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Tips for storing my baby for winter?

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I'm planning on storing my cruze in the garage this winter because I also have a truck to drive. This will be my first time storing a car for a long period of time and I'm looking for any pointers you guys have. Here's some stuff I have concern about:

-Mice. Should I set traps inside, or is it better not to give them a reason to come in?

-Tires. Would it be a good idea to set it on stands to avoid flat spots?

-To periodically start/drive, or not to?

I will be removing the battery to keep inside, using fuel stabilizer, putting on a fresh coat of wax, and using a car cover.

Any insight/past experiences would be appreciated.

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Another item that isn't specifically related to the actual storage, if you do start the car periodically or when at the end of the storage period the engine oil will likely be fully drained and there might not be much oil film on the bearings. On nearly all newer cars you can press and hold the accelerator pedal to the floor (i.e. wide-open throttle) and the computer will interpret this as you trying to clear an engine "flooded" with fuel. It will crank with the throttle pedal fully down but won't start until you release the pedal.

If you have a strong battery (e.g. kept a trickle charger on the battery or fully charged it before starting), you can do this for about 10 seconds, stop, let the starter motor cool off for about 20-30 second and repeat a second time. This will help build oil pressure to things like the turbo, valvetrain and variable cam timing, hydraulic timing chain tensioners, etc. On cars with canister (can) type oil filters, not the cartridge type filters on the newer GMs, you can also do this to pre-fill an empty oil filter after an oil change before the first start.
Ive heard this before, while im not too m2chanically inclined I'm curious to the logic of this, I store my 2011 cruze 1.4T from November to march every year and do a fresh oil change in march

My question is what benefit does this provide? I'm just curious.

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Better to change the oil before you store it. Better not to have dirty oil that may have harsh contaminants like acids, soaking the internal parts for 5 months.
My concern was the oil is only good for so long, I use mobile 1 full synthetic, I put less than 3k miles a year, maybe should I do a cheap oil change to store it then a good oil change when taking it out? Or should I not worry about aging of the oil

as is it gets 1 oil change a year, I can just as easily do that change in November instead of march, thanks for the advice

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If you leave a car sitting for extended periods of times, such as multiple months, all the oil will drain back to the pan. There's usually anti-drain back valves either in the oil filter or built into the oiling system or cars with cartridge filters that holds oil in the oil passages, so when you crank and start the engine the rotating parts and other oil pressure driven components get pressurized faster.

If you start an engine that has been sitting it could be multiple seconds before everything receives oil pressure, possibly longer if it is cold and the oil is thicker and doesn't flow well. That could increase the chance of metal-on-metal wear. Cranking the engine to build oil pressure without letting it start ensures the possibly dry bearings receive oil, the turbocharger center section and bearings are oiled, the oil pressure-driven variable cam timing and timing chain tensioners are pressurized, etc.

You're probably not going to experience any oil related failures and it won't kill your engine to crank and immediately start if it's been sitting but my personal opinion is that pre-pressurizing may help and doesn't hurt.




I had a four cylidner turbocharged car running full synthetic that I drove for close to 10k miles when the oil life monitor was showing under 20% service life left (it usually saw mostly highway miles). I parked it for over six months, started it and drove another couple thousand miles when the oil life monitor showed it was due for an oil change.

At that time I did my usual used oil analysis where I sent a sample in to be tested by a national testing facility (Blackstone Labs) and paid for the extra cost TBN (total base number) that tells how much of the additive package is left and gives an estimate how much service life the oil has. The test came back showing good TBN and suggested I could have run it another 3k miles and then re-tested.

Different engines behave differently and your personal operating conditions will also have a big impact. If you mostly drive stop-and-go, short distances and the engine seldom gets up to full operating temperature (not the coolant gauge but all fluids getting up to temp, which can be about 10 minutes in average climates) you might have a lot of fuel and moisture in the oil and crankcase and it would be better to change more often based on time rather than mileage.

Nobody here can advise and tell you what's "best", but if you drive that little I'd probably do the oil change before storage and when you pull it out make sure the first couple drives are long enough (time and distance) to fully get everything up to temp. You could also have the oil tested which would give a definitive answer, although the cost of testing is probably about the same as a do-it-yourself synthetic oil change.
Thank you for all the good advice, I will start applying these suggestions to my routine tee wo weeks from now when I store the car for good this year

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