Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard of nightmares with the flush because of the chemicals used to flush it, but you get 100% fluid replacement.
I like the exchange idea better, but don't get a full exchange unless they do it a few times, from what I've read.

I plan on doing this at my Chevy dealer, since my powertrain warranty is still in effect. The schedule recommends the trans fluid replaced at 30k, and I'd really like to keep this car tip top.

Thanks in advance
Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
Only time I've ever heard of a flush causing problems is with the first change being high mileage 60k+ miles

The Sexy Electrician
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,535 Posts
G.M. has published a official stance regarding 'flushing of automatic transmissions'.

In short, is is strongly advised AGAINST.
All manufacturers have noted an unusually high rate of failure following flushing and Chrysler has gone so far as to deny a trans failure claim if it can be determined a flushing process has recently taken place.

The industry accepted method of 'Drain/Refill' still applies and the theory is along the lines of replenishing as little as 50% of the fluid provides a satisfactory 'Recharge' of detergents/friction modifiers/etc.'

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
Just to be clear, I never flush my transmissions even though I sounded like an advocate with my last post. I do the drain/fill technique and have never had a problem. I've been told to do it 3 times and it will replenish around 90% of the fluid.

The Sexy Electrician
 

·
Epic Beard Man
Joined
·
5,389 Posts
Just to be clear, I never flush my transmissions even though I sounded like an advocate with my last post. I do the drain/fill technique and have never had a problem. I've been told to do it 3 times and it will replenish around 90% of the fluid.

The Sexy Electrician
You will be surprised at how much clears out with just one drain/refill. I did two drains, and the second one, after running the car for a bit, was very red like new fluid. My factory fill stuff looked like sewer water, and not a hint of the dark color the second time around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
I did my 2009 ford escape with the 6F35 transmission. on the second drain fill it still looked like used motor oil. on the 3rd one it was once again red.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have read that a bunch of mfg recommend against it.
I am a 1.8 6A

I also am aware that it's a nightmare on high mileage (flushes).

So the drain and refill is what GM would do at the dealer, not the flush, correct? I will make sure to differentiate.
Any idea on cost?

Thanks for all the info.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
906 Posts
I am curious as to what Andrei recommends in this case.. I was under the assumption that if you take it to the dealership they will hook it up to a machine and by doing that it cycles the new fluid through all lines and coolers..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@white

I'm hoping that if (from what I read) GM discourages the flushes, and my car is still under warranty, that they wouldn't do the flush. That's just my 'thought' though :)

It has 34K, for who asked earlier
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
906 Posts
@white

I'm hoping that if (from what I read) GM discourages the flushes, and my car is still under warranty, that they wouldn't do the flush. That's just my 'thought' though :)

It has 34K, for who asked earlier

When I talked to my service dept, I asked them about me making the switch over to Amsoil and they said that they would do it, I asked them what I would need and he said just bring me 12 qts of fluid and they will hook it up to the machine and flush it all out..
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sunline Fan

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
My local gm dealer and ford dealership both do flushes with a machine. Not sure on the others but probably also do it this way.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,765 Posts
I am curious as to what Andrei recommends in this case.. I was under the assumption that if you take it to the dealership they will hook it up to a machine and by doing that it cycles the new fluid through all lines and coolers..
My recommendation is neither. What I will be doing to my truck (1991 Toyota Pickup) is I will remove the feed cooler line from the transmission and put it in a bucket that I will have previously marked with quart gradients. I will then turn the truck on, and watch as the fluid gets pumped into the bucket. As I am watching, I will pour new transmission fluid into the truck through the dipstick. Once I am 10 quarts in or once the fluid is coming out practically "brand new clear," I will turn the truck off, plug the cooler line back in, and then let it idle till the trans is warm and fill to the correct level.

That being said, I have heard the transmission cooler lines are not quite that easy to get to on a Cruze, so the next best option is to perform two drains and refills. The transmission holds 9 quarts and you will drain about 4.5 quarts each time you remove the drain plug. Drain the fluid once then refill, go out for a 10 mile drive, come back, and repeat. You will have effectively replaced 75% of the old transmission fluid, which in all practicality is "good enough."

If you CAN get a flush done by a shop, do it. The OE fluid is a good synthetic fluid that will not create deposits all over your engine after 50k miles and will not start waxing up and gumming up your throttle body. The key here is to maintain your vehicle. If you wait 150k miles before a transmission fluid service and you get the trans flushed, you deserve to pay for your ignorance and negligence. The owner's manual clearly states 45k miles severe service or 90k miles normal service. Follow that interval and it won't matter how you change the fluid. I say that specifically for the Cruze.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
906 Posts
My recommendation is neither. What I will be doing to my truck (1991 Toyota Pickup) is I will remove the feed cooler line from the transmission and put it in a bucket that I will have previously marked with quart gradients. I will then turn the truck on, and watch as the fluid gets pumped into the bucket. As I am watching, I will pour new transmission fluid into the truck through the dipstick. Once I am 10 quarts in or once the fluid is coming out practically "brand new clear," I will turn the truck off, plug the cooler line back in, and then let it idle till the trans is warm and fill to the correct level.

That being said, I have heard the transmission cooler lines are not quite that easy to get to on a Cruze, so the next best option is to perform two drains and refills. The transmission holds 9 quarts and you will drain about 4.5 quarts each time you remove the drain plug. Drain the fluid once then refill, go out for a 10 mile drive, come back, and repeat. You will have effectively replaced 75% of the old transmission fluid, which in all practicality is "good enough."

If you CAN get a flush done by a shop, do it. The OE fluid is a good synthetic fluid that will not create deposits all over your engine after 50k miles and will not start waxing up and gumming up your throttle body. The key here is to maintain your vehicle. If you wait 150k miles before a transmission fluid service and you get the trans flushed, you deserve to pay for your ignorance and negligence. The owner's manual clearly states 45k miles severe service or 90k miles normal service. Follow that interval and it won't matter how you change the fluid. I say that specifically for the Cruze.
That's all I needed to know..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
For my ford escape, ford states to run the vehicle through the gears for 2 minutes and then drain and fill again. That's how I did my escape the second time. The first time I didn't know that. Mind you I have a hoist and for peace of I wouldn't run through the gears with the front elevated 2 ft off the ground
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top