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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
Looking at doing the timing belt on my wifes 2.0l Diesel cruze over the Christmas break and have a couple of questions..
I have the belt,tensioner already. What else should I be changing at the same time? (water pump etc?)
Looking at this guide How to Replace timing belt on Chevrolet Cruze 2.0 CDI 2009- It lists 5 special tools needed for the job. Are they all really needed?
That's about it.
Thanks!!
 

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The newer diesel may be different. Nobody on here has actually changed a timing belt yet. We have one member named diesel who has like 147k miles on his and he's going to change his around 150k miles
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a 2010 model. Didn't realise there was a newer version. Better check I bought the right belt!
Scheduled change here in Australia is 90000kms (56000miles?)
 

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Sorry, I'm using the app, it doesn't let me see locations. Most of the people on here are in north America.
 

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Didn't know the diesel was using a timing belt, belt, tensioner, and pulley come to over 200 bucks. Price of diesel fuel around here is 40% greater, kind of two negatives plus DEF not to switch to diesel.

Yet the most desirable fuel for commercial use. Is this yet another case of screwing the little guy?
 

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Ha, when I first purchased a Honda, walked into their shop before work started, introduced myself and handed them a box with two dozen sweet rolls inside.

They let me borrow all the special tools I needed, not considered competition, because very few people are working on their own vehicles today.

Ha, when I first cracked open the manual for a TH-400 automatic transmission complete overhaul saw a list of special purpose tools a mile long. Met a guy my age that was overhauling these for years. You don't need all that crap, a large C-clamp and a couple of brass plates is all you need. Worked for me. But don't know until you start.

Auto Zone and others may have the tools you need, ha, doesn't hurt to ask, the the answer may kill you.
 

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Didn't know the diesel was using a timing belt, belt, tensioner, and pulley come to over 200 bucks. Price of diesel fuel around here is 40% greater, kind of two negatives plus DEF not to switch to diesel.

Yet the most desirable fuel for commercial use. Is this yet another case of screwing the little guy?
Big deal. Almost every overhead cam engine uses a belt these days and the common interval change is 100K miles. Labor is most of the cost of a timing belt change. There are dozens of reasons diesels are used for commercial purposes. Mainly because of the torque needed for hauling heavy loads, longer engine life and diesel is a more efficient fuel over gasoline. As for the cost, it just must be in your area. I pay $2.19 a gallon. DEF fluid is required in nearly every newer diesel vehicle, including light duty pickup trucks and commercial vehicles. So I'm not sure who is getting screwed.
 

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I am finally getting my timing belt changed but not going to touch it myself since I've never done a timing belt replacement and afraid I might screw something up.
 

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I'd rather have a GM motor with a timing belt than a GM motor with a chain at this point. (Looking at you 3.6). Diesel is 2.00 in NJ, Gas is like 1.87. Diesel is still cheaper than the Premium my 22 MPG Subaru H6 used.
 

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Belts are just so annoying. Never had to change a chain on any of my gm's and that was awesome.
 

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Belts are just so annoying. Never had to change a chain on any of my gm's and that was awesome.
To have a belt on a diesel is just silly. However, it is what it is. My old Chevy Cavalier has a chain and still quiet after 278,000 miles. GM screwed the pooch on this one.
 
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To have a belt on a diesel is just silly. However, it is what it is. My old Chevy Cavalier has a chain and still quiet after 278,000 miles. GM screwed the pooch on this one.
VW has used belts on their diesels for years and continue to do so even with their new engine.

When the Gen 2 CTD hits the market, it will actually be one of the first small diesels in the U.S. to have a chain instead of a belt.
 

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TruckTrend is not too pleased with the timing belt used in the Cruze diesel either.

First Drive - 2014 Chevy Cruze Clean Turbodiesel - Diesel Power Magazine

Trying to find out if this is an interference engine or not, with an interference engine, if the belt breaks or slips, the pistons will crash into the valves and in some cases, even crack the heads. Never was a good idea.

One thing about a chain, it constantly receives clean engine oil, belt depends upon one or two very limited lubricated ball bearings where the grease dries up. My major reasons for a broken belt was not the belt itself, but these two pulleys would seize up. Also a dust shield that really does not shield from road debris, see a mess when you remove the belt cover.

One thing with even new tensioners and idler pulleys I pop off the bearing seals, should be stamped with the company of origin. Will only accept Made in the USA, Canada, or Japan, China is really crap.

There are three types of ball retainers, riveted is the best, spot welded steel is second best, plastic is pure crap. Whatever idiots started using plastic should be shot have a long torture period, sure causing us a lot of grief. Another bad joke is using a plastic idler pulley, will dump these in a hurry even if I have to make my own pulley out of steel on my machine lathe. Plastic gets very brittle with age and heat, this would break a belt in a hurry, I trust Gates Made in the USA for a timing belt.

Use to say, only use OE, but the way things are today, don't know where in the hail they are made. Over years of experience if satisfied with the bearing, clean it out and only use Wolf's High Temperature Wheel Bearing grease. This stuff last for years and never gets hard. With even some "good" bearings find some white crap inside.

The timing belt is only the beginning of problems, they added also the single drive belt driving components also with limited lubricated bearings. For me, this is even more work, if that one belt breaks in some deserted area out of cell phone range in subzero weather, this can be the end of your life! Compounded by all that aluminum and plastic in these things with very low melting points. If that water pump quits turning, you really have major problems.

In the long history of automotive, these were never problems before, but sure are now. What's their solution? OnStar, and not a very good one at that, doesn't work at law on tree lined roads we deal with.

Not too concerned on these issues with my 88 Supra or 82 454 CID motorhome, both have three belts. I really got teed off at GM with their air compressor idler pulleys, were using a retainer ring to hold in that bearing ring, but then started peening it in to save a half a cent. When cast iron ages, gets rock hard and can't even peen in a new bearing, it chips off! So had to drill four holes and used countersunk flat head screw to hold it in. Then the a$$holes used an interference fit for the clutch plate, another really stupid idea, where others were using shims for the proper spacing. That compressor shaft really has to be rusty so that interference fit would hold. Maintaining the proper gap was another newly created problem.

Like I am saying what never use to be problems before are sure problems now. Planning soon on checking all those limited lubricated bearing on the Cruze, more problems that were never problems before. Money will never replace my family.
 

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I'd rather have a GM motor with a timing belt than a GM motor with a chain at this point. (Looking at you 3.6). Diesel is 2.00 in NJ, Gas is like 1.87. Diesel is still cheaper than the Premium my 22 MPG Subaru H6 used.
LOL I think the 3100/3400 guys changed chains but they were things you should do on a full rebuild anyways. 1.4 chains seem to be holding up.

For my other car, the belt job usually includes pulleys, tentioner, and water pump.
 
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