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Buying or leasing a new vehicle can be terribly stressful. This is understandable because cars and trucks are often the most expensive things people purchase after their homes.

Driving off the lot feeling like you’ve been taken advantage of is disquieting at best. You’re supposed to be riding high on a wave of endorphins after acquiring a new ride, not feel like you’ve been sent through the wringer to have every penny squeezed out of your savings. To help prevent this automotive anguish here are some car-buying tips to save aggravation, stress and probably a bit of money.

First Things First

As the old proverb goes, knowledge is power. Having some basic information handy BEFORE you walk onto the showroom floor can be extremely helpful, so do your homework.

Ric Lanning, a client advisor at University Ford and Kia in Durham, North Carolina suggests potential buyers go on the internet, but not just to window shop for cars. “A lot of the dealerships will have reviews on there,” he said. Find the stores with the best ratings and don’t be afraid to look for a highly recommended salesperson. Lanning said, “I think people need to buy from someone they trust.”

Additionally, stores with veteran salespeople that have been there for decades is often a good sign. Lanning said, “This tells me the dealership is fair.” Staff that’s well treated and makes a decent living tends to stick around.

So, you’ve found a place to shop and a good salesperson. Great! But your work isn’t finished. It’s also advisable to know what you’re looking for. Again, vehicle reviews and purchasing advice from websites like AutoGuide.com (there’s nothing wrong with a little shameless self promotion) can make your life appreciably easier. “Do your research and then there are no surprises,” said Lanning.

It’s important to compare standard features and fuel economy, pricing and safety ratings. “If all the crash dummies got killed then I wouldn’t go look at that car,” said Lanning with a chuckle. Still, you don’t always need to know exactly what you want before going to a dealer. Sales professionals should be educated in the products they’re offering.

Trust is also an important thing. “I know that’s hard for some people,” said Lanning, to have faith in a dealer. “I’m not stupid. I will help you if you allow me to.” Remember, he doesn’t get paid unless he closes the deal; it’s in his best interest to make you happy so you sign the dotted line.

Money Matters

But there’s more to being an educated consumer than knowing where to shop and what kind of vehicles to look at. Josh Lewis, a former salesman at a Mazda/Kia store in North Carolina said people should know their credit scores before setting foot inside a dealership.

Lewis also said buyers should know what they’re able to spend. During his stint in sales he said people that could afford a $30,000 car would come in and try to haggle for a model costing 50 grand or more. Naturally this is a waste of time for both parties involved.

As a sale progresses Lewis said some other big things customers should ask about are interest fees and the financial institutions the dealer is shopping. Terms and rates car vary wildly. He also said, “I recommend people try to find out some information before they go into finance.” Shopping at your own bank or credit union is a no-brainer.

On the subject of money Lewis said, “Do not, DO NOT let anyone run your credit unless there’s a deal you want to do [that day].” This can be detrimental because, “Every time they open up your credit score they’re dinging [it a few points].” If you know what your rating is he said you can just tell them and spare any unnecessary damage to your score.

Politeness Police


You catch more flies with honey than vinegar and you probably stand a good chance of getting a nice deal if you’re polite and honest with the salesperson. “Car salesmen get a bad rap and probably deservedly so,” Lanning said, adding that a lot of them are not straight with buyers. “Most of the crap about the car industry has been around for years … most people have heard the scary stories.”

But Lanning cautioned, “It’s all about attitude. I’d much rather be of assistance to someone that’s a little bit open to listen to my opinions than someone that’s going to come in and tell me how to do my job.” Figuratively speaking he said don’t show up with “your guns loaded” fixin’ for a fight.

Showing the salesperson that you’re not a complete dick or simply there to waste his time joyriding in cars can improve your odds of having an amicable relationship. “Once you establish that line of credibility they back down, you back down … It becomes less of ‘how I can take advantage’ and more of equals,” Lewis said...
For much more about this story, Tips From a Salesman on How to Buy a Car please visit AutoGuide.com.
 

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How do you tell when a salesman's lying?







































His lips are moving.
 

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How do you tell when a salesman's lying?

His lips are moving.
As a former car salesman, take my word (lol) most sales guys dont lie at least in my experience. Its more often customers hear what they wanted to hear. The best way to answer this which is a rediculous question because how do you know if anyone is lying in any situation, its simple know learn, read, study your car before you go in to the dealership so that you know what trim levels and packages have. Also check the car if you have a question for instance does this car have 5 way power seats or remote start or whatever check the car it is on the maroni sticker! The only thing about checking is to often sales guys are not pushing you to buy the car on their lot, IMO they should because a certain wheel option may be different than the one you drove and feel different upon delivery for example. Lets be realistic most of the time you dont know exactly what color or option you want until you get there and sometimes when you see a package together you may perfer it over what you originally wanted. When buying a new car realize that a new car salesman make an average of 35k a year and work 60+ hours a week inc holidays. Its a terrible sucky job so dont waste their time because on a mini deal they usually make $100 for at least 8hrs of test driving, negotiating, financing and getting you to come back with your wife the next day/week. The biggest problem is that dealerships will hire anyone to sell a car as long as they have a valid drivers license and no terrible criminal record. So they arent hiring car gurus or super brainiacs. I left the industry after being promoted to sales manager and I realized that all the hard work I was doing and getting punished by the customer and my managers as a sales guy is because I was a pawn their biatch. When I got promoted I than had to treat my sales guys like c.r.a.p give them no reward and be the problem, I made a crap load more but sold my soul for 3 months of my life so I left. Its a biatch of an industry and its still my opinion that it should be a law that you have to sell cars for 90 days before you can buy one just so you fully understand both sides.

Bottom line if you dont want someone to lie and get away with you on the short end of the stick make yourself smarter about the vehicle you are inquiring about so you never feel hoodwinked.
 

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As a former car salesman, take my word (lol) most sales guys dont lie at least in my experience. Its more often customers hear what they wanted to hear. The best way to answer this which is a rediculous question because how do you know if anyone is lying in any situation, its simple know learn, read, study your car before you go in to the dealership so that you know what trim levels and packages have. Also check the car if you have a question for instance does this car have 5 way power seats or remote start or whatever check the car it is on the maroni sticker! The only thing about checking is to often sales guys are not pushing you to buy the car on their lot, IMO they should because a certain wheel option may be different than the one you drove and feel different upon delivery for example. Lets be realistic most of the time you dont know exactly what color or option you want until you get there and sometimes when you see a package together you may perfer it over what you originally wanted. When buying a new car realize that a new car salesman make an average of 35k a year and work 60+ hours a week inc holidays. Its a terrible sucky job so dont waste their time because on a mini deal they usually make $100 for at least 8hrs of test driving, negotiating, financing and getting you to come back with your wife the next day/week. The biggest problem is that dealerships will hire anyone to sell a car as long as they have a valid drivers license and no terrible criminal record. So they arent hiring car gurus or super brainiacs. I left the industry after being promoted to sales manager and I realized that all the hard work I was doing and getting punished by the customer and my managers as a sales guy is because I was a pawn their biatch. When I got promoted I than had to treat my sales guys like c.r.a.p give them no reward and be the problem, I made a crap load more but sold my soul for 3 months of my life so I left. Its a biatch of an industry and its still my opinion that it should be a law that you have to sell cars for 90 days before you can buy one just so you fully understand both sides.

Bottom line if you dont want someone to lie and get away with you on the short end of the stick make yourself smarter about the vehicle you are inquiring about so you never feel hoodwinked.
One second dressing in my pj's to read this
 

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A young lady friend I knew for years got a job as a new car salesperson at out local Ford dealer. Knowing her and her knowledge of cars, had to ask her how she deals with the technical questions.

What technical questions she replied, practically all the customers she has dealt with just ask about the color options.

So there you have it, not a very well minded technical person selling cars with an equally ignorant buying public.

Ha, the number of posts on this board, what color is your Cruze? Duh!!! LOL
 

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A young lady friend I knew for years got a job as a new car salesperson at out local Ford dealer. Knowing her and her knowledge of cars, had to ask her how she deals with the technical questions.

What technical questions she replied, practically all the customers she has dealt with just ask about the color options.

So there you have it, not a very well minded technical person selling cars with an equally ignorant buying public.

Ha, the number of posts on this board, what color is your Cruze? Duh!!! LOL
I would love to get technical questions from a customer because I typically knew the answer being a big time car guy and if I didnt than I learned something. But the main reason I loved them is because it gave me a chance to qualify myself and connect with the customer like no other sales guy could do.....meaning I closed them fairly quickly
 

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Sorry I dont follow thread trends and whats cool in posting. I responded the way I though was needed to a comment. I am rarely long winded on posts especially considering others.. either way Ill do my best to break it up next time.
That's what was implied by Kermits response I personally could care less if you want to write a book or a one worded response because I'll read it either way lol. I was just responding to the ??? that you had put up.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Here is how I do it. Do your research first. Know exactly which car you want. You can search inventories on the Internet. Search a lot of dealerships. Call and make sure the exact car you want is still available (give them the VIN that is listed on the Internet) and let them know you are coming to see it. Walk into the dealership knowing exactly how much the car should cost, because you did your research. Bring a lunch with you, and something to keep you busy, like a book or a game. Sit there until they give you the fair price based on your research. It will take a while, but if it is a fair price, they will give it to you eventually. If not then go to a different dealership.

Also, only negotiate the price of the car, not monthly payments. And, separate the negotiations for the new car from your trade in. They are separate negotiations. These are tricks dealerships use to confuse you into thinking you are getting a better deal then you really are.

One more thing. Get preapproved for a loan with someone else, such as a credit union. This will help you negotiate the interest rate with the finance manager.
 

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a few salespeople been really cool people, and a few relatives and friends of mine have done sales at dealerships... even they admit the shady ones outweigh the normal ones. i tried to deal with a credit manager at a toyota dealer who wears pimp suits and snakeskin shoes, i don't care how good of a deal it is, you're not earning my trust or money looking like a prototypical shiester. he also thought he was a super slick talker, and kept trying to shake my hand. it got creepy.
the guy at the chevy dealer in the same automall joked about how that guy acts, both dealers are owned by the same guy. the chevy guys were much more normal, and i bought a car through them. i took my gf to the toyota place because she wanted to look at a used rav4, and they showed us a dirty used one that had dog piss on the inside of the back hatch. we ran away just as the shiester was walking out to greet us, same pimp suit, alligator shoes.
now the gf is looking at a trax, the experience ruined toyota for her. the salesperson makes the brand and the product, the price is just a conclusion of the experience, imo.
 

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I've walked away from two different dealerships over the years. One was for bait and switch and the other for trying to sell me a car with dealer added options I didn't want. The bait and switch dealership had the best Pontiac service department in Denver so I continued using them for service - just not new car purchases.
 
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