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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right, so I searched this topic prior to posting this, and didn't find the information I was looking for.


My 2012 Cruze, with 1.4L turbo, is at 98k, and I recently acquired the service history. It looks like the plugs haven't been done yet, and I was rooting around in the service information and the owner's manual, found that the original interval was 97,500. Also saw, somewhere on this forum, that GM revised it to 60k at some point or another. What I was wondering, though, is if anyone's had a problem with these things 'mating' with the head and becoming a broken plug head waiting to happen - I intend to perform this service myself. I would like to be prepared, and know what to expect, since I've never done a tune up on a Cruze before.
 

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What I was wondering, though, is if anyone's had a problem with these things 'mating' with the head and becoming a broken plug head waiting to happen - I intend to perform this service myself. I would like to be prepared, and know what to expect, since I've never done a tune up on a Cruze before.
60K is good.

Nope. Just SLOWLY wiggle the coil pack off from both ends - try to pull up slowly and simultaneously from left and right sides. Sometimes the boots break off if they've never been touched and you move it around too much.

Make sure the springs are straight in the boots before re-inserting.

Gap new plugs to .028" (or make sure they are).
 

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Yup, careful removing the coil pack, boot can attach itself to the old plugs and rip off. Upon reinstall, use dielectric (silicone) grease on the boots and new plugs to prevent future issues. Use the dielectric grease on the coil pack electrical connector, and really every other electrical connector you touch down the road, except O2 sensor connectors will fail it, everything else is good. Get a little grease on the electrical pins AND the rubber gasket around it or purposefully be sloppy on the edge so the grease will get onto the oring when plugged in.

Silicone greases are very compatible with all types of rubbers (o-rings, gaskets), except silicone itself, so use it as a o-ring lubricant as you see fit. I love silicone grease, operating temperature range -40 to 400F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm a certified professional in the auto industry, being aware of what could go wrong was certainly a bonus. I'm also glad to know the plugs don't weld themselves to the head. I got around to the tune up today, along with the manual trans fluid change. It was also the first time I've had the car in the air myself, and could give it the going over with my own eyes. (The only eyes I trust). Really dry underneath, was impressed. The car got brand new brakes before my purchase at some point too.

I can't help but feel like I wasted $50, though. After removing the plugs, I gave them a pretty good health inspection, and determined that the plugs were not end of life. In fact, they look like they were done in the 60-70k range. The fluid in the manual transmission also wasn't totally ruined. In fact, it smelled the same, and had the same color to it as the Amsoil Synchromesh I put in it. I also found a certificate in the owner's manual for lifetime alignments at Firestone - Guess I know where the car was serviced, and why I couldn't find anything in the history.

Overall, the car does shift smoother, though. Also, there was a barely audible whine in 6th gear pre trans fluid change, that is no longer there. I'm assuming it had 2 quarts of Amsoil in it at this point.
 
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