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Hello all. This is my first year with my Cruze 2.0L TD . I have been running premium D2 with the prescribed dosage of opti-lube. Here in Illinois we are currently seeing -7° degree temps and I was wondering if opti-lube is compatible with diesel 911? I have already needed a new battery and I want to avoid any diesel gelling that could happen. I have no way to get a block heater in this winter. But anyway. I was wondering what you like to use in sub zero temperatures for additives.

Thanks!
 

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I drive semi's. I use howes. 1 bottle is good for 250 gallons. That should last you guys at least a couple of months.

Block heaters don't do anything for fuel gell. Block heaters don't even tie in to the fuel system. You'll still have to worry about the tank, filter, and lines that run from the tank to engine and back.

BTW, the semi drivers are saying they add kerosene or unleaded gas or something else. I'd have to find that thread again. They add 1 gallon to each tank. Semi's usually have 2 tanks and hold a total of 200 - 300 gallons.
 

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I kinda think fuel additives are similiar to vitamins and over the counter supplements, may not need either and folks use or take them without doing enough research to determine 1. If they are needed at all 2. If needed which ones are best for your application and compatibility to your car or body. I haven’t added anything to car fuel system on cruze and don’t plan too.

Oh and on a side note, if I don’t have to start a car in sub zero weather I just do not. It got down to -11 last night and is a balmy -7 as I write this, if I can just stay home I do, it’s just safer and better not to be starting a car so cold, just because it starts doesn’t mean it should. Smiles
 

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I live in a far colder region than most. For more than four years and 68,000 miles I have never once used a fuel additive. I always park outside on the lane way. And only once did I ever plug in my oil pan heater.

I have never had a fuel related problem.

But I have always bought my diesel from Shell - and use their V-power formulation exclusively.

@boraz operates in the coldest temperature of any of us. Maybe he can share his views on diesel treatments.
 

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I use Power Service DieselKleen in the summer and their diesel Diesel Fuel Supplement in the winter in every tank. I probably don't need to, but when I bought the car new I did extensive research on the various additives and their benefits. My car runs pretty good and have had no DPF or regen issues besides a soot covered O2 sensor that shot the code, this occurred before the recall. I live in NJ and we get pretty cold as of the past few winters I have had the car, 0 degrees and close to it this past week. I have never had any issues starting the car besides when the original battery gave out.
 

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Funny this topic came up, after leaving my car in North NJ for 3 days during this cold spell, I ended up with gelled diesel. Never happened to me before. Dragged the car into the garage with my lawn tractor and warmed it up. Wasn't able to find any anti-gel additives nearby and most auto parts stores were closed by the time I got the car running again. Hopefully it'll start tomorrow for work ..
 

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I drive semi's. I use howes. 1 bottle is good for 250 gallons. That should last you guys at least a couple of months.

Block heaters don't do anything for fuel gell. Block heaters don't even tie in to the fuel system. You'll still have to worry about the tank, filter, and lines that run from the tank to engine and back.

BTW, the semi drivers are saying they add kerosene or unleaded gas or something else. I'd have to find that thread again. They add 1 gallon to each tank. Semi's usually have 2 tanks and hold a total of 200 - 300 gallons.
just straight methyl hydrate in your tank, gallon each side <---- for semis

or just buy proper fuel.

its been -36f for a week here, my kenworth has fine, no additives

my ctd is fine, no additives

the fuel is proper for the regional temps
 

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I live in a far colder region than most. For more than four years and 68,000 miles I have never once used a fuel additive. I always park outside on the lane way. And only once did I ever plug in my oil pan heater.

I have never had a fuel related problem.

But I have always bought my diesel from Shell - and use their V-power formulation exclusively.

@boraz operates in the coldest temperature of any of us. Maybe he can share his views on diesel treatments.
10-4 on that.

just buy proper fuel, then you dont need the additives.

the additives are probably not friendly to our emissions systems, im not willing to find out.

have started the ctd in -51f UNPLUGGED NO ADDITIVES started fine couple years ago

started couple days ago -36f UNPLUGGGED NO ADDITIVES started fine, one the second try, lol...first go didnt fire....paused 5 seconds, turned the key again, FIRE.

still on OG battery.
 

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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Thanks, weird acronym...sounds like it's out of a rap or something. I'd use OEM or Orig or something.
That's because it is.

OG was the name of a 1991 Ice-T album "O.G. Original Gangster".

I'd imagine the "OG" came to just refer to more than original gangsters - original anything, really.
 
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Certainly buying proper fuel is good advice... but HOW do you know if the fuel is the proper fuel? Here in USA Diesel can vary from region to region, a person could travel from the south, with non-winterized fuel, end up pretty far north and cold.. then have an issue. Besides, with the VW HPFP debacle, they found even the lubricity of Diesel fuel, and subsequent failures of pumps varied by region due to variances in fuel quality (in this case the now required lubricity additives for ULSD). It's easy to offer good advice on buying proper fuel, but not so easy to follow that advice when it's impossible to be sure the fuel is "proper" when there are documented variances from region to region here in the USA. This is why some choose to run additives, maybe its not needed most of the time, depending on the quality of fuel, but when on a long trip, it becomes hard to know about the fuel quality, and it can be a gamble.. it's not as if you can carry a portable test kit and determine if the fuel is "proper" or not before pumping. For this reason I keep all fuel receipts, so if I do end up with bad fuel I have a chance to hold the fuel station accountable for the consequences.. but hope to never need to do so. I'd bet Canada, being as cold, and north, has much more consistent standards and fuel quality.. thus Boraz, you can easily get "proper" fuel... not so easy for those of us south of the border to know what is, or is not proper. It's not like the pump is going to say anything more than ULSD..
 

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Certainly buying proper fuel is good advice... but HOW do you know if the fuel is the proper fuel? Here in USA Diesel can vary from region to region, a person could travel from the south, with non-winterized fuel, end up pretty far north and cold.. then have an issue. Besides, with the VW HPFP debacle, they found even the lubricity of Diesel fuel, and subsequent failures of pumps varied by region due to variances in fuel quality (in this case the now required lubricity additives for ULSD). It's easy to offer good advice on buying proper fuel, but not so easy to follow that advice when it's impossible to be sure the fuel is "proper" when there are documented variances from region to region here in the USA. This is why some choose to run additives, maybe its not needed most of the time, depending on the quality of fuel, but when on a long trip, it becomes hard to know about the fuel quality, and it can be a gamble.. it's not as if you can carry a portable test kit and determine if the fuel is "proper" or not before pumping. For this reason I keep all fuel receipts, so if I do end up with bad fuel I have a chance to hold the fuel station accountable for the consequences.. but hope to never need to do so. I'd bet Canada, being as cold, and north, has much more consistent standards and fuel quality.. thus Boraz, you can easily get "proper" fuel... not so easy for those of us south of the border to know what is, or is not proper. It's not like the pump is going to say anything more than ULSD..
my entire point is the car is not at fault

the fuel is

you cant spend $14 or $2000 on a gadget to overcome it.

use good fuel

whether good fuel is out of the pump or some witches brew you concoct with profit making substances from the auto parts shelf is up to each.

the car is perfect as is with proper fuel for 99% of buyers and 100% of owners on this board.

the fuel is the issue, always has been.

and 100% on the tdi hpfp....same cars were sold in canada, nowhere near the failures here...fuel was/is? made to a better standard.
 
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