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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I purchased my 2.0L Diesel in February of 2014. 1 year and 36,000 miles later the timing belt tensioner seized up. The friction created caused the tensioner pulley to melt/break off as well. yes part of the tensioner is actually now missing. The timing belt then began to sheer as it was slipping off the gears and rubbing up against the timing cover. The waterpump also had a small leak. This is completely covered by the powertrain warranty, however my question is what are my options as a consumer. This could potentially cause major internal component damage to the engine as this is an interference engine. I particularly do not want a "rebuilt" engine only 1 year into my purchase. Could i demand a new engine be installed, could i demand to return the vehicle, should i demand some form of extended warranty? What are my options, any advice out there?
 

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You'll have to wait to see what GM comes back with and work it out with them. Most likely all the valves are bent, replacing the valve train is not a big deal. Not sure what if any damage could of occurred to the pistons. Maybe rebuild the head and have GM extend the warranty on the engine out to 150K??
 

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What's worse is to have a tensioner pulley seized up in an interference timing belt engine. Always a coupe of valves opened, and the pistons will crash into them, worse case is a cracked head or heads or a broken piston. Don't ask me why, the Japanese got by with this for years. GM always used a timing chain, but don't ask me about the LS 1.8 L, no thanks.

Not so serious is a seized bearing in another "new" idea, the single belt. Have these limited lubricated ball bearings in the alternator, AC compressor idler pulley, tensioner and idler pulleys. Any one can seize at any time and break the belt. Major cause is losing the water pump. GM Eco 2.2L drove the water pump off the timing chain, now back to the belt.

These bearings all need a cage to space the balls, best is a hardened steel two piece cage that is riveted together, not so good is spot welding the two cage halves together, really bad and totally stupid is using a plastic cage. With heat, plastic will melt and seized the balls. Wouldn't mind meeting the people that came up with this in a dark alley.

If the engine is shut off with a broken belt, need a tow job, but can be repaired like new, but is allowed to overheat, major problems can result.

Hate it when a salesperson tells me, you only have one belt to replace, dumbest thing I ever heard of, but they all are this way today. Typically, all these bearings should be replaced at around 80K miles, but don't see that in suggested maintenance.

A seized bearing is not much different from an ignition switch that doesn't stay closed, time for a major recall on all vehicles using a single drive belt system. They use to think about things like this with multiple belts.
 

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If your timing belt lost position while running there definitely will be bent valves at the least, and possibly damaged pistons as well. Keep on top of the repairs and find out if you are getting a complete new engine or if they are rebuilding yours, or just replacing the head. If they rebuild/repair the engine instead of replacing it I would definitely demand an extended engine warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update: GM is replacing the engine brand new. Valves definitely smacked around with the pistons causing the rockers to crack in half. I was able to get in touch with the GM corporate offices, initially they stated they would warranty the engine for 75,000 miles on top of current mileage. However, me knowing the extent of the repair could not agree to this. I voiced my concerns as replacing the engine entails complete dismantling of the car. The GM corporate lady stated she would request comprehensive coverage at the same terms as the component (engine) coverage. I then received confirmation of the comprehensive coverage approval. I thought, wow GM is great they're standing behind their product and workmanship. Awesome, this is a satisfactory solution. Next thing you know the paperwork/terms of the comprehensive coverage changed. GM Executive offices have lied to me and reduced the mileage to 30,000. I spoke with the executive offices about this change in terms earlier this week and they're "supposed to get back to me tomorrow with potential options". 2 days have passed, i have yet to hear from them. Right now GM has left a very sour taste in my mouth.
 

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Well at least they are replacing the whole engine, Chevy dealer was offering a $5,000.00 rebate on the Diesel last year, was tempted, but this timing belt thing turned me off.

Would be interesting to learn what type of cage was used in your old tensioner ball bearing plus the one used in the idler. If it is plastic, someone at GM should note, saving a couple of cents cost them a brand new engine plus labor.

For years, GM was against timing belts, now finding them in the LS and the Diesel, better hire a different engineering manager. Or at least double his paycheck and make him stay home. This would save GM a lot of money letting this guy go to work.
 

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G.M. first used timing belts in 1966 on the O.H.C. Pontiac inline six......later, the Vega (one of the few parts that didn't fail).

And, most of their captive imports were belt driven (ie, Sprint, Metro, Tracker (Suzuki) as well as the Prism (Toyota).

So, Nick.....why do you say G.M. was against belts? I think the Pontiac was actually the first auto to use this arrangement....well before the imports were even O.H.C.

Rob
 

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Well since they spent millions developing a quiet timing chain. Least they said they did. Another advantage of the chain, is it is constantly lubricated. Most belts are exposed to the environment and with very limited lubricated ball bearings.

Also an expense for the user, Toyota wanted 2,700 bucks to replace the timing belt in my Surpa, not that I would let them touch it, was just curious.

Was a major job, had to kick my Cruze out of my garage, needed that other stall to place all the parts I had to remove. Was suppose to be done at 60K miles but replaced it 50K. Good thing too as that tensional and idle pulley bearing were very stiff. Interference engine. Belt was in good shape but got a brand new one anyway.
 

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I've replaced 2 snapped timing belts before.
1 in a SRT4 no bent valves.
1 in my 11.1:1 comp. Honda motor. it jumped 5 teeth on me one day due to the auto tensioner taking a ****. The next week it decided to snap... no bent valves at all.
Confirmed with a compression tester.
Had a lucky horseshoe up my ass.
 
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