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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the first thing I noticed upon delivery of my vehicle and after they did their "Detailing" when you purchase a new car, was already the dreaded Swirl Marks.. Is there a way to help get some of these out and prevent them?

I have been looking through and see that a 70/30 microfiber towel is best for drying the car and I will most likely just use the high pressure car wash and do it touch less, as it works well and that way I won't have to wash it and make any more..

What can prevent these marks if I hand wash it and what would be the best wax to use on the car? I have the autumn metallic color on the ECO.
 

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To prevent swirl marks, ALWAYS wash, and wax using long strokes. NEVER go in cirlces and never use those orbiting machines, ugh. I've never had swirl marks on any of my cars even after years of use due to using this technique. As far as pre-exisiting swirls, get a high quality polish and use the long strokes to hopefully fill in the swirl marks and you should be ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To prevent swirl marks, ALWAYS wash, and wax using long strokes. NEVER go in cirlces and never use those orbiting machines, ugh. I've never had swirl marks on any of my cars even after years of use due to using this technique. As far as pre-exisiting swirls, get a high quality polish and use the long strokes to hopefully fill in the swirl marks and you should be ok.
Which wax and polish would you suggest is best?
 

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Swirl marks are ONLY caused by large polishers DeWalt 849 Variable Speed Circular Polisher: A heavy duty circular polisher for professional scratch and swirl removal. after polishing a car you need to use a Dual action orbital polisher Dual Action Orbital Polishers and pads: Porter Cable 7424 : Porter Cable 7424XP: Lake Country Buffing Foam Pads to finish the job to remove the swirl marks
Swirl marks are just the result of the polishing process which is basically, just the compound you are using scratching the surface of the paint (the finer the compound, the finer the scratches), with a large 10" buffer the swirls are large and sunlight will follow the swirls, to minimize this effect follow with the small 5" orbital, this still leaves "fine scratches" but since the path is random sunlight does not follow long sweeping swirl lines, minimizing the effect of swirls.
Having owned only black cars ( except for the Cruze) for the past 30 yrs I do have some experience,

Stuart
 

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All the above are really good ideas, but preventing swirl marks is step one. To reduce them, washing the car properly (and waxing it properly as per chuck5330's post above) is the easiest way to reduce causing them. I use three wash buckets. When the microfiber wash mitt is taken off the car (and washing the car doesn't ever involve any pressure on the paint (just patience and giving the car soap an opportunity to soak in and loosen the dirt first -- and of course never in sun as everyone knows), the mitt goes into my first hot-water only filled bucket. It gets swirled around, never touching the bottom of the bucket, then into the second bucket (which also just has warm water), again swirled around -- again not touching the bottom, then it goes into the third bucket which is the only one which has car soap in it. When you are all done, the key is to dry the car using as little pressure on the paint to get the water off as is possible, using microfiber or especially soft cloths with no fabric softener in their washing. When you are all done with drying the (and using a high pressure air hose is a good way to first get off the majority of the water off the car), and you empty the bucket you will find a lot of dirt at the bottom of the first bucket, a small to medium amount in the second bucket and almost no dirt in the bottom of your wash bucket. That way when you bring the soapy microfiber mitt back to the car, you will have removed 90% + of the dirt you would have brought back to the car if you'd only used one bucket, or even two.

Had a black '56 Chevy show car and after years of driving it and showing, never had any swirls mark on it (never polished it either).

Yes, lot of time and work to wash a car this way, but worth it on a dark car. Of course the lighter the color of the car, the less chance for swirl marks...
 

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So the first thing I noticed upon delivery of my vehicle and after they did their "Detailing" when you purchase a new car, was already the dreaded Swirl Marks.. Is there a way to help get some of these out and prevent them?

I have been looking through and see that a 70/30 microfiber towel is best for drying the car and I will most likely just use the high pressure car wash and do it touch less, as it works well and that way I won't have to wash it and make any more..

What can prevent these marks if I hand wash it and what would be the best wax to use on the car? I have the autumn metallic color on the ECO.
Check out this regional detailing forum HERE. You may need to register to see forum. Most of the detailing shops or mobile detailers on this site polish the paint the PROPER way. Your local car wash/detail shops do not. Depending on the severity of the swirls an exterior only detail could run $200-$400. BUT the swirls will be removed completely and your paint finish will end up looking better than showroom condition.

To maintain a swirl free finish you must first purchase the correct wash tools and apply the correct method. For starters try this:

1. Wash Mitt - good quality soft wash mitt can be bought HERE. Another good brand that you can find locally is Viking and its sold at Sears or O'reilys. Found HERE.

2. Car Wash Shampoo - you can not go wrong with Meguiars. They are one of the best and can be found just about anywhere locally. Plus its affordable. Use the Gold Class wash. Its high lubricity is wonderful and does a fantastic job cleaning. Found cheapest at Walmart found HERE.

3. Buckets and Grit Guards - The two bucket method is most commonly used and for good reason -- it eliminates the risk for dirt particle contamination on your wash mitt to be transferred back on to your paint surface causing micro scratches. Buckets HERE and Grit Guards HERE.

4. Drying - you want a material like microfiber for softness and a waffle weave pattern to absorb a lot of water. A very popular towel is the Cobra Guzzler found HERE.


Now that you have the tools. Lets make sure you've got the method down. Check out the videos below.



 
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