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my dealer uses Nitrogen so it doesnt change from cold/hot when i go in for an oil change im going to have them pump up the tires. But how high should i go? they are at 35ish on all 4. I heard someone go to 51psi??? Im afraid to go that high. I was thinking around 45psi. Not worried about ride quality, i had a 09 colbalt SS and the ride quality SUCKED.. i dont think it can get worse
 

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I'm sitting at 48psi (cold air) will reach 49-50 warm. I'm sure "xtreme" will chime in and tell you that that's perfectly fine.

you should look at his threads he's started concerning mpg and resignator delete they both mention tire pressure.

But I dought the dealer will let you pump them up that high


Sent from iPhone 4
 

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Take a guess as to what would happen if you inflated your tires to 51psi cold (max sidewall for Cruze Eco's tires).

Answer: nothing.

Take a guess as to what would happen if you inflated your tires to 51psi cold and you had a pressure related failure?

Answer: you would defy the laws of physics. Tire failure would make headline news like it did with the Ford Explorer fiasco. Pigs would fly, and I'd eat manure.

The simple fact is that tire manufacturers specify a max sidewall cold pressure with about a 200% wiggle room for liability reasons. You will not wear your tires unevenly (this is an old truth applicable only to bias-ply tires, NOT radial tires). The NHTSA proved that you do not lose a notable amount of stopping distance (about 2.2% or 3 feet in dry asphalt, no change in wet asphalt, no change in wet or dry concrete). You will gain a good amount of fuel economy, and the only compromise will be ride quality. Tires do not fail due to too high of a pressure; they fail due to too low of a pressure or the tires are old and dry rotted and should have been replaced long ago.

I have materials to back all of this up.
 

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Take a guess as to what would happen if you inflated your tires to 51psi cold (max sidewall for Cruze Eco's tires).

Answer: nothing.

Take a guess as to what would happen if you inflated your tires to 51psi cold and you had a pressure related failure?

Answer: you would defy the laws of physics. Tire failure would make headline news like it did with the Ford Explorer fiasco. Pigs would fly, and I'd eat manure.

The simple fact is that tire manufacturers specify a max sidewall cold pressure with about a 200% wiggle room for liability reasons. You will not wear your tires unevenly (this is an old truth applicable only to bias-ply tires, NOT radial tires). The NHTSA proved that you do not lose a notable amount of stopping distance (about 2.2% or 3 feet in dry asphalt, no change in wet asphalt, no change in wet or dry concrete). You will gain a good amount of fuel economy, and the only compromise will be ride quality. Tires do not fail due to too high of a pressure; they fail due to too low of a pressure or the tires are old and dry rotted and should have been replaced long ago.

I have materials to back all of this up.
I'd like to see some materials because 75% of that is BS. Overinflated tires will absolutely wear in the center more than properly inflated tires, changes in stopping distance are determined by the weight of the car and the width of the tire (what percentage is lost to the contact area due to over inflation), if you have a light car with wide tires it won't be as dramatic as a heavy car with narrower tires. The odds of a sidewall failure or loss of the tire bead with a sharp impact increase dramatically once you go above 40 PSI on most car tires. Fuel economy May go up a few points and yes it will ride harsher. It also changes the spring rate of the car and makes the vehicle more prone to unloading the suspension which can also be dangerous in certain situations. I've been in the tire business for years and would really like to know the basis of your theories. Generally it is safe to go up or down 5 PSI on your tires and not see adverse effects and the only time you should deviate from that is if you put a higher load on the tire (more weight).

For the OP, best advice is stick with the manufacturer recommendations

Edit: and yes underinflation is most definetly the worse of the two and more likely to cause a tire failure because the tire can't maintain it's shape, but that doesn't mean there are not risks with overinflation.
 

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Uh Oh now there is a war!!! However filling up to SideWall max is not Overinflating :D hehe. but i have min at 48 cold they get up to about 53 hot and driving cause i live in SoCal and its pretty hot at the moment!
 

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I have traditionally run my tires at 5 PSI above the door placard and have never had problems with uneven wear due to overinflation. Radials are resistant to tread buldges from over/under inflation, but not immune. Also, my dealer put nitrogen in and I still noticed a +- 2 PSI change in tire pressure, so I'm definitely not sold on nitrogen unless it's free.

Higher pressure in tires will reduce rolling resistance, but not in the way most people expect. Basically, the sidewall on the part of the tire pressed against the ground bulges. Higher PSI reduces this bulge. As a result less rotational energy is turned into flexing the sidewall. The side effect of this is that your ride becomes stiffer and smaller bumps in the road are transmitted to the suspension by the tire. This is useful for improving low speed MPGs because the rolling resistance is a larger component of the overall drag friction on the car. At high speeds, the rolling resistance is overwhelmed by the drag friction of the car through the air. Rolling resistance goes up as a linear multipler of speed while the air resistance goes up as the square of the speed.
 

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I'd like to see some materials because 75% of that is BS. Overinflated tires will absolutely wear in the center more than properly inflated tires, changes in stopping distance are determined by the weight of the car and the width of the tire (what percentage is lost to the contact area due to over inflation), if you have a light car with wide tires it won't be as dramatic as a heavy car with narrower tires. The odds of a sidewall failure or loss of the tire bead with a sharp impact increase dramatically once you go above 40 PSI on most car tires. Fuel economy May go up a few points and yes it will ride harsher. It also changes the spring rate of the car and makes the vehicle more prone to unloading the suspension which can also be dangerous in certain situations. I've been in the tire business for years and would really like to know the basis of your theories. Generally it is safe to go up or down 5 PSI on your tires and not see adverse effects and the only time you should deviate from that is if you put a higher load on the tire (more weight).

For the OP, best advice is stick with the manufacturer recommendations

Edit: and yes underinflation is most definetly the worse of the two and more likely to cause a tire failure because the tire can't maintain it's shape, but that doesn't mean there are not risks with overinflation.
You didn't seriously post the popularmechanics article, did you?

Lets start with the popular(stupid)mechanics link. I'll just quote myself since I already went over this one before.

I debunked that debunk back in my other thread for the airbox mod. If you follow their link to the popularmechanics magazine link, its complete, utter bullshit. Its amazing how little critical thinking ability people have.

Debunking a Mileage Myth: Can You Really "Pump Up" Your Fuel Economy? - Popular Mechanics

I'll outline it for you. In order to test a difference in fuel economy, you need to re-create the conditions identically. They failed to do this.

They took an 800 mile round trip with their Honda Fit from LA to Phoenix, AZ. Going to Phoenix, they had tires at 45psi for that trip and got 42.19mpg.

TWO DAYS LATER, not even the same day, they drove back to LA and used tire pressure at 32psi. They noted 42.14mpg.

What are the flaws here?

First of all, they went in two entirely different directions. They didn't make two round trips, they made two trips. Having driven that route before, I can tell you that there is a significant climb through a windy (as in, many turns) road in the mountains/canyons getting into Arizona. That would have reduced their fuel economy going to Arizona and increased it going back. They also didn't account for wind speed or record it to make sure there was or wasn't any. It is more than likely that there was some kind of wind and either it blew in the same direction for both drives or it changed after two days. In addition, temperature changes would have affected their fuel economy given a two day difference.

They didn't note the time of departure from either location and whether or not they hit any traffic. If you've ever driven out of LA like I have a dozen times, you'll know exactly why I make a point of this. They are also wrong in saying that the vehicle's handling is compromised; quite the contrary, it is improved due to less sidewall flex and roll. Your car becomes more responsive and predictable.

This is why I don't trust for-profit magazines to report anything accurately or correctly. Another thing: they also over-inflated the tires beyond the max sidewall rating by 1psi. Its only 1psi, but still. In all their wisdom, they should have known better.

Popularmechanics: 0
XtremeRevolution: 1
Check your sources before you post them and think more critically. Not everyone who agrees with you is correct. I'm not trying to be rude; in fact, I've learned this the hard way a few too many times.

I won't go through all of the links because:

1. for-profit magazines that get paid to say what they do
2. people who don't know jack and just go based off what the above people wrote

I do however go based off of what people actually experience. One of my biggest sources is the cleanmpg.com forums. I'll get to that later.

I have a friend who works at Firestone, and has for about 8 years now. That doesn't mean he knows a **** thing about tires. In fact, all he really knows how to do is read their brochures and install the tires as specified by his manager. Your point about working in the tire industry is, well, useless to me and useless for an argument's sake.

Tires are not overinflated if they are run at the maximum sidewall. They are run within the tire manufacturer's safe specifications, and that is a cold pressure. They are overinflated if they exceed the maximum sidewall pressure. What GM recommends is a suggestion as a best compromise. If you increase tire pressure, you will gain fuel economy but you will lose ride quality and that's a given.

It is not safe to go down 5psi from what is recommended. Did we not learn a thing from the Ford/Firestone recall? The culprit was tire failure due to too low of a pressure. What did they recommend? Somewhere between 26-28psi initially. Ford released an official statement recommending an increase to 32psi, which is a 6psi difference, but enough to reduce heat generated by a great deal of rolling resistance.

Spring rate of a car going over bumps remains marginally and insignificantly affected; that's what we have shock absorbers for. I've had my tires at 50psi for about 2 weeks now and there is a very marginal difference in how the car handles. The Cruze Eco LRR tires are stiff enough as it is. Increasing that tire pressure just makes those little bumps and road variations a little easier to feel.

With regard to wear rate, you're confusing bias-ply tires with radial tires. In fact, everyone who has "over-inflated" their tires to maximum sidewall on cleanmpg.com have an entirely different problem; its not that their tires wear unevenly, its that they wear perfectly evenly and last too long. Too long as in, they're 80k miles into their all-season tires with almost half of their tread life remaining and they have to replace them due to dry rot, not wear. Go to cleanmpg.com, go to the forums section, and search for "tire pressure." You'll get the idea after the 30th page of reading through threads. The reason for this is how our tires are designed. These are radial tires, not bias-ply tires. What's the difference? You can google this till you're blue in the face, but I'll sum it up; radial tires have a separated sidewall and tread so that when you inflate them, the tread maintains its uniformity regardless of pressure, up to a point of course, which is usually about 2x that of the maximum sidewall pressure. I'll repeat this, radial tires, when rotated will not wear unevenly regardless of tire pressure, so long as that tire pressure is kept between at least 25psi and the maximum sidewall pressure.

Why do I not trust your sources? Because it has been demonstrated repeatedly that tires last longer on both ecomodder.com and cleanmpg.com forums when they are inflated to the maximum sidewall pressure compared to the manufacturer suggested pressure. It is in the best interest of every tire maker to keep you from getting 1.5x the life out of your tires than the tires are rated for. If I ran a tire shop, it would be bad for business. Why would I want you to go 60-80k miles on your tires when I could fill them to GM's spec and have you come back in for a new set at 40-50k? Think about that for a second. How many people have actually inflated their tires to max sidewall, rotated them regularly, and come back to you and said "****, these tires didn't last me at all, I guess I should have kept the tire pressure at the manufacturer recommended spec."

Start reading critically. In your first article, the following line can be found: "
and could result in uneven tire wear." Key word there is "could," not "will certainly", not "will definitely", but "could." Why did they use "could?" Because they're not sure and because it doesn't apply to all tires. See: bias-ply vs radial.​


Since I really do get tired of repeating what I've said over and over and over again, start reading this thread from that page onward, and let me know if you have any questions. You can also find similar information in my "how to get better fuel economy" thread. Both of these can be found in my signature.

http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/57-how-forum/5479-how-bypass-intake-resonator-8.html

NHTSA tested stopping distance from 60-0. It can be concluded from this that the stopping distance is insignificantly affected (if at all) by tire pressure. You'll see that in one of 4 conditions, you have a 2.2% deviation, which, while consistent, can be written off as expected error. In either case, if we are to assume that the difference is linear, we will have a 2.2% reduction in stopping distance going from 35-50psi. In layman's terms, it will be insignificant. Increasing from 35 to 50psi is the same increase in tire pressure, but the difference in lost surface contact will be less than when going from 20-35psi.

[SIZE=+1]Table III-8[/SIZE]
Braking Distance (in feet) from NHTSA testing
Stopping Distance from 60 mph
Surface15 psi20 psi25 psi30 psi35 psi
Wet Concrete148.8147.5145.9144.3146.5
Dry Concrete142.0143.0140.5140.4139.8
Wet Asphalt158.5158.6162.6161.2158.0
Dry Asphalt144.0143.9146.5148.2144.0



The above chart proves that the following article is full of BS:
Over-inflating tires is not a gas-saving move | Consumer News | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOMO News

Who are you going to trust? NHTSA or komonews.com, an article written by a journalist? Also in the wet, you're going to skid a lot easier if you have to slam the brakes on in a panic stop." Wait, you mean thinner tires don't dig through water and prevent you from hydroplaning? What school of engineering did Herb study at? Oh, right, he's a journalist.

Moving on:

Tire Pressure - Cars.com

Your tires will not bounce on the road. They will stay planted because you have shock absorbers. Increasing your tire pressure does not cause the tire to "bounce around" as if your shocks are blown. Bad information, unless your shocks are on their way out. These are another group of people who claim your stopping distances are affected. See NHTSA testing above. You decrease contact area slightly, but you increase pressure per square inch.

Michelin tire site = biased
Good year tire site = biased

Whenever a tire manufacturer has something to gain from giving you a piece of information, they're biased. I shouldn't have to sit here and argue that in business in the US, its about the money, not about what's best for the American people. I won't count how many times this has been proven. Long gone are the days when a company will act in your best interest and not in the interest of their stock price and profit margin.

Tuffy Auto Service sells tires = biased

Moving on:

Save Money On Gas: Avoid These 12 Gas Saving Myths - Saving Advice

^ No need to repost, they clearly state their information is taken from edmunds.com.

Moving on:

Edmunds Employees Put to the Tire Pressure Test - Edmunds.com

How was this test performed? I'm not seeing any data here with regard to "over-inflation." All I see is "When a tire is overinflated, the contact patch is reduced and the center of the tire tread wears faster than the outer edges." Again radial vs bias-ply. Not the same tire. I am appalled at how many people don't realize tire technology has changed in the past 50 years.

So far, the articles you posted haven't proven anything except that people still have no clue how radial tires work and they think we're still using bias-ply tires, and that they're pulling numbers or "facts" out of thin air, perhaps from someone else's article who was equally ill-informed. Until I find evidence by an agency such as the NHTSA proving that there is a notable difference in stopping distance based on tire pressure, I'm going to keep going back to the test results I posted a few times now.
 

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Uh Oh now there is a war!!! However filling up to SideWall max is not Overinflating :D hehe. but i have min at 48 cold they get up to about 53 hot and driving cause i live in SoCal and its pretty hot at the moment!
I've fought this battle before, and right you are! Filling up to sidewall maximum is not over-inflating. 48psi cold is an excellent pressure for the Cruze Eco's stock tires. Mine are at 50psi at 78 degrees F.

I have traditionally run my tires at 5 PSI above the door placard and have never had problems with uneven wear due to overinflation. Radials are resistant to tread buldges from over/under inflation, but not immune. Also, my dealer put nitrogen in and I still noticed a +- 2 PSI change in tire pressure, so I'm definitely not sold on nitrogen unless it's free.

Higher pressure in tires will reduce rolling resistance, but not in the way most people expect. Basically, the sidewall on the part of the tire pressed against the ground bulges. Higher PSI reduces this bulge. As a result less rotational energy is turned into flexing the sidewall. The side effect of this is that your ride becomes stiffer and smaller bumps in the road are transmitted to the suspension by the tire. This is useful for improving low speed MPGs because the rolling resistance is a larger component of the overall drag friction on the car. At high speeds, the rolling resistance is overwhelmed by the drag friction of the car through the air. Rolling resistance goes up as a linear multipler of speed while the air resistance goes up as the square of the speed.
Correct, they are not immune. They still need to be rotated. Due to camber changes during cornering, your front tires will naturally wear out the edges a lot more than the centers. A car that has never had its tires rotated will inevitably have the shoulders on the front edges worn out MUCH more than the rest of the tire. The rear of the car is not exposed to this and as such will wear the insides more quickly regardless of pressure. At max sidewall pressure with the tires on my Cruze Eco, 100% of the tread is in contact with the road. Here's some more info:

Tires Explained, Biased Ply VS Radial Tires - What makes each so **** great?

The fronts will wear the shoulders, the rears will wear the centers. So long as tires are rotated, they will ear evenly regardless of pressure. The only time you will ever see a tire that's worn more in the center than on the edges is when it has not been rotated.

I'll invite everyone here to do a search for "tire pressure" on the cleanmpg.com forums as I did, and spend the countless hours as I did to read about all of the people who are significantly exceeding their treadwear rating and wearing down their tires 100% evenly while running max sidewall pressures and higher. One guy (and I don't recommend this because its a bit extreme) ran 100k miles on OEM Accord tires, running somewhere around 60-80psi. However, even if one would argue that he's an exception, everyone else who runs max sidewall pressure will tell you over and over again that their tires are wearing evenly and always have.

You hit the nail on the head with everything you said. I'd give you a beer if you were nearby.
 

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Hahaha how long did that rant take to muster up? If u want rock hard tires then buy tires with stiffer rubber like low rolling resistance tires and run them at the psi they are recommended for. .
How long? Not sure, man. Last time I took a typing test, I benchmarked 131 words per minute with 92% accuracy. It doesn't take me very long to make page-long posts.

Who said I wanted rock-hard tires? That was merely a possible consequence of increasing tire pressure to maximum sidewall. These things are always very subjective. BTW, The Cruze Eco tires are LRR tires.
 

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Just to throw this out there for curiosity what would happen to the Eco's mileage if you went with Non-LLR but inflated the pressure?
 

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Just to throw this out there for curiosity what would happen to the Eco's mileage if you went with Non-LLR but inflated the pressure?
The sidewalls wouldn't be quite as stiff, so you'd gain some rolling resistance off the bat. Many standard all-seasons also aren't rated beyond 44psi, so you wouldn't be able to get to the same pressures anyway. Off the top of my head, I think you'd realistically see around 1-2mpg difference between max sidewall all-seasons and max sidewall LRR tires.
 

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Alright then, I won't go against clean MPG forums since they are obviously more in the know than (the obviously biased) tire engineers. I fail to see how popular mechanics makes a profit off tire pressure (maybe I am wrong) but I also notice you didn't bother with what Michelin, Goodyear, the tire rack Etc had to say about it, just that they are biased. Of course they are biased, they make and sell tires and it is in their best interest to keep you safe so you buy their product and don't sue them.The fact people do it and have no issues doesn't change anything. Millions of people skydive with no issues and a few auger in and turn into pancakes. Anytime it has been scientifically tested the gain in MPG with overinflated tires is minimal compared to proper inflation. The big change is if you go down in PSI. With wear yes a bias ply will wear worse, but radial tires are not immune to ballooning and you can lose 25% or more of your tread life with too high a PSI. Bottom line the BEST tire pressure to run is the recommended tire pressure that the engineers (not clean MPG forums) figured out was best for your particular car, and if you change that without understanding what you are ACTUALLY doing, you do it at your own risk, chances are you will be just fine except for buying tires sooner, but it doesn't change the fact you are using the tire as it was not intended to be used.
 

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How long? Not sure, man. Last time I took a typing test, I benchmarked 131 words per minute with 92% accuracy. It doesn't take me very long to make page-long posts.
There I go thinking I was a beast with my 88 words per minute, 94% accuracy. LOL. I'll sit down.

I'll say there is no right or wrong answer to this. If you want MAX MPGs, you go with the maximum pressure listed on the tire. I personally go about halfway between the max and dealer recommendation. To each its own.
 

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I don 't think a lot people understand how much force you are talking about, think about it this way. Imagine 35 pounds of weight and on your hand. Now imagine 50 pounds of weight on your hand (or do it if you choose) Imagine the difference there. That is what your tire is doing in every square inch. Say (for giggles) the tire is 8 inches wide and 48 inches around.

8X48= 384 square inches
384X35PSI=13,440 pounds of pressure in that tire
384X50PSI+19,200 pounds of pressure in that tire

Starting to get it? and that is just the tread size, that same pressure is on the sidewall at the same PSI so the numbers are actually even higher than that. There is A LOT of potential energy in an inflated tire
 

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Alright then, I won't go against clean MPG forums since they are obviously more in the know than (the obviously biased) tire engineers. I fail to see how popular mechanics makes a profit off tire pressure (maybe I am wrong) but I also notice you didn't bother with what Michelin, Goodyear, the tire rack Etc had to say about it, just that they are biased. Of course they are biased, they make and sell tires and it is in their best interest to keep you safe so you buy their product and don't sue them.The fact people do it and have no issues doesn't change anything. Millions of people skydive with no issues and a few auger in and turn into pancakes. Anytime it has been scientifically tested the gain in MPG with overinflated tires is minimal compared to proper inflation. The big change is if you go down in PSI. With wear yes a bias ply will wear worse, but radial tires are not immune to ballooning and you can lose 25% or more of your tread life with too high a PSI. Bottom line the BEST tire pressure to run is the recommended tire pressure that the engineers (not clean MPG forums) figured out was best for your particular car, and if you change that without understanding what you are ACTUALLY doing, you do it at your own risk, chances are you will be just fine except for buying tires sooner, but it doesn't change the fact you are using the tire as it was not intended to be used.
Popular mechanics is not making a profit; they're just stupid, and I demonstrated why. They performed an uncontrolled experiment and didn't account for all variables. Their testing is invalid, and as a result, they're misleading people.

I don't want to be rude, but we don't live in a perfect world. We live in a world where if your clutch on your Cruze Eco fails, GM will do anything in its power to not replace it and call it a wear item. See the general section of this forum. We live in a world where Toyota has been hiding their random acceleration and sticky pedal problems since 2002, leading up to I think 11 current and open federal investigations. Money is king and you and I both know that. Any company that manufactures and sell tires will recommend want you to come back for another set, and the guys at cleanmpg.com forums have demonstrated time and time again, with no discrepancies, that your tire life is significantly extended by running maximum sidewall pressure and that the radial tires wear evenly.

Show me a single test that's actually been done by an organization that indicates you wear tires SOONER using "over-inflated" tires than with the manufacturer recommendation. You won't find it because its not true. Nobody actually tests this crap, they just tell it to you to keep you from doing it for obvious reasons. Plenty of people here know that's the honest truth and I'm surprised you still think tire manufacturers act in your best interest.

The best tire pressure to run is that which meets your needs, not that which your car's manufacturer recommended. The Cruze Eco tires are designed to run up to 51psi safely. There is absolutely NO basis in telling people that they cannot do so.

Don't bring engineers into this unless you can bring an actual engineer into this. Don't speak on their behalf as if you know exactly why they made their decisions. I can guarantee you they didn't tell us to run 35PSI on our Eco tires to maximize tire wear over higher pressures. I and everyone else here know as a fact, they did it as a best compromise for ride quality. I will admit that running tires at 50psi like I do leads to a notable increase in road variations transmitted into the vehicle. The tires simply don't absorb smaller impacts anymore.

I don 't think a lot people understand how much force you are talking about, think about it this way. Imagine 35 pounds of weight and on your hand. Now imagine 50 pounds of weight on your hand (or do it if you choose) Imagine the difference there. That is what your tire is doing in every square inch. Say (for giggles) the tire is 8 inches wide and 48 inches around.

8X48= 384 square inches
384X35PSI=13,440 pounds of pressure in that tire
384X50PSI+19,200 pounds of pressure in that tire

Starting to get it? and that is just the tread size, that same pressure is on the sidewall at the same PSI so the numbers are actually even higher than that. There is A LOT of potential energy in an inflated tire
I don't think you understand that tire manufacturers are bound by the NHTSA to post VALID numbers on the tire sidewall. Regardless of your calculations, the tire manufacture rates that tire for that specific pressure SAFELY and with at least a 200% safety margin. 51psi max on the Eco tires is a cold pressure. They know that if you inflate at 51psi at 68 degrees F, and you drive down a Las Vegas highway in the summer with 110 blazing heat that the pressure will expand, and they've accounted for that and much more for liability reasons.

What PSI do truck tires run? Just because there's potential energy, doesn't mean there's potential disaster. The real fact is that increasing pressure reduces rolling resistance, which in fact reduces heat created and reduces the variation in pressure. Reduction in heat reduces to less likelihood for a blowout and helps prolong dry rot.

I generally inflate to 110% of recommended inflation pressure. Any more than that I find the ride quality suffers too much.


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That's 100% fine. You tried it and you noticed the difference. It works for you, and neither I nor anyone else can tell you its not right. You value your ride quality, and that's great. You've found the pressure that works best for you.

I'm recommending everyone do the same as you did, and I'm telling them its safe to go to the max sidewall rating if they don't have ride quality in mind.

40-42 psi since day one and that's all I have to say about that!!!
:eusa_clap:
 

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There I go thinking I was a beast with my 88 words per minute, 94% accuracy. LOL. I'll sit down.

I'll say there is no right or wrong answer to this. If you want MAX MPGs, you go with the maximum pressure listed on the tire. I personally go about halfway between the max and dealer recommendation. To each its own.
BINGO!

This is the fundamental truth with regard to tire pressure. Stick to at least the minimum recommended by the car manufacturer, but don't exceed the maximum recommended by the tire manufacturer, measured cold for that season.

I'm not here to tell people what pressure to run. I'm just telling them what pressure they can run.

My response to the initial poster; if you want max fuel economy and don't care about ride quality, 1-2psi under max sidewall is my recommendation.
 
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