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I have a leak at the T connection on the water outlet and the hose of the upper coolant reservoir line. I bought a new line, part 13251447. So the new hose shows up and the connection at the water outlet is different and doesn't appear to fit my older style outlet.

So I still have a leak and plan on changing the water outlet to match the new hose as it doesn't look too hard to get to. However, here's my question. It looks like the outlet has changed as well. Is this the correct new part number: 25193922? I would also need the gasket, part number: 55562045 as well correct?

I want to make sure I am getting the correct revisions for my new hose I have here and more importantly so I can fix my leak.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Update as I did this repair myself and wanted to share the procedure as this part seems to fail a lot. I have a 2012 Cruze, and needed BOTH the upper coolant reservoir hose and the water outlet for my repair. The connections have been revised on the hose and water outlet. It's a much better design, but you can't use the new style hose on the older water outlet. The part numbers and approximate online costs for each part are as follows:

13251447 New Revision Upper Coolant Reservoir Hose, $12 online
25193922 New Revision Water Outlet, $23 online

You no NOT need to buy any gaskets as the outlet comes with the gasket. It's a VERY easy job, you just need e-torx sockets for the bolts on the water outlet. Start by disconnecting the upper charge pipe from the throttle body, unplugging the IAT sensor in the pipe, and move the pipe out of the way. Then disconnect the coolant temp sensor. Remove the 4 hoses to the water outlet, 3 e-torx fasteners, and pull the water outlet. Have a bucket ready as coolant will come out.

Make sure the old water outlet gasket is off, clean the mating surfaces and reverse the procedure. Should take 30 mins tops, 45 with ample coolant system bleeding.

Good luck.

 
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Anybody know the changed coolant tank? I want the tank with the cap that clicks when closed. Does anybody know if you have to change the tank to use that cap or can you just buy the new cap and it will work on a 2011 coolant tank.
 

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Cooling systems are not new, neither are coolant reservoirs, or recovery tanks, or whatever they are calling them now. Liked them much better when radiators were made out of brass, brass could be repaired and cleaned with acid, plastic and aluminum are strictly throwaway items and have to be replaced. So who is saving money with this crap, certainly not he consumers, but the OEM's are, and why isn't this reflected on the sticker price?

Coolant lines were standard size neoprene hoses that you could buy by the foot, could use conventional screw clamps, but this all changed when they went to plastic, had to use spring clamps. Now all specialized parts.

How about this with a vehicle slightly over fives years old, speaking from experience, need a specialized part and your dealer says no longer available. And by law, only required to supply these parts five years after the date of manufacture. So you either end up pitching this POS or chasing all over the country trying to find that part.

Never use to be this way, but is now, unless you know how to make your own parts. 75 bucks to replace a defective PCV? Use to be less than a couple of bucks when conventional hoses were used, just another example.
 

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You no NOT need to buy any gaskets as the outlet comes with the gasket.

The small o-ring that goes on the upper coolant reservoir hose where it hooks into the water outlet does need to be saved though, or at least in my case, the new hose did not come with one.

I had to replace my water outlet today due to a leak from somewhere, and decided to follow your guide with installation of a new water outlet + reservoir hose with the updated P/N's. It was actually rather fortuitous to replace the reservoir hose at the same time, because when I pulled it out of the water outlet during disassembly, the part of the hose that was hooked into the outlet literally disintegrated in front of me. That could have blown apart at any time with total coolant loss, and a call to a tow truck. I would just about recommend replacement of that hose as preventive maintenance...

Anyway, because it fell apart, it took me forever to find that stupid little o-ring. Other than that, it's a fairly easy job to replace the outlet + reservoir hose.
 

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Kids today would have to go to a museum to see what a radiator cap looks like. With one, and just a zero pressure plastic reservoir tank, even had to replace those in a vehicle around 8-10 years old. Plastic gets brittle and with road vibrations will crack.

Now hitting these things with 221*F coolant temperatures and 25 psi of pressure, can only expect problems. O'rings are not just O'rings, kinds used in plumbing can't take the temperatures, also different materials used in AC systems.

From history, best O'ring is no O'ring, always have been a problem. Just more problems for the consumer to ease production assembly times.
 

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I have the opposite problem. We changed our water outlet and then I had to order a new inlet hose, but the fitting on the inlet hose will not fit the new water outlet. What is the part number for the inlet hose for new water outlet?
 
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