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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I was under my car doing other work with the front panels removed, I noticed the transmission cooler lines were leaking around the metal barbs. It's not too bad but enough I'd like to repair it. I'd prefer to do a permanent fix and not just replace the lines with OEM parts that will just leak again in the future.

Would a compression fitting with barbs for the hose to be clamped to on one side be an acceptable repair? Like what guys installing tranny coolers use? Something like this Derale Transmission Line Compression Fitting Kit - 3/8" Line to 3/8" NPT Barb Derale Accessories and Parts D13032

Is there something better? I'm all ears. I searched around here but didn't find something conclusive that I was looking for.
 

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all ive ever used is the barbs (shown in your link) with hose clamp around it (on my jeeps, or automatic semis at work) no failures afterwards.

have used those compression fittings (shown in your link) for air lines.
 

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I've used something like this to connect to the radiator. Mine is a different brand, and I got it from Rockauto.

Derale Snap-In Radiator Adapter Fitting for GM Derale Accessories and Parts D13035

I just had a shop replace my lines on the 1.4L because they were leaking so bad, and due to weather I didn't have a nice place to work.

The key is going to be connecting to the transmission side. If it's like a standard GM transmission the connection at the transmission is going to be a special flange type connection. I'm guessing cutting the tube and going compression to hose barb might be the best solution.

Definitely better than just putting the hose over the pipe with clamps. There's a little pressure there that I'd be concerned with.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've used something like this to connect to the radiator. Mine is a different brand, and I got it from Rockauto.

Derale Snap-In Radiator Adapter Fitting for GM Derale Accessories and Parts D13035

I just had a shop replace my lines on the 1.4L because they were leaking so bad, and due to weather I didn't have a nice place to work.

The key is going to be connecting to the transmission side. If it's like a standard GM transmission the connection at the transmission is going to be a special flange type connection. I'm guessing cutting the tube and going compression to hose barb might be the best solution.

Definitely better than just putting the hose over the pipe with clamps. There's a little pressure there that I'd be concerned with.
Thanks, yeah I know some guys just cut the metal barb and shove the hose over the flare with two hose clamps but like you said I'd like to do a little better. If it was a 10+ year old beater that's exactly what I'd do though :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You didn't mention current mileage but the cooler lines are a powertrain covered component.

Rob
Are they? I did some digging and got conflicting answers. That's good to know. I suppose I could call the dealer and ask. I'm only at 41K

At the same time, if they are just going to replace them with the same thing that will leak anyways, I'd be interested in just permanently fixing it myself now.
 

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I know in cold climates the transmission cooler lines on the Duramax trucks have leakage issues and many manufacturers offer aftermarket kits to replace/repair them. I have the Fleece kit on my Duramax truck that was leaking pretty bad after 363,XXX miles!!!

Maybe they will offer something similar for the Cruze
 

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Cooler lines are NOT covered unless under 36,000 miles. Went thru this about 3 months ago with the dealer, not covered 37,000 miles. They wanted almost $500 to fix this problem for me. HA HA i laughed at them. Where the two lines enter the transmission they are connected together with a bolt holding them in. The best way to fix this is to cut the metal lines with a tubing cutter on both ends and replace the hose. Hose clamps over the end of the hose works just fine. I use 2 at each end just to be safe as the cooler lines are not under high pressure. Just enough to circulate the fluid. Really an easy fix.
 

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Does anybody have a picture of the leaking lines they can post here?
 

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Don't have a picture but they are more like seeping than leaking. They are seeping from the crimp fitting, where the steel line is crimped to the flexible hose. Gm's outsourcing for lines and hoses has been problematic over the last 10 or so years.
 

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I believe what you are describing is the same location that the Duramax trucks leak from... Merchant Automotive makes a kit for the trucks that replaces the crimped sections with screw on and new hoses. If they are the same diameter two of them might work for Cruze owners... From what the MA guys tell me it is much more of an issue in cold climates than down south where the weather is more stable...
 

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Just looked under there. Add me to the "leaking transmission cooler lines" club.
 

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I have the same problem with my 2012. After looking at Chris' reply, I'm wondering would 3/8 fuel injection line hose and hose clamps work ? Assuming I had enough room to utilize the original line bracket.
 

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I have the same problem with my 2012. After looking at Chris' reply, I'm wondering would 3/8 fuel injection line hose and hose clamps work ? Assuming I had enough room to utilize the original line bracket.
No.

You can have a decent quality hydraulic hose made for you at somewhere like Tractor Supply Company, though.
 
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