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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The turbo oil feed tube has banjo bolt and washers on one side. These washers are used on the coolant lines running into the back of the turbo as well. I am having a hard time tracking down these numbers. They are bonded rubber-metal washers, 10.1mm inside diameter (rubber), 18.1mm outside (metal), 1.5mm thickness.

They are number 11 in this diagram

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow those are expensive for being so small. I may hit up the local fastenal/grainger to see if they have something close enough.
 

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Wow those are expensive for being so small. I may hit up the local fastenal/grainger to see if they have something close enough.
Please post what you might find. Seals in general are going to be an issue with these GEN 1 cars as the originals are now facing 7-8 years old.

Hoses are the same way. Many of the hoses have GM parts and prices, but can be relatively expensive given what they are.

The thermostat gasket was $8.00 on rockauto, and the ACDelco one was a repackaged Opel gasket straight from Germany complete with German packaging. This one is custom molded for the 1.4L.

However, some of the small coolant lines behind the turbo.. Probably can be obtained by buying standard molded hoses, and "cut to fit if you knew which hose to use as a starting point.
 

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Wow those are expensive for being so small. I may hit up the local fastenal/grainger to see if they have something close enough.
That's why I recommended you just buy the new line, which is ~$30 or so, which comes with all of those parts already. Instead, you'll be running around all over the place in hopes you get the exact parts you need. Just makes no sense to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's why I recommended you just buy the new line, which is ~$30 or so, which comes with all of those parts already. Instead, you'll be running around all over the place in hopes you get the exact parts you need. Just makes no sense to me.
The problem is I need 6 of these washer/seals. Like I said they're used on the coolant passages on the back of the turbo. Two are on another banjo bolt on the engine block, and one on each connector on the turbo. I'm hesitant to use straight copper crush washers like brakes because of the lack of surface area these banjo bolt holes have on the actual tube side.

Rock auto has the washers for $2.83 a piece if searched by the part number 55571900. I just hate the shipping rock auto always charges, as in this case the 6 I need come from two different warehouses and cost $10 shipping. Makes this ~$26 for 6 washers :vomit:

https://www.rockauto.com/en/parts/general+motors,55571900,coolant+hose+seal,15190
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Finally finished this project. For anyone going about this themselves, you'll need these parts if you plan to remove the turbo to get at the oil cooler. It is recommended to remove the turbo and replace these pieces as well (in my opinion) since some of them have very small, easily leak-able O-rings that do not age well.

1) 55572127 (you will need two) - Quick fitting connector - Turbo coolant line - Updated part number is 25199813. As far as I can tell the only difference between the old and new numbers are the washers that come with it. The new part has a very thin, cheaply made washer that I did not feel comfortable using.

2) 55567067 - Turbo coolant return line. This is one of two lines for the turbo, and fits into one of the quick fittings mentioned in (1). I applied plumbing silicone grease to the inside O-ring and the line end to allow the line to slip on the inner O-ring. You will need to turn the fitting separate from the line to install. Once the line is installed to the quick connector it cannot be easily removed, so do so only when ready!

3) 55568031 - Turbo coolant feed line. This is one of two lines for the turbo, and fits into one of the quick fittings mentioned in (1). I applied plumbing silicone grease to the inside O-ring and the line end to allow the line to slip on the inner O-ring. You will need to turn the fitting separate from the line to install. Once the line is installed to the quick connector it cannot be easily removed, so do so only when ready!

4) 12646199 - Exhaust manifold gasket. These are metal, and in theory should be reusable. Mine, however, separated into the 3 plates upon removal. Best to just get a new one, they are cheap.

5) 55592600 - Turbo oil feed pipe. I reused mine as I had already replaced it once before, but it is suggested to replace this line if you never have, or at the very least get new washers mentioned in (6).

6) 55571900 (you will need six) - Rubberized washer. These go on the two banjo bolts for the turbo coolant return line (at the engine block x2) and the oil feed line (at the turbo x2). The other remaining two go on the backside of the turbo on the connectors mentioned in (1).

7) 55587854 - Turbo oil drain line. These are plastic. If you have age+miles on your vehicle this will almost certainly crack and break. Comes with new gaskets and O-rings.

8) Oil cooler O-rings. I found a set on ebay, I don't think the set has an official part number. I recommend, if you have the ability, to source the common O-rings from a local supply store (preferably viton) in a size that is slightly fatter than supplied (and I mean slightly, like 0.25mm in thickness). The O-rings smash down over time, and will not bounce back, eventually causing a leak again. Slightly thicker O-ring should hold off a leak for at least a little longer.

Some tips;

1) The turbo coolant supply line (top line with a clamped hose on one end, notthe banjo bolt line) may require some side pressure to get the securing bolt onto the oil cooler. DO NOT BEND THIS LINE. You will end up putting side pressure on the internal O-ring of the quick connector, making for an uneven seal around the tube. This is asking for a leak. Instead, either do not put the securing bolt back (the line isn't going anywhere), or stack a washer or two between the line's bracket, and the oil cooler so the line can be held with as little side pressure as possible.

2) Do you oil pan gasket while you have everything apart. There's four (I think?) bolts holding the exhaust cross brace on that allows it to hang down enough to get the oil pan in/out. Don't forget to remove the two hidden oil pan bolts near the transmission housing. They are tucked up into the pan itself and not on the outside.

3) A second set of hands helps get the catalytic converter back in place with the band clamp. If you are alone, put the converter on the bracket that is bolted to the engine bracket, and from the top try to maneuver it against the turbo. It can be done, just not fun.

4) My manual suggested the exhaust manifold bolts are not reusable. This is untrue. The manifold bolts are actually studs with copper(?), or some other type of metal, nut that goes on the stud. To reinstall, it is easiest to remove a stud or two from this copper-ish nut and hang the gasket and manifold+turbo on them on cylinder head, then install the others to clamp down. Not necessary, but lining up a single stud+nut while holding a turbo+exhaust manifold+gasket is not fun.

5) Approx 1 gallon of coolant will poor out of the engine block from the turbo coolant return line (bottom line with the banjo bolt, 17mm). Have a pan ready. Leave the coolant reservoir cap on to prevent the coolant from flying out all at once, and instead will make it gulp out slowly.
 
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