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Here is what I found when I pulled the turbo feedline. I have the later style double O ring pipe but it did not have any insulation. The o rings were worn and brittle and clearly the double o ring is not a permanent fix .. Like duh, its a cheap botch like most of the hose connections on this car.

I went to my local farm store and bough 4 replacement O rings for $1 and put it back together and it doesn't leak.

Now the dilemma, I have ordered the new replacement pipe and I am in two minds whether to just send it back or to replace the current pipe when it arrives. On the one hand my fix appears to work perfectly well but nowhere on the box of hardware store o rings did it tell me what the material was.. I'm sure its perfectly fine but for $30 and the tiny risk of being in the middle of nowhere is it worth the risk? The new pipe will have the insulation so there is the tiny risk that there might be some carbonised oil in the existing pipe about to break loose and do a number on my turbo bearings.

As I say, I consider the risks to be very small but the cost to make sure I got the right thing is not great either.

Now anyone have any thoughts on the likely state of the return pipe? Anyone seen one fail?

Frank
 

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Here is what I found when I pulled the turbo feedline. I have the later style double O ring pipe but it did not have any insulation. The o rings were worn and brittle and clearly the double o ring is not a permanent fix .. Like duh, its a cheap botch like most of the hose connections on this car.

I went to my local farm store and bough 4 replacement O rings for $1 and put it back together and it doesn't leak.

Now the dilemma, I have ordered the new replacement pipe and I am in two minds whether to just send it back or to replace the current pipe when it arrives. On the one hand my fix appears to work perfectly well but nowhere on the box of hardware store o rings did it tell me what the material was.. I'm sure its perfectly fine but for $30 and the tiny risk of being in the middle of nowhere is it worth the risk? The new pipe will have the insulation so there is the tiny risk that there might be some carbonised oil in the existing pipe about to break loose and do a number on my turbo bearings.

As I say, I consider the risks to be very small but the cost to make sure I got the right thing is not great either.

Now anyone have any thoughts on the likely state of the return pipe? Anyone seen one fail?

Frank
So the old oil pipe has had no insulation and could be starting to restrict the oil flow and in turn burning up the turbo. The $30 that the new pipe cost is good insurance to save your turbo.
 

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I keep mine well insulated from the heat, even used the left over wrap I had from that coolant line fix above it.
286312
 
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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
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Hi all,

I just experienced the "Exxon Valdez" (massive oil leak) from the turbo oil feed line at 112k miles. I noticed my feed line is not insulated but it does have the large washer rather than just the "side clip" shown in the picture above. So do I have the old style (single o ring) or the new double o ring style?

I might just replace the oring(s) on the end of the pipe while I wait for the new one to show up from Amazon.

While looking on Amazon I saw this statement from one of the "Q&A" on the Amazon site.

"From my research, the root cause of the engine leaking oil is due a failed check valve from the bleed air line to the engine. Once the check valve fails, the over pressure forces each weak link to leak. First the return line, then the oil cooler, then the cam seals."

Can somebody shed light light on what he is talking about? I have never heard of a bleed air line to to cause engine oil to over-pressure.. Is this a real thing?

Secondly, at this many miles what are the odds the the return line is about to fail in the near future? Should that be replaced as well?

Frank
I would get the new version and replace the entire hose. It kind of sounds like they were speaking to the blown PCV valve causing over pressure. That will cause multiple location oil leaks including the crank seal, valve cover, oil pan the CPASV seals etc.
 

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Yeah actually I had the new version (2 O rings) but without the insulation. I did get a new hose and will add additional insulation to it. As it is clear even the 2 O ring hose does not last I will be changing out the o rings every 30,000 miles or so. They cost about 50 cents and it takes 15 minutes so why not.
 

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How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


Overview:
The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


Tools Required:


Part Required:
GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


Procedure:
Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


Start the car and check for leaks.

Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

Old vs New photos:

Ive over tightened now its stripped and leaking oil. What are my choices now to fix the issue.
 

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Ive over tightened now its stripped and leaking oil. What are my choices now to fix the issue.
Does it tighten up at all? Short of a new turbo, maybe a helicoil kit.
 

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How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


Overview:
The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


Tools Required:


Part Required:
GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


Procedure:
Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


Start the car and check for leaks.

Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

Old vs New photos:

Sorry for the language and getting mad, but I followed your torque spec info on here because I do my best to follow torque specs. And this is one time where it bit me in the a**.
How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


Overview:
The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


Tools Required:


Part Required:
GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


Procedure:
Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


Start the car and check for leaks.

Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

Old vs New photos:

Sorry for the language and getting mad but I try to follow torque specs to the "t" and this time bit me in the a** following someone else's info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Sorry for the language and getting mad, but I followed your torque spec info on here because I do my best to follow torque specs. And this is one time where it bit me in the a**.

Sorry for the language and getting mad but I try to follow torque specs to the "t" and this time bit me in the a** following someone else's info.
That info came directly from GM's service manual on the date when it was written. Go yell at them, not me. If you stripped the block, you probably got oil in it and didn't clean out the threads first. Not my fault. Yell at someone else. This thread has been here for SIX YEARS and nobody has reported the issues you have. Take repsonsibility for your own actions. I posted this tutorial for your benefit. Next time, just pay a mechanic.
 
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