft-lbs of torque or 216 inch-oz.

Look at the bottom of the coil pack to make sure all four springs are extended, can angle the top of the coil pack toward you to make sure all four boots are going over the plugs, and while pushing it downward and forward until veritcal, push it straight down. Good to have those two coil screws handy.

Changing the plugs on the Cruze is a fun project.
 

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If the boots are baked on and if there are threads of a larger diameter in those two coil pack screw holes, pulling it straight up would break the boots anyway. I have no problems with my two hands to pull it straight up. But then I greased the inside of the boots with silicone dielectric grease from day one. Those boots are really needed to guide the springs inside.
The boots also prevent the shorting to the metal walls. We've had a couple of members try using a ripped or torn boot and they discovered a ripped or torn boot is just as bad as no boot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah I have dielectric in my garage but was unable to use it since a boot tore off. I asked the mechanic if they lubricate them in any way and he said no. Another reason why they can be hard to pull off? I think so... so until I know of a way to not tear a boot during removal, or the boots can be bought separately, I will stay clear
 

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This is what the other guys are using for the same function, coil on plug. Fits directly over the electrode on the spark plug. Has a low voltage input to a two pin connector. Almost willing to bet they would work in the Cruze but would need to add a metal strip of a single bolt to hold all four down. Run around 25 bucks each.



This is the connector view for the Cruze coil pack, but some minor testing would have to be done to verify compliance.



Can't you repair a torn boot with Scotch #33 electrical tape, dab of glue keeps it from coming loose. Or are you suppose to trade your Cruze in for a new one?

Ha, always fooling around making my own parts in my little machine shop, its easy to buy a new vehicle, but its that little stuff, like springs, boots, some special kind of screw that kills you. Looking for a carburetor jet of the right size? Good luck, but easy to make if you have the tools.
 
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