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Tips and Tricks for Gen1 Cruze Turbo Replacement

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Tips and Tricks for Gen1 Cruze Turbo Replacement

Overview:
I didn't get enough pictures to make a complete tutorial for this one, but I'll try to walk you through the process, and focus instead on the difficult parts. I've had people tell me this was a pretty difficult job, but I didn't find that to be the case once you figure out a few key aspects. I recommend having a means of alternate transportation available in case you need to run to the hardware store for anything.


Tools Required
- 17mm wrench
- E-socket set
- Metric hex bit set
- Metric socket set
- Torx bit set
- Flathead screwdriver
- Pliers
- Flex extensions (Available on Amazon.com)
- lb-in and lb-ft torque wrenches


Parts Required:
- 2 gallons of 50/50 coolant mix (or 1 gallon 100% with 1 gallon distilled water to mix yourself)
- Shallow bucket/pan
- Turbo gasket (Available on Amazon.com)
- Turbo oil return pipe (Available on Amazon.com)
- Turbo oil feed line (Available on Amazon.com)
- 8 Exhaust manifold nuts (Available in a pack on Amazon.com)

Note: you technically only need to replace the seals on the turbo oil return pipe and the turbo oil feed line, but with the return pipe being brittle and breaking easily, and the feed line having o-rings that do the same, and the price being not much more to just get entire new kits, it's better to just replace them altogether.


Procedure:
Always remove the negative battery terminal when working on your car.

1. Start by removing the downpipe. That's the exhaust pipe containing the catalytic converter that comes right off the turbo. Use some penetrating oil if you need to. The downpipe bolts won't come off easily so use some heat if you need to. There's a hidden bracket bolt as well in front of the oil pan that you need to remove, and a bracket it is connected to. Remove this bracket as well! If you don't remove it, you won't have enough clearance to get the coolant lines off.

2. Remove the heat shield on the turbo and the turbo oil feed line as explained in this tutorial: https://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/129...s/118210-how-replace-turbo-oil-feed-line.html. Also remove the anchors for the bolts that hold the heat shield on.

3. Remove the wastegate actuator. You'll need this off to get access to the copper nuts.

4. Remove the intake, and disconnect the bypass valve.

5. The turbo is being held on by a series of copper nuts. These are one-time use. The most difficult one to get to will be the lower passenger side bolt. I have a trick for this. Use a socket on a flex extension to get to it. If you decided not to buy the flex extensions, you're going to hate life for about 15 minutes trying to get that one nut off. Remove all copper nuts except the one on the top right, leaving it barely threaded on, so the turbo doesn't fall off. Should look like this (but with the wastegate actuator off)


6. Drain the coolant, following this tutorial: https://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/129...2011-2016-cruze-antifreeze-coolant-flush.html

7. Next, get underneath the car, and you should have a clear view of the turbo. First, remove the turbo oil return line. Disconnect it from the turbo first. On the engine block side, it simply lifts out.

8. Using the 17mm wrench, take your time to loosen and disconnect the coolant lines, starting with the bottom one, then going to the top. Note, even though you drained the coolant from the system already, you'll still lose quite a bit of coolant in this step, so be prepared for the waterfall. This is a departure from the GM procedure which has you removing the coolant lines from the block, not the turbo. You'll be glad you separated the turbo from the engine block at this point as you'll have much more clearance to work under there.

9. Once the cooler lines are off, you can remove the turbo from the engine bay.

10. Put everything back together in reverse order. Torque specs are as follows:

- Turbo copper nuts: 71 lb-in. See attachment for tightening sequence.
- Turbo oil return line: 71 lb-in
- Turbo banjo bolt: 15 lb-ft
- Turbo feed pipe retaining bolt: 71 lb-in

Attachments

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· Administrator
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
no need to replace the coolant tube or at least the seals?
I didn't on mine and it hasn't leaked. Wouldn't hurt to replace the seals though if you already have it that far apart. The coolant tube going toward the driver's side should probably be replaced as I've been seeing some reports of them leaking recently.
 

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Step 8, removing the coolant lines from the turbo. Is this from under the car or working from the top? By the time your at point #8 the turbo is essentially loose, and your pulling it away from the block to access the coolant connections?

If I recall a Youtube video by a person with the handle Ruva (Search "Cruze Turbo Oil drain line" I think you'll find it. ) it seems like it's a big challenge removing one of the 17mm coolant bolts on the left side of the exhaust manifold from the block. Guessing with your trick your leaving that line in until the turbo is out.

Good tips.
 

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Do you have a picture or link for this? - new to me: - E-socket set
I have a lisle set of E-Torx and while I like them, the E10 which is very common under the engine bay is 3/8" drive. If I were to consider buying these again, I'd look for the smaller sizes in 1/4" drive. I think you'd have better luck working with them. Specifically around the thermostat housing.

I think I saw them at Harbor Freight. You might want to look them over for quality. I'm not sure if you could screw up this type of socket or not. I've seen some video's where people have used a standard socket that fits. While it works, it does appear to round the fastener. Probably ok for the first time, but if you have to go back and do it again latter it might be nice to have full fasteners.

The water pump is all E-Torx, exhaust manifold cover, and oil pan. I think it's a European thing, from this being an Opel Engine. I've seen these on several Euro BMW engine bays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Step 8, removing the coolant lines from the turbo. Is this from under the car or working from the top? By the time your at point #8 the turbo is essentially loose, and your pulling it away from the block to access the coolant connections?

If I recall a Youtube video by a person with the handle Ruva (Search "Cruze Turbo Oil drain line" I think you'll find it. ) it seems like it's a big challenge removing one of the 17mm coolant bolts on the left side of the exhaust manifold from the block. Guessing with your trick your leaving that line in until the turbo is out.

Good tips.
Step 8 is working underneath the car with a wrench. The turbo is loose and pulled away so you can get to the coolant connections easily from underneath. Yes, leaving the lines in there until you can pull the turbo away from the head, but not remove entirely, allows you to get to them much more easily.
 

· Administrator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
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14,161 Posts
Simply put, e-sockets are inverted torx

View attachment 268081
I have a lisle set of E-Torx and while I like them, the E10 which is very common under the engine bay is 3/8" drive. If I were to consider buying these again, I'd look for the smaller sizes in 1/4" drive. I think you'd have better luck working with them. Specifically around the thermostat housing.

I think I saw them at Harbor Freight. You might want to look them over for quality. I'm not sure if you could screw up this type of socket or not. I've seen some video's where people have used a standard socket that fits. While it works, it does appear to round the fastener. Probably ok for the first time, but if you have to go back and do it again latter it might be nice to have full fasteners.

The water pump is all E-Torx, exhaust manifold cover, and oil pan. I think it's a European thing, from this being an Opel Engine. I've seen these on several Euro BMW engine bays.

Thats funny. I already had these and purchased both sets (Torx and E-type) from Harbor Freight. I just called them Torx bit sockets and Torx sockets.

Learn sumpin' new ever' day!

EDIT:
After re-reading Carbon02's post it occured to me that E-Torx might mean External Torx or as Mechguy78 put it - inverted.
 

· Administrator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
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14,161 Posts
Anybody know where to get an OE replacement turbo? All the GM sources online show it as "discontinued". Looking for a 2011 ECO.

Garrett P/N: 781504-5013S
 

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I found it easier to remove the lower turbo coolant line from the turbo but leave the top one attached and just take off the hose clamp. First turbo took me a couple of days, second one a couple of hours!
 

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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
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I found it easier to remove the lower turbo coolant line from the turbo but leave the top one attached and just take off the hose clamp. First turbo took me a couple of days, second one a couple of hours!
Did you video it?
 

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2012 Cruze Eco
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54 Posts
Check Amazon.
Also Extreme I found when I did mine that a lithium ion battery operated socket wrench was very helpful.
Is this one any good?
 

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Any updates to this? How about replacing anything else while it's this far apart? I see something mentioned about some coolant lines? Would like to have as many parts ready to go as possible when I start this.





 
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