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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2014 cruze diesel, I broke off a front wheel stud while hand torqueing my wheels to 100 ft/lbs (mystery) anyway, I found the thread on grinding the back of the new stud to slide it in without the bearing removal. I haven't tried this yet as I had to order one, but I was wondering since the diesel has a different hub, if that technique still works, and if not, what are the torque specs, and/ or procedures for the hub nut, the three bolts for the bearing, and the brake caliper mounts (slide pins and mounts would be nice for future ref) I cant find anything online other than for the gas jobs. a repair manual would be nice. I know a lot of people think they can just skip the torque wrench, but I'm assuming that's how I'm in this predicament in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I finally found the GM factory repair manuals in a 5 volume set covering 1.4, 1.8, and diesel models for $305. I'm just going to go that route.
 

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Its not hard to remove. Just take the caliper, bracket and rotor off. On the backside there should be 4 bolts. Take them out and the hub assy comes off. Knock out your old stud and use either a stud puller or an old lug nut and 3 appropriate size washers. Pull the stud through by using the lug nut and install tools buy tightning with a long wrench and a pry bar between 2 studs(put lug nuts on these as not to damage threads with pry bar) and pull stud in until its all the way in contact with the backside on the hub. Re install the hub, rotor, bracket, brake caliper and wheel. Torque to 100 ft/lbs. Have a beer lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Its not hard to remove. Just take the caliper, bracket and rotor off. On the backside there should be 4 bolts. Take them out and the hub assy comes off. Knock out your old stud and use either a stud puller or an old lug nut and 3 appropriate size washers. Pull the stud through by using the lug nut and install tools buy tightning with a long wrench and a pry bar between 2 studs(put lug nuts on these as not to damage threads with pry bar) and pull stud in until its all the way in contact with the backside on the hub. Re install the hub, rotor, bracket, brake caliper and wheel. Torque to 100 ft/lbs. Have a beer lol.
no problem with changing parts, I just wanted the torque specs other than the lug nuts which I mentioned at 100. some bearings have a torque sequence, not just "tighten" lol, Like I said, I found a repair manual with everything I need, thanks anyway
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you are breaking studs there is likely grease/oil on the threads or conical area of the nut/wheel.

The 100ft.lb. spec. is specific to dry/clean (not oiled) components.......

Rob
dealer rotated tires a while back, when I got home I checked lugs as you are supposed to with aluminum wheels, anyway I found at least half were about a full turn loose, and others didn't budge with the torque wrench, but looking back were probably overtightened, the random torque lead me to believe the dealer just used an impact gun. I wanted them to fix the stud, then I'm afraid they will impact all the components necessary to replace the stud so I planned on just fixing it myself
 

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I understand your unwillingness to go back to the dealer but that mindset causes a problem.

By not returning, the folks in the service department remain unaware there is a 'mechanic' in the house doing a horseshit job.....not just to your car, but to every car that individual touches.
That means there are likely many cars leaving that dealer in substandard condition.

By not returning, or not alerting, all parties at the service end, they are unaware there is a 'hack' in the house and the substandard service will be performed on other vehicles.
You, wisely, checked......the majority will not and may loose a wheel going down the road.....your info could keep a disaster from occuring.

Personaly, I have no problem with the use of a 'Torque Stick' of the correct rating in conjunction with a impact wrench for wheel installation, but tightening lug nuts just by feel based on 'I've been doing this for years' doesn't cut it.

Thinking out loud,
Rob
 

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I hit mine with a 1/2 inch snap on impact wrench until they're not really moving after going through the sequences :) Probably over-tight but has never come loose or caused any issues for me. There's a certain feel to it when it comes to tightening anything IMO. I've never been a torque wrench everything kinda guy unless it's something really important to have 100% perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I got my new stud and all I had to do was grind off the rotor cover a little bit and it slid right in. I didn't have to remove the bearing or grind down the head of the stud
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
holy ^*++!<?, I put it back together and broke another one with a different torque wrench at 100 ft lbs. I even went to every other wheel and all are still good, I know I'm not over torquing, f this dealer, they can fix it this time. What a joke that a dealer can't get something as simple, yet as important as lug nut basics down
 
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