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Discussion Starter #1
More than I would expect an a car that's about 3 years old.

WP_20160522_17_39_10_Pro[1].jpg WP_20160522_17_39_21_Pro[1].jpg
 

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Looks like abrasion followed by corrosion in the abraded areas.

Given your mileage it doesn't surprise me. And in all honesty looks pretty good to me.

Do you have splash guards?
Do you ever drive on gravel roads?
Do you drive on roads treated with sand / grit / salt in winter time?
Do you ever exceed the posted speed limit (increases the force with which abrasives will impact your vehicle)?
 

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I also take note that it is always starting from the welds.
 

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Consistent with anything exposed to road chemicals......welded areas always rust first because the process damages the metals 'skin' for lack of a better term.
Next areas to show it are the spot welds where bracing has been attached to floors......same reason.

Currently cosmetic but six or seven more seasons will have things looking evil.

Same car operated in the South or Southwest just gets dirty down there.

SUX,
Rob
 

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I would jack the car up on some ramps and put a wire brush on a 4" grinder and brush off that surface rust...then paint with primer and black paint to take care of this before it ever gets bad
 

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I am definitely planning on treating and painting it. I am a fan of Extend rust converter to start. it turns the rust into iron oxide and acta as a paintable primer. I've had good luck with it before. I am going to tackle this on my vacation.

Tomko, As for your questions:

Do you have splash guards?
No
Do you ever drive on gravel roads?
Yes
Do you drive on roads treated with sand / grit / salt in winter time?

Yes
Do you ever exceed the posted speed limit (increases the force with which abrasives will impact your vehicle)?
Speed limit is 70 here which is plenty fast for abrasion to have an effect. I never thought of that.
 

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I am a fan of Extend rust converter to start.
Maybe if you get all the rust off first. Otherwise, the surface of rust protects the deeper layer. I did pretty good with Ospho. Same thing without the plastic coat. Since there's no plastic in it, you can apply as many treatments as needed to covert all the rust.
 

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Look into POR15 if you want to treat these areas. It is a three step process.

When my Tahoe was new I used POR15 to treat the entire underside. It lasted a good 10 years and only gave up because I never top coated it to protect from UV radiation.
 

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I am definitely planning on treating and painting it. I am a fan of Extend rust converter to start. it turns the rust into iron oxide and acta as a paintable primer. I've had good luck with it before. I am going to tackle this on my vacation.

Tomko, As for your questions:

Do you have splash guards?
No
Do you ever drive on gravel roads?
Yes
Do you drive on roads treated with sand / grit / salt in winter time?

Yes
Do you ever exceed the posted speed limit (increases the force with which abrasives will impact your vehicle)?
Speed limit is 70 here which is plenty fast for abrasion to have an effect. I never thought of that.
You do know that 70 MPH is pretty fast on a gravel road. ;)
 

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This is normal rusting from exposed metal to air and moisture. Metal doesn't need salt to rust just air and moisture. There is a black paint from Rustoleum that you just spray on an it reacts with to coat it and stop the rust. Don't need to brush any of it off just get the dirt off and it will adhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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Look into POR15 if you want to treat these areas. It is a three step process.

When my Tahoe was new I used POR15 to treat the entire underside. It lasted a good 10 years and only gave up because I never top coated it to protect from UV radiation.
This.

We did the entire underside of my buddy's '86 Monte Carlo (Frame, suspension components, axle, underside of the trunk floor pan - and the entire upper surface of the interior and trunk floor, too). We ended up prying on the frame to get tubular A-arms in later on, and it totally stood up to our significant abuse.
 

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I noticed some small rust discoloration at the joints in all four doors at the top corner of the window frames. Bad spot and probably really difficult to do something with. I'll try to load a pic later.
 

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This is normal rusting from exposed metal to air and moisture. Metal doesn't need salt to rust just air and moisture.
Salt dramatically speeds the process.

Oxidation is the process of losing an electron. Salt makes moisture conductive.
 

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This is normal rusting from exposed metal to air and moisture. Metal doesn't need salt to rust just air and moisture. There is a black paint from Rustoleum that you just spray on an it reacts with to coat it and stop the rust. Don't need to brush any of it off just get the dirt off and it will adhere.
I live in Portland, Oregon, a very wet climate 8 months of the year but no road salt usage. You wouldn't see that much rust on the average ten year-old car here. Salt is horrible to vehicles.

Fortunately, my CTD only saw one season of salted Minnesota roads before moving. Even then, it has more rust than a similar aged car (2.5 years) which has spent its whole life here, but at least my rust is limited to a very small amount on the exhaust mounts (heat speeds the process) and the brake rotors (bare metal). The rest of the car looks great.
 
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